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Full text of "The Main Sheet"

mmm 



c 




Should birth control pills 
be available with out a pre- 
scription? 

Focus page 6 



Meet new Student Trustee 
page 2 



Rush Limbaugh raids the 
airways 

page 3 




m SHEET 



September 23,1993 



Issue no. 1 Volume XII 



Cape Cod Community College 



West Barnstable, MA 



Distributed FREE 



Life Fitness Center 
Open Saturdays 



Tuition up, enrollment steady 

by Darlene Mokrycki 

The monetary "axe" which had loomed over the heads of The charge for auditing a course also rose to equal the 

all CCCC students fell this semester in the form of tuition price of a credit course. The funding for the highly 

increases. The cost of a credit hour rose $3 .75 to $80.00, an successful Nurse's Aid program was dropped by Bay State ^ Nancv Brennan 

: c- i;„i. 1— ...-. c, Skills, but the Regional Employment Board will fund the 

pro-am for another year. Tuition and fees for this program ^h^ student Senate approved funding to allow the Life 
are $600 per student. FitnessCentertoopenforfourhourson Saturday throughout 

President Kraus pointed out that while community col- ^^ semester 
lege costs may present hardships for some students, it students want the Life Fitness Center (LFC) open on 

a $7 mcrease per credit, which consists of two fees: the provides exceptional value for their dollars, compared to Saturdays and Loretta Santangelo fought to see it happen. 



increase of a little less than 5% 

Those students who take more than 12 credit hours per 
semester will feel the pinch even harder, because the state's 
Higher Education Coordinating Council eliminated the limit 
on costs for those taking more credits. These costs include 



emergency state shortfall fee, a fee charged to students to 
make up for the money the state failed to supply, and an 
increase of the all purpose fee. The $40 graduation fee was 
eliminated. 



other colleges and universities 



Petitions declaring the need for weekend hours were circu- 



Registrar Grace said that despite higher costs, enrolhnent ^^^^^ ^ ^^^ Spring. As a result, Ms. Santangelo, Director of 



remains approximately at the same level as last year. 




Paul Strowe entertains the crowd at Spree Day. 



fhato hi Btym Russell 



New program supports men in transition 



the LFC, began seeking ways to fund the extra hours. 

A proposal specifying the cost of the 12 week program at 
$960, which would cover Ms. Santangelo's salary for the 
added work-days, was submitted to Dick Rand, Assistant 
Dean of Academic Affairs. Mr. Rand applauded the effort 
but replied that no college ftmds were available. He sug- 
gested approaching the Student Senate for assistance, which 
Ms. Santangelo did before school started. 

The issue was brought up at the first Senate meeting on 
September 8. During the fifteen minute discussion. Senator 
ShiraGoldbergpointedoutthat, "The students want this. It's 
their money, and we owe it to them." 

Senator David Marhefka opposed opening the gym last 
semester. He cited that paying an administrator was not a 
Senate responsibility. 

However, when the same issue was raised this semester, 
Mr. Marhefka vehemently supported the proposal. "1 want 
to use the gym on Saturdays," Marhefka explains. "I didn't 
need to last semester." 

The proposal was approved last semester, yet because of 
slow action by the Senate, the program lasted only four 
weeks. There was inadequate time to advertise the new 
hours, and as a result, the number of students who used the 
facility was low. 

"I didn't know about the extended bom's last semester," 
said one student. "So, I joined a health club mainly to 
workout during the weekend, something most students can't 
■afford to do." 

At the September 15th meeting, eight students turned out 
to show their support of the proposal. Senator Mark Maxim 
noted that, "They're taking their time out to be here. Obvi- 
ously it's a matter of importance." 

The motion was approved unanimously by the Senate. 



by Sheila Johnson 

Last spring CCCC began its first Men in Transition 
program. After discovering an interest in men's issues, the 
Adult Re-Entr>' Center was estabhshed, including the Womens 
and Mens Transition Program. 

The purpose of an Adult Re-Entry program is to assist and 
retrain first-time or re-entry students. The program is 
designed to build academic and vocational skills while 
emphasizing career counseling. 

The Men In Transition (MIT) project evolved as a natural 
offshoot of the Women In Transition (WIT) program. As 
men started to become more involved in the WIT program, 
the need to provide men with flexibility and a support system 
became more and more evident. 



r 



less. 

"The students entering the program are all older, and i!| 
when returning at such an age, they are filled with self !ij 
doubt," said Mr. Warren Ferretti, a CCCC graduate now ) 
attending UMASS Boston for Pre-Med. Mr. Ferretti said 
"The center support students and helps them make their own ; 
success story." Mr. Ferretti received a full tuition scholar- ' 
ship to UMASS, which the center helped him discover and 
apply. 

The ARC provides students with the use of sources for f, 
scholarships, transfer and career information. The center >! 
also has peer adxnsors. 

According to Steve Anderson, a peer advisor and single 



"We are here to help students gain confidence, build self parent of three, the peer advisors are there to help new ! 



esteem, and help them focus on a future," said Dorothy 
Burrill, Director of the ARC. 

"In the past year or so, the men have been coming in 
greater numbers," said Ms. Burrill. "They have been asking 
for the same type of support program that the women have 
been receivmg." 

According to Ms. Burrill the students coming to the ARC 
are non-typical high school students. Most are carrying a lot 
of personal responsibilities and 'extra baggage'. Men and 
women are single parents, unemployed, andmany are home- 



students feel comfortable and to answer a range of questions 
fi-om financial aid to assisting students with personal prob- 
lems. 

The ARC has many projects in the works. It is currently 
exploring a transition program with the Barnstable House of 
Corrections. Ms. Burrill has already meet with the Education 
Coordinator and the Reintegration Director. 

For more information on the ARC please contact Dot 
Burrill at 362-2131 ext.405. 



Should the birth control pill be 
available without a prescription? 

100 CCCC students were asked if they favored 
making the birth control pill available over-the- 
counter. 



35% are opposed 



5% undecided 




60% favor over-the counter 
birth control pills 



MainSheet September 23, 1993 Page 2 



Campus News 



campus, could have been used 
to make this campus handicap 
accessible." 

Mr. MacDonald also plans 
to investigate the reasons be- 
hind increasing fees and tu- 
ition. "My fees are as high as 
my tuition," he said. "That's 
not right." 

As a person who is work- 
ing, going to school, and rais- 

ing a family, he understands the presstire students face trying 
to stay afloat. He and his wife Karen have just had a baby 
boy, Ian Harrison. Mr. MacDonald also has a four-year old 
named Robbie. When asked about being a non-traditional 
student, he laughs and said, "Anyone who comes back to 
school at my age must be doing something right." 




News Briefs 



New Student Trustee breaks the stereotype 

by Nancy Brennan 

Picture any Board of Trustees across the country. Blue 
suits. Red ties. Grey hair. Then enters the newest member 
of the Board, a tall, lanky, long-haired guy, dressed in denim, 
leather and cowboy boots (with spurs). Rob MacDonald has 
broken the tradition of conservatively clad trustees with a 
tough new look and a serious agenda. 

Elected to the Board in the spring, Mr. MacDonald aims 
to ensure that student interests are not overlooked. The first 
item on his list of areas that need deep consideration is the 
expansion ofCCCC into downtown Hyannis. Mr. MacDonald 
contends that the purchase of buildings on Main Street are 
not in the best interest of the college. "We should be looking 
down-Cape or off-Cape," said Mr. MacDonald, of the new 
expansion plans. "People should not have to drive so far." 
He considers the opening of the downtovra campus "ludi- 
crous." 

"I'm concerned with where the money is going," Mr. 
MacDonald explains. "What was spent on opening the new 



College opens downtown campus 



level courses. 

The new campus opened this semester 
with college credit and non-credit courses. The new location 
of the Hyannis Campus Adult Learning Center is 540 Main 
Street, and is part of the Factory Outlet Building between 
Main and North Street The center acccmunodates day, evening, 
and early morning classes. 

The courses offered range from GED Preparation to 
computer courses with English, Law, Psychology, Intema- 
tional Relations, and Food Beverage Management courses, 
among others. 

Although about half of the 25 courses scheduled 
were canceled due to low registration, Patricia Wild, cowdi- 
nator of the new Hyannis campus, is optimistic about its 
future. "More marketing and exposure to the community 
will increase not only enrollment, but commimity involve- 
ment as well," said Mrs. Wild. The enthusiasm at the new 
campus is high among those dedicated to its success. As Pat 
Wild puts it, "Watch our steam, because there 's so much that 
can be done here. We are personally committed as well as 
professionally." 

More infprmatioa on the new campus can be ol> 
tained by visiting the downtowii location or by calling at 778- 
2221 or 778-2223. 



The new CCCC campus in downtown Hyannis 
offers fi«e adult education through its Adult Learning Center 
with programs such as the Adult Literacy Project and English 
as a Second Language (ESL). 

Funding for the ALC is provided by federal funds 
through various grants and fimding. The Massachusetts 
English Literacy Demonstration Project (MELD) which 
provides fimds for the ESL program is, "one of only three 
offered in the country" according to Peter Birkel who over- 
sees the grants. 

None of this would be possible without the coopera- 
tion of the Cape Cod Literacy Council who recognize the 
overwhelmingly high numbers of adult literacy not only on 
the Cape but throughout the entire country. 

"Despite the prestige here on Cape Cod, we have an 
underworld of people with need. There are over 8,000 adults 
with a 7th or below grade level on Cape Cod and over 
hundreds who can't speak enough English to get job train- 
ing", stated Patricia Wild, part time programs coordinator of 
the new campus. 

"The Job Training and Employment Corporation 
(JTEC) which occupies half the ALC runs the English as a 
Second Language project and the Life Skills program. Tlfe 
goals of the JTEC, in cooperation with ALC are to prepare 
their students for entry level for job training and /or college 

Dave Ziemba takes charge of the ADC 

by Kevin Motdton 

How many people here at school actually have an idea 
what the ADC is? To most it is probably just another room 
located in South Hall that they pass on their way to class. 
Professor David Ziemba hopes that this will change over the 
course of the fall semester. 

The Academic Development Center (ADC) is one of 
three centers (the writing center and the math lab being the 
others) on campus designed to assist students who are 
seeking help with their course load. 

Professor Ziemba, who began teaching at the college in 
1988, recently was appointed as the new man to head the 
center. While he is presently teaching a course in develop- 
mental math, over the past few years Professor Ziemba has 
served as a tutor in subjects such as economics and computer 
programming for the center. 

"The main purpose of the ADC," said Professor Ziemba, 
"is to offer students one to one tutoring with teachers, so that 
more personal attention can be devoted to a student's prob- 
lems then can be in a larger class room setting." As the new 
director, it will be Professor Ziemba's responsibility to 
oversee the center's fimding and staff. 

In a survey released last week nationwide it was reported 
that ahnost 90 million Americans have very limited reading 
and writing skills, which prompted Education Secretary 
Richard Riley to say,"We are painting a picture of a society 
in which the vast majority of Americans are ill-prepared for 



the fliture." 

In an effort to tackle this problem Professor Ziemba 
said,"Hopefully students here who don't feel they have all 
the tools needed to continue with their educations will take 
advantage of all the develop- 
mental courses offered here at Continued on pg. 7 
the college which will help build 
a solid foundation with which to 
work." He also added,"! hope 
students will take advantage of 
the support offered to them here 
at the center before they get in 
over there heads in their classes. 



Educational Foundation names 
new executive director 

Natalie Kaye Linke has been chosen as executive 
director of the CCCC Educational Foundation. 
Ms. Linke, a West Yarmouth resident, is a gradu- 
ate of Colorado State University. 

Sea Change submissions 

Sea Change, the CCCC arts' magazine, is now 
accepting submissions (short stories, poetry, and 
art) for it's 1 994 issue. Please see door ofN237 for 
details. 

Management Program Coordina- 
tor named 

Michael L. Bejtlich has been appointed instructor 
and coordinator of the management program at 
CCCC. Bejtlich most recently held a similar 
position at the Kinyon Campbell Business School 
in New Bedford. Bejtlich earned a Bachelor's 
Degree in Human Resources Management from • 
the UMASS/Amherst and a MBA from Babson 
College. 

CCCC "Alumni of the Year" hon- 
ored at commencement 

Nancy Keefe Dempsey and Eric G. Strauss, still 
Cape residents, have been chosen as co-recipients 
of CCCC's eleventh annual Alumnus of the Year 
Award. Ms. Dempsey graduated withhonois from 
the college m 1972 and received a Bachelor's 
Degree from UMASS/Bostonin 1974. She earned 
a Juris Doctorate from Suffolk University Law 
School in 1978. Mr. Strauss received an Associ- 
ate's Degree from CCCC in 1980 and graduated 
with high honors from Emerson College in 198 1. 
Ite eariied'a lJibct6raI''t)e'gree in'Blblogy from 
Tufts University in 1990. 

Student Senate elections 

Balloting for Senate elections will be held Sept 
27th and 28th in the cafeteria. Live entertaiiunent 
will be present both monday and tuesday. The 
Senate ask's everyone to please participate. 




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YouVe Earned It... 

The opportimity to complete your 

bachelor's degree through the 
Lesley College off-campus program. 

• Attend weekend classes at a local site 

• Transfer in up to 96 credits 

• Earn credit for prior learning 

Lesley College Graduate School 

is offering a Bachelor of Arts degree m 

Human Development 

leading to provisional 
Elementary Education certification 



Please join tis for an information meeting on 
Tuesday, September 28tii at 4-00 pm 

Cape Cod Commimity College 
Student Commons Bklg., Room C106 

Mezzanine Cafeteria, West Barnstable, MA 



For more information, please contact 
Jane Kunihokn at (508) 362-2809 



The Graduate School 
(617) 349-8310 or (800) 999-1959 ext. 8310 



Opinions 



MainSheet September 23, 1993 Page 3 



The good old days 



by Charles Thibodeau 

Machismo, what a word, it rolls from the tongue like 
greasy sweat off the Saturday night arm-wrestlers down at 
Joe's Place. Joe's Place was a small beer and wine joint in 
the north end of Cambridge. On Saturday night the place 
would fill with thirty or so working class men. Cab drivers, 
steel workers, brick layers, and plumbers gathered there. 
Most were clean shaven; they wore pressed pants and starched 
shirts, some wore sweaters, one or two, a sport jacket. Their 
shiny pompadours were held still with Vitaylis Hair Tonic 
for men. The smell of Old Spice and Menen Skin Bracer 
sweetened the smell of used smoke. No beatniks or fags in 
this joint. Occasionally one of the regulars would bring a 
woman by. The guys all checked her out, but no one looked 
twice at her. They all knew that skirts were trouble. 

What ever happened to joints like Joe's Place? A place 
where a guy could go and have a few pops on a Saturday 
night. A place where a guy could get away from the old lady 
and the kids. Maybe play a little shuffle board, catch the 
Saturday night fights,and when the joint closed, pile in the 
car and go out for Chinese food, and if you didn't get home 
to late or two drunk, maybe you got lucky. Those were the 
good old days when men had it koncked. 

As I look back at the good old days I think of my mother. 



I think of all of the times and all the places that we were 
together. I remember my mother caring the heavy load of 
rasing us kids, while my father was off doing what ever men 
did in the good old days. As I think back, the pain of anger 
knots my chest when I realize that she was considered less 
than equal to men by men and women alike in those "good 
old days." 

I look back at the good old days, and I remember my 
mother always standing up for me, I remember how she 
fought to see that I was treated equally, and how she watched 
closely from a distance to be sure that I got my piece of what 
ever was handed out. 

When I look around this campus and I see the rush of eager 
minds arming themselves against the good old days, and I 
remember my mother telling me that her father took her and 
her sisters out of school to work so that their brothers could 
stay in school. 

Machismo is still with us and there are still joints like 
Joe's Place, and there are still people who think our mothers 
are of less value than men. But there is also a growing army 
of people who refuse to tolerate anyone being treated less 
than equal and there are many of us right here at CCCC. 



'Rush: The Nazi Of The Airways' 



by Nancy Brennan 

Seems I can't turn on the radio anymore without getting 
upset. "Cathy and Don," on WXTK make me wonder why 
people who have no clue are allowed to talk on the air. 
"Kenney and Teague," on the same station, bore me to tears 
with their "Gee-we-don't-like-this" rhetoric. And then 
there's Rush Limbaugh, ready to iim his ultra-conservative 
finger nails down my liberal-feminist chalkboard every day 
at noon. 

Rush seems to have a problem with everything that isn't 
Rush. He hates BUI Clinton and the Democrats. Women 
belong at home, barefoot, without hyphenated surnames. 
Blacks are subject to the label "Descendants of slaves." 

Gays and lesbians, according to Rush, should be shipped 
, outtqr^sf ?sc^g5),{^^9 jfan,,^et|i5i^e tli^tlhe^^^^^ 
' preference is ''"choice", flius-removingpublic officials froni 
their duty to adequately protect their rights. And the list goes 
on. 

What's Rush's purpose? Primarily, to sell books and 
achieve high ratings-topics which are the mainstay of his 
agenda. Occasionally, Rush brings up less important topics 
like the deficit, or the ridiculous desire for women to have 
equal rights. 



My personal favorite Rush segment is the Carol Mosely- 
Braun report, which looks into the alleged misconduct of the 
Senator from Illinois. Rush says, "We can't let her get away 
with things just because she'sblack. These liberals are afraid 
of calling her on her conduct because she ' s a "Descendant of 
slaves." The report opens with rap music which leads into 
"The Jefferson's" theme. People have criticized the music as 
being racist, but Rush argues, "Hey, if the producers of the 
Jefferson's can play this and not be called racist, why can't 
I?" Context, Rush. Thmk context. 

I could go on for days about the things Rush says which 
pick my nerves, but what's the point? He's a talk-show host! 
Those wacky right-wingers who stake every fiber of their 
moral and ideological character on what Rush says, will look 
back one day arid say, "Well; it was either Rush or Maury 
Povich." 

I can't stop Rush. I can't change the minds of his cult-like 
following. What I can do is vote. Next time around, I'm 
voting across-the-board Republican. I want a Republican 
president. I want a Republican Congress. Then when things 
start falling ^art, I'm gonna get my own talk show. 




Editorial Staff 



Sheila Johnson 
Michele Queenan 
Kevin Moulton 
Beverly Delaney 
David Whitmore 
Jack Higgins 
Tom Redmond 
Katie Banis 
Vincent Raimo 
Roy Rider 
Charles Thibodeau 
Cindy Steitunueller 
Darlene Mokrycki 
William Babner 



Co-Editor in chief 

Co-Editor in chief 

Features 

Photos 

Photos 

Entertainment 

Campus News/ 

Focus/Women's Issues 

Graphics 

Advertising 

Editorial/ Opinion 

Campus Life 

Copy 

Faculty Advisor 



Contributors 



Sherry Aheam 
Michele Auclair 
Latirel Bloom 
Nancy Brennan 
Jon Coutino 
Sarah Curley 
Lisa Delia 
Jennifer Dixon 
Brian Ford 
Evan Foster 
Amy Gold 



Ada Kelly 

Robert Koenig 

Tetri Ladd 

Martha Love 

Erica Mathews 

Melissa Phaneuf 

Walter Rivieccio 

Erin Rose 

Bryan Russell 

Jayme Wood 



Letters Policy: Letters must include the 
Avriter's name in order to be published, 
MainSheet reserves the right to edit to suit 
length and style requirements. We regret 
that we cannot accept poetry. 



The MainSheet is a member of 
NECNA 
(New England Collegiate 
Newspaper Association) 



Advertise in 

tlie 
i^ainSlieet 



Letters to the Editor 



students know your rights 



To the Editor: 

I would like to remind the student body that last spring 
at the end of school, the campus was embroiled in contro- 
versy concerning music professor Robert Kidd and his 
abusive treatment of students and his high drop/fail rate. I 
am now finding that nothing has been done about this 
matter over the summer. I am saddened that none of the 
abused students have followed the official grievance pro- 
cedure. However, I am not surprised. 

No one has ever gotten anywhere with this college with 
the current method of addressing grievances. Iimderstand 
this policy is being investigated and hopefully a new 
procedure will emerge. 

In the mean time, we are stuck with Dr. Kidd and his 
tantrums. I would encourage his current students to be 
watchfid and understand that you have certain rights as 
college students: 

1. Are you being treated fairly and maturely with the 
respect you deserve? 

2. Are your needs being met academically? Are you 
learning the subject? Music is a very simple subject to 
understand. Don't let anyone tell you differently. Dr. 



Kidd's drop/fail rate last year in his music theory class was 
above 70% so am I told. This to my mind, is a direct 
reflection of his abilities and attitudes as a professor and the 
curriculum he has created this is a community college. It is 
not Juliard. 

If you are abused or neglected, you must file a grievance. 
This situation has been going on for years and has effected 
countless students. Please! This situation is bigger than just 
you. I have been teaching music on Cape Cod for ten years 
and have not been able to recommend that anyone pursue 
music through this college and that makes me sad and angry. 

I would call your attention to the final issue of the 
MainSheet last year, if you would like more information on 
this situation. I am forming a committee to look into this 
matter. We wall be working closely with the Student Senate. 
Anyone wishing to contact me may do so through Senate 
President Tom Edwards. I will be making regular reports to 
the MainSheet. 

Thank You, 
Scott Dickie 



Give the guy a chance, it took a God 7 days 



Death row prisoner 
seeks correspodence 

Dear Editor: 

I am a prisoner on death row at the Arizona State Prison, 
and was wondering if you would do me a &vor. I have been 
here for almost sixteen years and have no family or friends 
on the outside that I can write to. I was wondering if you 
would put an add in the campus news paper for me asking for 
correspondence. If you are not able to do that, then maybe 
you have some type of message or bulletin board you could 
put it on. I know that you are not a pen pal club or anything 
like that, but I would really appreciate it if you could help me. 
Death row prisoner, Caucasian mi'le, age 46 desires 
correspondence with either male or female college students. 
Wants to form friendly relationship and more or less ex- 
change past or present experiences and ideas. Will answer all 
letters and exchange photos. Prison rules require a complete 
name and return address on the outside of the letter. 

Jim Jeffers 
Arizona State Prison 
Box B-38604 
Florence, AZ. 85232 



Dear Editor: 

Hey lay off! We have put up with George Bush for 4 
years, and Ronnie for eight years before. President Clinton 
is at least trying to repair the damages that these two buffoons 
caused. What are we looking for? Reagan and Bush spent 
1 2 years making the rich richer and the poor poorer. I think 
we need to give President Clinton a little more than nine 
months to undo the treachery of the two previous administra- 
tions. In my opinion Clinton HAS done more than either did. 



We have an Attorney General that will stand up to the NRA. 
We have another woman on the US Supreme Court. We have 
an administration with a conscience when regarding our 
environment. He is also making an effort to help people 
obtain an education through community service. He is 
cutting back needless spending by our government, an area 
which previous administrations encouraged. 

I am disappointed over his resolution over the gay rights 



issue, I hope that he will reconsider it in the future. But as a 
whole he has worked with the interest of the American people 
but with great opposition fi'om the Republican party and big 
businesses. 

He needs our support, and we need aman like him. If all 
you right winged assholes dcm't know what is good for you 
then go to Croatia, and Uve your life there. 
Sincerely, 
Michele Stephainy 



MainSheet September 23, 1993 Page 4 



Campus Life 



Student Survey: 



Are you satisfied with Clinton's performance to date? 





Thomas L. Edwards 
Senate President 
"He has done as much as he can 
up to date. We're still feeling 
the effects of the Reagan/Bush 
administration." 



Lisa Hodsodon 
Psychology Major 

"I'd like to see him doing 
more. He's trying. I like his 
idea's but he needs to follow 
through on them." 



Mike Fulcher 
Visual Arts 

"NO! I think he's fiiU of — ! 
He hasn't fulfilled his 
campaign promise." 



Elizabeth Couto 
Liberal Arts 

"He hasn't really done anything. 
He's broken promises like 
Reagan and Bush. He's a 
Kennedy wannabe." 



Debbie Besse 
Libera] Arts 

"He hasn't fulfilled his 
promises. We should be 
moving forward." 



Student Profile: Heather J. Broadhurst 




Name: Heather J. Broadhurst 

Age: 24 

Hometown: Hyannis Park 
Course of Study: Education 

What do you like best about CCCC? 

The fact that there are older students. 



What do you like least about CCCC? 

It's so conservative. 

What do you see yourself doing in 5 years? 

Teaching in Vermont, perhaps. 

Who has been your most influential professor? 

I don't have one yet since it's only my second 
semester. 

WTiat books and movies would you recom- 
mend? For the book, The Unbearable Lightness 
OfBeinghy Milan Kundra and for the movie The 
Time me up, Tie Me Down. 

What's your pet peeve? Andrew 

How do you spend your free time? Taking care 
of my son and sewing. 

Whatisthecraziestthingyoudidthissummer? 

Let Andrew live in my house. 



Club Lacrosse: 
Its success 
depends on you 



by Cindy Sleinmueller 

By popular demand, the sport of lacrosse has come to 
CCCC. Dr. Richard Sommers has begun sign-ups, and 
has arranged for club meetings to elect team and equip- 
ment manageis, and to set up informal practices during 



The team will be co-edjplaying xmder mens' official 
rules. Dr. Sommers said "The good thing about this sport 
is that everyone gets to play." 

He also notes that the sport is fast paced and very 
physical, requiring at least 25 members for adequate 
rotation. 

Although the Student Senate has offered to provide 
some funding, a possible small fee may be required for 
shirts. 

Dr. Sommers has looked into rotating equipment 
from other colleges and hopes to be able to provide some 
equipment for players that need it. 

The success of this new club is dependent on the turn 
out of CCCC students with a sincere desire to participate 
in an exciting and challenging sport. 

More information may be obtained by contacting Dr. 
Richard Sommers in N234, Ext. 3 17 or at 790-093 1 in the 
evenings. 



Faculty Commentary: Professor Brenda Boleyn 



'We are a college dedicated to the notion of opportunity' 



Greetings to all our students. Labor day just past - 
opening day of school - a fresh brigjht academic year before 
us - classrooms filled with a new mix of interesting people. 
For me, even after all these years, this annual happening 
remains a tingling optimistic time. 

We are a college dedicated to the notion of opportunity - 
- opportunity for you. In the spirit of enthusiastic welcome 
for '93-'94, I'd like to use this space to comment on a couple 
of simple maxims: 
1 . THE FUTURE ISN'T WHAT IT USED TO BE 

Labor Day evokes thoughts of the American workplace 
and 'gainful employment,' a goal for most of us. With some 
luck (and preparation!) that employment will coincide with 
productive and meaningfiil work. 

Ah, but how to get there from here? 

Students of the '90 's are witness to a swirl (maelstrom?) 
of shifting expectations in the workplace, perhaps unnerving 
and intimidating, but also exciting and stimulating as new 
fields of endeavor present themselves. 

In the '60's Alvin Toffler wrote a book entitled. Future 
Shock, in which he addressed the pace at which people were 
expected to absorb and adjust to changing conditions. That 
pace has certainly not slowed down any during the past 30 
years. 



Advances in science and technology have already set the 
stage for dramaticnewopportunitiesin the nextcentury. But 
even as the old gives way to the new, a solid core of academic 
expression is what provides the foundation and confidence 
upon which to build this future. 

You have come to the right place. This college has a fine 
'trackrecord' inpreparingstudentsforthefiiture. With your 
commitment, dedication, and participation, we'll make a 
great team. Go for it! 

2. THERE IS ONLY ONE JUSTICE IN LIFE: EVERY- 
BODY GETS A 24-HR DAY! 

That one I think you can count on. But it's the only one. 
Time and energy are among your most valuable assets. And 
budgeting them may very well be your greatest challenge. 

Some folks travel through life with economic burdens, 
having been genuinely 'shortchanged' by some fiictor(s) of 
unfairness somewhere along the line. Others seem to ride the 
crest ofbenefit and good fortune far beyond the deservedness 
of any single individual. 

We are here to help you make the most of yoitf resources 
and to get the most from your 24-hr day. You can be sure it 
will be different from that of anyone else, especially true at 
a community college. Our classrooms are much enriched by 





, ^ .« 





fhoto fcr iemlf Beltnef 

the different lives of those who come here. Share and absorb 
— you'll not regret it. 

This is a wonderful place to be a teacher. I hope it is also 
a wonderful place to be a student. 

Have a very good '93-'94. 
Editor's note: Professor Boleyn has been teaching biology 
and environmental science at CCCC since 1971, 



Features 



MainSheet September 23, 1993 Page 5 



O'Neil Center builds confidence 



by Erica Mathetvs 

A legally blind student at CCCC, took a computer key- 
boarding class this summer. While the rest of the students 
practice their drills, Dean Almeida worked in the O'Neill 
Center lab with a dictaphone and talking computer. As he 
typed in his lesson, the synthesized voice named Perfect Paul 
droned back each keystroke . Perfect Paul let Almeida know 
how he did as he typed. 

Almeida is just one of the growing mmiber of students 
with disabilities that use the new O'Neill Center for Disabil- 
ity Services. The center was named in honor of and estab- 
lished with fUnds provided by amemorial gift from the estate 
of Alice M. O'NeUI, a former Cape summer resident. 

According to Joyce Chasson, the director of the center, 
the O'Neill Center offers a wide range of support services for 
individuals with disabilities who use the college's programs 
and facilities. "Each student is assessed on an individual 
basis to determine what types of support services they may 
need to complete their coiu'ses successfiilly," Chasson said. 
Any documented student with a mental or physical impair- 
mentmayqualify to use the Center. Support services include 
providing readers, note takers, interpreters, taped or braille 
materials, orientation to the campus, course advisement, 
handicapped parking, tutoring, and exam modifications. 

Providing equal access to courses is a coordinated effort 
involving a strong commitment from the student and the 
feculty. "I'm not sure people are aware of the enormous 
amount of energy the disabled student must expend just to get 
through the day,"Chasson said. For example in Almeida's 
case, he not only had to leam the keyboard, but had to learn 
bow to use the adaptive equipment so he could read the 
computer screen with the speech output. Chasson added that 
many of her students have adult onset disabilities. Learning 
an entire new way of doing things when you are in your 30's 
and 40's is extremely difficult. 

The O'Neill Center staff works closely with the faculty to 
develop the strategies necessary to handle the course curricu- 
lum. Nancy Buckley, Almeida's computer instructor, rede- 
signed his lessons in a format that would work best for him. 
The Center staff then taped the materials for use with a 
dictaphone and trained him on the equipment. Buckley also 



had a hearing impaired woman in the same class. Buckley 
had to be certain to face her when she lectured so the student 
could lip read the information. "It was a real challenge," 
Buckley said, "but they both worked so hard it was just as 
rewarding for me." 

A key component of the O'Neill Center is the Adaptive 
Compute Technology Lab. The lab, funded through a grant 
received by the University of Massachusetts Boston campus, 
offers a wide variety of equipment to meet the needs of the 
disabled. In addition to the voice synthesizing programs, the 
lab has hardware and software that will enlarge text, scan 
materials onto a computer screen, and assist students with 
limited mobility. 

Chris Thew, a computer science major at CCCC, runs the 
adaptive lab. According to Thew, most of the students in the 
lab have limited mobility, are visually impaired or have 
learning disabilities. Some learning disabled students leam 
best by hearing, rather than seeing the information. Jeanette 
Smith, a student in the learning disabilities program coordi- 
nated by Dr. Richard Sommers, uses Perfect Paul for her 
papers. "It helps to hear the word and see it at the same time 
when I type it on the screen," Smith explained. Listening 
devices, talking spell checkers and calculators, and adjust- 
able tables are also available 

Although technology is critical to independence, a great 
deal of time is spent working with students to help them 
develop the confidence and life skills necessary to accom- 
plish their goals. "We try to build on the student's strengths, 
and focus on ability, not disability," Chasson said. The staff 
has assisted 45 students since the beginning of 1993 with 
disabilities ranging from arthritis to deafness. In addition, 
the Center promotes awareness both on and off the campus 
and acts as a resource to community residents. Referrals 
come from aniunber of sources including the Mass Rehabili- 
tation Commission, Mass Commission for the BUnd, faculty, 
and other departments at CCCC. For more information about 
the Center's services, contact the college at 362-2131, Ext. 
337. 



EARN YOUR 4 YEAR COLLEGE 
DEGREE ON CAPE COD 



Finish your Associate Degree at 
Cape Cod Community College, 

then 

..pursue undergraduate 
programs in Business, Liberal 
Studies or Criminal Justice. 
Continue working toward a 
Masters in Business Administration, 
a Masters in Public Administration, 
or a Master of Science in Criminal 
Justice Administration. 




lUeGtern 
new England 
College 

3169 Main Street 
Barnstable Village 
508-362-4936 



Change Yourself 

by Erica Mathews 

Last spring, I got the "So what are you doing after 
high school?," drill. I answered that I'd be attending 
CCCC. The response ranged from "Oh..., but you could 
get into a 'real college'" to "Oh, good idea! ." 

One comment that kept me awake at night was; 
"CCCC is high school all over again." That was enough 
to make me pack my bags and head off to a "real College." 

However, by then it was summer. I examined my 
options: endure two years of high school like college or 
devote all my time to a minimum wage job. I decided not 
to back out on my original plan. "I hope it's not like a 
high school," I told my mother. "Well, it may be," she 
replied. "So if you want to get anything out of it, youhave 
to change yourself" She was talking about a total make 
over: attitude as well as wardrobe. 

Her words kept playing in my head as I climb 
CCCC's never ending stairs. I casually surveyed my new 
classmates, it was quickly apparent to me the rumors were 
true. Change yourself, I thought. 

After spending nearly a week at this school, I ' m more 
qualified to make judgement. While the social climate 
may scream "high school," the underlying approach to 
academics doesn't. Ifyourheretoleam.fme. Ifyournot, 
goodbye. It's your choice. I learned that the hard way, as 
usual. I know..."change yourself" CCCC is the first 
school I've attended where some of the students can be 
mistaken for teachers. That alone gives this college 
character unlike any high school. Another difference is 
that we all are on our own schedules. I still find it strange 
that when my school day is beginning, other students are 
finished, and vice- versa. And where are the fist fights, the 
cat fights, and the cliques? What happened to the "good 
ol' days" ofpetty name-calling andherdmentality? Injiss 
fliose like I miss being in school by 7:30 a.m. 

Even writing this article showed me that CCCC is not 
like high school. When I offered to be part of the 
MainSheet, I was told that I could submit something by 
Tuesday morning. "This Tuesday morning?!," I ahnost 
blurted (1 was hoping she meant the final Tuesday of 
October). I'm used to beinggivenanentiremonth to write 
a 500 word commentary on things like senior privileges. 

A few hours prior to writing this article, I was 
thinking up all the excuses I would tell the editor as to why 
I didn't write anything. Then a little voice said to me, 
"change yourself" I have a feeling I'll be hearing a lot 
more from this voice in the coming years. 



Disability 



Etiquette 



Myths about people with disabilities 

1. People with disabilities are brave and courageous. 

2. AH wheelchair users are sickly and chronically ill. 

3. All persons with hearing disabilities can read lips. 

4. People who are blind acquire a sixth sense. 

5. People with disabilities are more comfortable with their 
own kind. 

6. Nondisabled persons are obligated to take care of people 
with disabilities. 

7. Curious children should never be allowed to ask people 
about their disabilities. 

8. The lives of people with disabilities are totally different 
from the lives of everyone else. 

9 . It is acceptable for people to park in handicapped parking 
areas for a short time. 

10. Most people with disabilities always need help. 

1 1 . People with disabilities are imable to have sex. 

12. There is nothing any one person can do to help eliminate 
the barriers confronting people with disabilities. 

Here are a few common sense suggestions when communi- 
cating with individuals with disabilities: 

1. Do shake hands! If the person is blind, say something 
like,"Shall we shake hands?" People with limited hand use 
or who have an artificial hand should not be excluded from 
this common courtesy. 

2. Speak DKECTLY to the person with the disability and 
not through the companion who may be along. 

3. Use words such as "see you soon" or "I must be running 
along." these words will not be offensive to people who are 
blind or mobility impaired. 

4. If you offer to help, WATT until the offer is accepted. Do 
not assume all people with disabilities need assistance. 
♦Courtesy of the O'Neill Center 



Ilfltt 



WHWMWPiWiBa 



MainSheet Septmber 23, 1993 Page 6 



Focus 



Expecting... birth control pills over the counter 



by Sheila Johnson 

Any woman who considers using oral contraceptives 
should understand the benefits and risks of this form of birth 
control. Oral contraceptives are used to prevent pregnancy 
and are more effective than other non-surgical methods of 
birth control. When they are taken correctly the chance of 
becoming pregnant is less than 1 % . Typical failure rates are 
3% per year.. 

Although the pill has been proven as the most effective 
form of birth control, it poses a high risk for women with high 
blood pressure, certain cancers and diabetes, and for smokers 
over 35 years old. 

According to Rugby Laboratories, women with the fol- 
lowing conditions should not use the pill at all: History of 
heart attack or stroke, blood clots in the legs, brain, lungs or 
eyes, chest pain, known or suspected breast cancer or cancer 
of the uterus, cervix, or vagina, imexplained vaginal bleed- 
ing, yellowing of the whites of the eyes or skin during 
pregnancy or previous use of the pill, liver tumor, known or 
suspected pregnancy. 

Women with any of the following conditions should be 
checked often by a health care provider to avoid problems; 



Diabetes, breast nodules, high cholesterol, high blood pres- 
sure, migraines, mental depression, gall bladder, heart or 
kidney disease, and history of scanty or irregular menstrual 
periods. 

The real question at issue is should the pill be available 
without prescription? Do women know enough to take care 
of their own bodies? 

According to the Wall Street Journal, supporters say that 
making the pill available over the counter will reduce 
unwanted pregnancy and abortions, and help to increase 
women's reproductive independence. 

Opponents argue that the only time a women goes to see 
a doctor is obtain the pill. It is during these visits that medical 
problems are detected. 

"Physicians loose the opportunity to discuss side effects," 
said Daniel Riddick, President of the American Fertility 
Society, and head of the American College of Obstetricians 
and Gynecologists practice committee. "Without coimsel, 
women may stop taking the pill due to uncomfortable side 
effects, which would lead to more unwanted pregnancies." 
"It's too potent a drug for over the counter," said 



Sidney Wolfe, Director of Public Citizens Health Research 
Group. Mr. Wolfe contends that removing the prescription 
regulation would increase the use of pills by women who are 
in potential danger. 

According to the Wall Street Journal, opponents feel a 
switch would not only increase side effects, it would also cost 
more money for women since Medicaid will not cover pills 
unprescribed. Forcing women who regularly receive pills 
free or at low cost to pay $20-25 a month out of their own 
pockets. 

"A birth control prescription is the poor woman's ticket 
to health care." said Cynthia Pearson, Program Director of 
National Women's Health Network, who opposes the pill 
going over the counter. 

Supporters feel that the switch will save women money. 
The average gynecological visit is 2q>proximately $80, and 
more than one is advised per year. Although, birth control 
pills are now expensive ($20-25 per month) there is talk of 
the price coming down after the switch to over the counter. 



Focus Survey: 

Should birth control pills be available with out a prescription? 









JajTiie AVood 
Liberal Arts 

"Yeali. because of the popula- 
tion problem," 



Margueite Lloyd 
EMT 

"Yes, everybody needs its." 



Kevin Kelly 
EMT 

"It is a hard question to 
answer. Yes, but it should be 
done with education." 



Lisa Metcalf 

Sociolgy 

"No, certain doses can be 

different for different people, 

and that can be dangerous." 



Pat Cox 
Criminal Justice 

"Yes, no hassle to it!" 



fliatn if HmOc Bmh 



Both sides of the issue 



The choice should 
be up to you 

by Darlene Mokrycki 

Are women really incompetent and ineffectual managers of their own bodies? Are we 
so ignorant about health issues that we are deemed inept? The Federal Drug Administration 
i^parently has thought so up until recent days. 

The controversy over whether or not to allow "bkth control" preparations to be ])urchased 
"over the counter" has everyone from both sides of the coin in an uproar. 

While there will undoubtedly be some drawbacks, the overwhelming benefit to the 
normal healthy non-smoking woman of early childbearing age must be considered in this 
decision. 

For the average young non-smoking woman the benefits far outweigh the risks. 
Economically, a Gynecologist's fee for an office visit is in the $70 to $80 range. Two visits . 
per year are often required when a woman is on the pill. These results in costs of $140.00 
per year plus the costs of the piU which can be as high as $25.00 per month, oranother $300.00 
per year. 

There are many poor women who do not use birth control pills because of inaccessibility 
plus these prohibitive medical costs. In developing countries, birth control pills are 

routinely sold over the counter. 

It is hoped tlist the sale of the pill as a non prescription drug will result in greater 
availability to the poor, which could result in the lowering of the rate of imwanted pregnancy 
among the disadvantaged and also decreasing the need for the use of abortion as a birth 
control method, a practice which has both bidden and overt costs to the woman and the 
community. 

Those poor women who will benefit from greater accessibility, are the group who 
generally suffer higher infant mortality rates, higher rates of drug addicted and stillborn 
infants. Not only are these problems heartbreaking for the young mothers involved, but they 
become a financial burden for the entire community. 

According to a recent network news feature, it is estimated that the cost of the birth 
control pill will come down if the pill is made into an over the counter drug. 

The wait for a gynecological examination appointment wiU no longer be one to two 
months long, as it is in some conununities. The doctor's time will be freed up for more lu-gent 
matters. 



Any woman who canread well enough to understand the instructions and contraindications 
should safely be able to use the pill she has purchased over the counter, aud should be allowed 
to do so. 

Birth control pills should be 
regulated 

by Michde Queenan 

In the October 1 993 issue of Good Housekeeping magazine there is an article entitled 1 00 
most prescribed pills-plus side effects. Within the top 100 pills there was five different 
brands of birth control pills. Each brand of birth control pill contains varying amounts of 
estrogen and progesterone, and some pills are progesterone only. With so many different 
brands available how are women to know what is right for them? i 

If birth control pills become available without a prescription many devastating results 
may occur. Women who are over 35 and smoke should not be using birth control pills. If 
available without a prescription these women would be at great risk. If women who are using 
birth control pills don't follow the directions properly, and forget to take a pill that day, an 
alternative form of birth control must be used to ensttfe proper protection. 

For many women the only way they will receive a gynecological check-up is when they 
are on birth control pills or some other prescribed form of birth control. Most people will 
not go to a doctor when they can buy something over the coimter without a prescription. If 
birth control pills become unregulated this will leave many women to go unchecked for 
cervical cancer. 

The list of side effects for birth control pills is very long. Some of the side effects women 
suffer from are migraines, high blood pressure, or if the women has taken birth control pills 
for more than 10 years birth control pills should be avoided, and an alternative method of 
birth control should be used. If birth control pUls are available without a prescription these 
women will have uncontrolled access possibly with devastating results. 

No one brand of birth control pill with be right for every women, and never will be. 
Everyone has their own chemical make-up. Just because one pill works for one person that 
doesn't mean it will work for someone else. i 

Any kind of medication with so many variables needs to be strictly regulated. 



MainSheet September 23, 1993 Page 7 



Women's Page 

Women grasp your purses: Are you paying too much? 



by Katie Bonis 

A woman and a man walk into a dry cleaners. Although 
both have a basic white cotton shirt laundered, the woman is 
charged 27 percent more than the man. This is not an 
uncommon event. Women are charged more for haircuts, 
clothing alterations, health care products, cars, car repairs, 
clothing, and medical care. These pricing practices have 
been around for so many years that many women have never 
noticed. 

The New York City Department of Consumer Affairs 
reported, in a book titled Gypped By Gender, two out of 
every three hairdressers surveyed charged women 25 percent 
more than men for a wash, cut, and blow dry. On an average, 
women pay $20 and men only $ 1 6 for these services. Many 
may argue that women are fussier than men and the liair cut 
itself takes longer. But many women have short hair; yet, 
. they still pay more than a man who has the same amount of 
hair, or more. 



In a December 1992 interview by the Boston Globe, 
Mario Russo, a salon owner, said "We schedule just as much 
time for a man as for a woman. It takes just as much time to 
do a man's haircut as it does to do a woman's. Most men's 
cut's are short, but there are just as many details to attend to 
as a woman's. There's the back of the neck, the sideburns, 
etc." 

Unknown to many consumers, Massachusetts has a law 
prohibiting gender-based pricing, however a survey by the 
Boston Globe showed that 1 1 out of 20 salons still over- 
charged woman. 

Many men's clothing stores will alter suits and tuxedos 
for free. But women are expected to pay for even the slightest 
alteration of an evening gown. In one case in which this 
happened, two California executives sued the store for 
discriminatory pricing. Settling out of court, the company 
eliminated or reduced the prices on alterations for hems. 



sleeves, and waists in its 45 branches nationwide. This 
change would save women hundreds of dollars a year. 

Pricing discrimination may be less overt when it takes the 
form of equal prices for unequal sized meals or clothing. 
Women's clothing which is manufactured the same way as 
matching items intended for men containing less material, 
thus cost the same or more. Many restaurants' place less food 
on a plate that they prepare for a female patron , yet charge the 
same as the larger f>ortions prepared for male. 

Women are faced with a daily struggle wdth fashion. 
Women's fashions change every season. As women we are 
led to believe that they must be thin, young, and large 
breasted. For some women this is an obsession. They attend 
weight loss clubs, buy cosmetics, have breast implants, and 
some even have plastic surgery. While men only have to deal 
with slight changes in fashion such as the width of a tie, 



Katie's 
Cooking 
Corner 



Oct. is breast cancer month 




fiatt bf Sull* Jolmtm 

Cheddary Pasta and 'Vegetables* 

Prep time: 10 min. 
Cook time: 20 min. 



\ 1/2 cups dry corkscrew macaroni 

2 medium carrorts, sliced 

1 Cup broccoli flowerets 

1 large sweet red or green pepper, chopped (optional) 

1 can (10 3/4 oz.) Campbell's Cream of Celery Soup 

1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese 

1/2 cup milk 

1 tbsp prepared mustard 

1 . In a4 qt saucepan, prepare macaroni according to package 
directions. Add carrots, broccoli and pepper for last 5 min. 
of cooking time. Drain. 

2. In sauce pan, combine remaining ingredients. Over low 
heat, heat until cheese melts, stirring often. Add macaroni 
and vegetables. Heat through, stirring occasionally. 
Serves five. 

* A reprint from Mc Call's magazine. 



More than 60 percent of American women do not conduct 
self-breast examinations. 85 percent of the lumps found are 
by the women themselves. However, 80 to 85 percent of 
lumps found are cancerous. The American Cancer Society 
released the following statistics about breast cancer. 

* 1 82 thousand women will be diagnosed with breast cancer 

this year. 

*1 thousand men wiU be diagnosed wdth breast cancer this 

year. 

*46 thousand women will die from breast cancer this year. 

*300 men will die from breast cancer this year. 



Early detection is necessary for a potential cure. Diets 
high in fats have been linked to many cancers, while foods 
high in vitamins E and C may protect you. Vegetables in the 
cabbage family, celery, citrus fruits, beans, spinach, and 
seeds all produce an anti-cancer enzyme. 

Show your support, for National Breast Cancer Aware- 
ness Month by wearing apink ribbon. Ribbons can be picked 
up after October 1 st at either the adult Re-Entry office or the 
MainSheet office. Supplies are limited. 

For more information about breast cancer call 1(800)- 
lAM-AWARE. 



Health Brief: The Pap Smear 



by Katie Bonis 

Due to the high risks of cancer, doctors are now strongly 
urging women to have an annual Pap smear when becom- 
ing sexually active or turning 21 years of age, whichever 
comes first. , The Pap smear is a method for distin- 
guishing normal from abnormal cells of the vagina, uterus 
and cervix. It is the most accurate in determining cervical 



abnormalities. During the pelvic examination cervical 
tissue is taken and placed on a slide. The slide then goes to 
the cytology laboratory for an analysis. The entire proce- 
dure takes only a couple of minutes and test results are 
mailed back to the patient. If you have never had a P^ 
smear let your doctor know ahead of time. 



Classified Ad 



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Bahamas, S. Padre Island, 
Daytona. We handle bookkeeping 
you handle sales. (800) 336-2260 
Monday thru Friday 9am to 5pm 



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Get Acquainted with us 

Before You Get Acquainted 

with Each Other 

Free Pregnancy Testing 

Gynecology 

Pregnancy Termination 

Birth Control 

A private practice devoted to reproductive medicine. 

Because with some matters it's privacy that counts. 

Reasonable Fees - Evening Hours - Visa & Mastercard 

iWomanCare 



Hyannis Office 
62-68 Camp Street 
Hyaimis, MA 02601 

778-6700 



New Bedford Office 

12 Brigham Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

999-5757 



ADC Continued from pg. 2 

They should never be afraid to come in and ask for help, 

that's what we are here for." 

The ADC is located in South 1 1 1 and is open from 8:30 
to 7, Monday through Thursday, and from 8:30 to 4 on 
Fridays. 



UNPLANNED 
PREGNANCY 

Consider All Your Options.. 
We Support Your Choice. 

Counseling, Housing, and Medical 
Assistance Available. 

Call Carolyn Toll Free in Boston 

1-800-533-4346 

Confidentiality Respected 



Susan Friedman, Director 

Adult Classes 

Jazz .Tap • Ballet, all levels 




C5IQn5 



11 Enterprise Rd., Hyannis-77 1-2344 



MainSheet September 23, 1993 Page 8 



Back Page 



What^s Happening 



Seminars & 
Workshops: 

Health Professionals 
Seminar (Short- 
Term Memory Loss) 

Thursday, September 23 

from 4 to 6 p.m. 

Room C106 Commons 

Building 

General fee is$5.00,$15.00 

for professional RN's and 

social workers wishing to 

earn E.E.U.s. 

For more info .call Carla 

Priestat362-2131,ext.386 

MBTI TYPE Work- 
shops FaU '93 
Introductory work- 
shops: 

Oct 19 & 21, 2:00 - 3:00 

p.m. LI 02 

Oct. 25, 27, & 29, 12:00 - 



1:00 pjn. L102 

Nov. 8, 10, & 12, 12:00-1:00 

p.m. L102 

Nov. 30, & Dec. 2, 9:30 - 

11:00 a.m. L102 

Issues Workshops: (for 
participants who have 
taken MBTI) 

October 26, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. 
LI 02 Type and Personality 
November 8, 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. 
L 1 02 Type and Couples 
November 16, 9:30 - 10:30 
a.m.L102 Type and Learning 
December 8, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. 
LI 02 Type and Careers 

To participate in a workshop, 
sign up at the Counseling Cen- 
ter, Administration Building. 
All sessions are held in the 
Library/Learning Resources 
Center-Conference Room 
{L102). 



CCCC "Lifesaver 
Saturday" Certifica- 
tion Training 
Adult CPR, 
Chokesaver, Rescue 
Breathing 

September 25, 9:00 a.m. - 
1:00 p.m. in the CCCC gym 
Cost is S20.00, pre-registra- 
tion required 
For more info call 362-8550 

Support Groups: 
Learning Disabilities 
Support Group 

Tuesday, September 28, 
12:30- 1:45 p.m. 
Library -room 102 

Contests: 

National College Po- 
etry Contest 

Open to all college &xmiver- 



sity students desiring to have 
their poetry anthologized. 
Cash prizes will be awarded 
to the top 5 poems. Deadline 
is October 31. Contest rules 
available at the MainSheet 
office. 

The National Library 
of Poetry Contest 

To enter send one original 
poem, any subject or style to 
The National Library of Po- 
etry, 11419 Crotuidge Dr., 
P.O.Box 704-ZL Owings 
MUls, MD 21117. Entries 
shouldbepostmarkedbySep- 
tember30. New contest opens 
October 1,1993. 

Inter mural: 

All sign-up sheets for 
interraural sports are posted 
in the Life Fitness Center. 



Community 
projects: 

Take Back The Night 
Rally/Speak Out 
Against Violence 

Monday, October 11, 1993 
5 p.m. gathering at the 
Hyannis Green 

7 p.m. march down Main 
Street 

8 p.m. rally/speak out 
Organized by Independence 
House and the Clothesline 
Project 

Ice Cream Social ben- 
efiting Mass Breast 
Cancer Coalition 

October 15, 6:30 -8:30 p.m. 
Our Lady of Victory Parish 
Hall, So. Main St. Centerville 
Tickets available at any 
Puritans.Ben & Jerry's, 



Hyannis or at the door, $3 .00 

per Simdae. 

Formore info call 77 1 -2 143 



College 
Fest 

sponsored by The Bos- 
ton Globe and WBCN 
Freebies, raffles, prizes 
and Uve bands 
Saturday, October2, 12 
- 8 p.m., & Sunday, 
October 3, 12 - 6 p.m. 
Hynes Convention 
Center, 900 Boylston 
St., Boston- Admission 
$5.00 



Your activity or event 
witt be published in the 
MainSheets What's Hap- 
pening on a space avail- 
able basis. Pleasesend sub- 
missions to the MainSheet 
in the care of Cindy 
SteinmuUer. 



Woody scores again with Manhattan Murder Mystery 



Allen and Keaton team up again in a side-splitting farce 




Wow, what a difference 
a year makes! Last year 
Woody Allen made a movie 
entitled. Husbands And Wives. 
This year he made a movie 
titled, Manhattan Murder 
Mystery. What we have here 
is the difference between a 
wedding or a funeral or even 
better the difference between Ben & Jerry's ice cream and the 
Stop & Shop brand of fat-free ice milk. 

While Husbands And Wives was a great movie, it made 
you feel a little bit too much like Woody Allen's and Mia 
Farrow's psychoanalyst. In Manhattan Murder Mystery, we 
see a Woody Allen of old. Not only is Allen himself 
hysterically funny, the entire movie has an air of madcap, 
ahnost slapstick farce. 

Even when there is the usual relationship introspection, 
the mystery is still more of a comedy routine than anything 
else. Lipton (played by Allen) andhis wife (played by Diane 
Keaton) try to discover if their next door neighbor murdered 



his wife. Paranoid and wimpy Larry Lipton resists at first, 
but eventually joins the adventures as a means of keeping his 
wife Carol from having an affair vsdth their close friend Ted 
(played by Alan Alda). 

Seeing Woody Allen teamed up with Diane Keaton again 
is one of the best parts in the movie. (She may still look like 
Annie Hall, but she's a thousand more times interesting than 




Mia Farrow.) 

Allen is at his best in a scene in which he and Keaton get 
stuck in an elevator with a dead body on the roof and the 
lights go out. Always claustrophobic, hypochondriac, you 
can imagine how Allen reacts. It is one of the fuimiest scenes 
in the film and it will keep you laughing long after the scene 
is over. It felt great to laugh hard at Woody Allen again. 

For those of you who have come to expect an "other 
women temptation" for Allen's character, you won't be 



disappointed. In the movie, she comes in the form of 
Angelica Huston. Huston portrays a writer to Allen's book 
editor. Huston, who tries to seduce Allen, is rebuked. She 
must then settle for teaching Allen to play poker over lunch. 
Again, we are blessed with one of the fuimiest scenes in the 
movie as Allen shuffles the cards around while a cigarette- 
smoking Huston teaches him the nuances of the game. 

Although this movie was arefreshing change from Allen' s 
most recent work, it is not totally without flaw. Allen again 
makes use of a hand held-camera. This gives the film a 
certain realism and intensity, but may also become aimoying 
and distracting. Even when Allen is at his comic best, there 
are times when his constant neurotic banter drives you nuts, 
and you wish he would just give it a rest for a frame or two. 

If you are an old-time Woody Allen fen who has stuck by 
him through good movies and bad, you'll find Manhattan 
Murder Mystery a glimpse of the return of old Woody Allen 
we used to know and laugh at until our sides hurt. 

There ' s an ironic, fimny line towards the end of the movie 
where Larry Lipton says "I'll never again say, 'Life doesn't 
imitate art'." Well if indeed life does imitate art, then Woody 
Allen's life appears to be a little h^pier. 



University 
of the 
Arts 



Dance 
Music 

Theater Arts 
Visual Arts 



The University of the Arts offers intensive 
degree programs in acting, musical 
theater, dance, music, voice, crafts, fine 
arts, design and media arts. 



For more information contact 

Admissions Office, The University of the Arts 

320 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102 

Tel: 215-875-4808 or 1-800-272-3790 (outside 215 area code) 

Fax:215-875-5458 



III! 



H4 

X 




ffl 



-a 

o 

U 

a 
U 

o 



Free Pregnancy Testing 

Non-Judgemental 

Guidance 

Support Groups 




PQ 



298 Main Street, Hyannis 

800-439-1172 
771-1102 



Women and depression 



pages 



CD review: 
Muddy Water Blues 

page 6 



Do you think the media is 
Influencing children to commit 
violent acts? 

~11 Vo ire undecided 




International Business 
program 

page 2 



00 CCCC students were randomJy surveyed 




m SHEET 



October 7, 1993 



Issue no. 2 Volume XIII 



Cape Cod Community College West Barnstable, MA 



Distributed FREE 



Students ask, "Who will pay for benefits for full and part-time students?" 

Clinton health plan leaves Students puzzled 




pAoto bf Brian Russel 

Leo Diehl, center, and Tip O'Neill, far right, award eight nursing scholarships. 



by Beverly Delaney 

While American History is literally on the verge of "being 
made" due to President Clinton's proposed Health Care Plan, 
which was addressed to Congress last week, students wonder 
how they will be affected. 

According to Clinton, the proposed health plan will 
assure health care coverage for every American who other- 
wise would go without, regardless of previous health condi- 
tions and employment status. 

Most students agree that medical prices are out of control 
and change is long over due. Sheryle Churchill, a nursing 
student commenting on last week's televised speech, said "1 
am more in favor of the plan than opposed to it, but I'm 
curious to see who is going to pay for this. How much am 1 
going to have to pay?" 



"I am more in favor of the plan 
tlien opposed to it, but I'm curious to 



A day on the bay; a hope for the future see who is going to pay for this, how 

.... . ...-■■ 1- t^M. much am I going to have to pay?" 

Whale watch trip helps highten 



environmental awareness byDaneneMokrycid 



Twenty eager students and staff members appeared anx- 
ious to get underway aboard the Whale Watcher cruise 
sponsored by the college and subsidized by the Student 
Activity Center Saturday September 24. 

Much anticipation was in the air as the ship steamed 
towards the entrance to Cape Cod Bay just offshore of 
Provincetown. 

While enroute, the ship's naturalist discussed baleen, and 
photoplankton and explained the differences between the 
toothed whale and the baleen-type species. 

The crowd watched the horizon in anticipatory silence 
awaiting the sighting of the first "blow." And then it came- 
-at "one O'clock" first a spray some 1 feet in the air, called 
a"blow," from a beautiful Finback whale, then finally the 
animal itself appeared showing itself to the gaping assembly. 
Always an awesome sight, the animal swam just aside of the 
boat for some time, and then made a "sounding" dive arching 
its curved dorsal fin typical of this species, and disappearing 
into the depthsof the bay. 



their backs and throwingtheir flukes (tails) into the airbefore 
an audience who hooted and cheered at the sight. 

According to the naturalist these were two of under 350 
individuals of this species which remains in the world. The 
calf was one of five who were bom to the population last year. 
Of the five, only three have survived. One had been killed 
by a boat, and one expired for unknown causes. 



"Will whale watching still be pos- 
sible for future generations, or will 
the Boston Harbor cleanup project 
take its toll on Stellwagen Bank. 



As the students silently hoped that the species would 
survive, the naturalist explained that the population has not 
grown over the last 50 years even though hunting this species 
has been abandoned worldwide. A wonderful time was had 



, ' A. ' A t i\\t\ nas oeen aoauuuucu wuiiuwmc. n wuuuciim milt w<»ouau 

The animal swam just aside OI tne ^^ g,, ^^^ participants, but an unspoken question, though, 

boat for some time, and then made ^m^s. wiu whaie watching stiu be possible for future 
a "sounding" dive arching its 
curved dorsal fin typical of this 



species. 



generations, or will the Boston Harbor cleanup project take 
its toll on Stellwagen Bank. Stellwagen is the rich marine 
feeding ground a little north of Cape Cod in the bay where 
many of these whales feed? 

The controversial outfall pipe project which has been 
getting much media attention since its proposal, is still in the 
midst of litigation. Environmentalists still contend that the 



Another Finback was sighted a little later in the journey, ^ijaies will be endangered even fiirtherby the pipe'seffluent 
This animal drew some oohing and ahing from the crowd, pouring some nine miles out into the bay. Pipe supporters 

Next appeared a Minke whale. This individual was too ^^ j^g Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA) 
festandtoosmallfortheviewerstogetmuchofalookathim. spokespersons don't agree. 

Just as the captain was about to turn the ship to steam back Q^jy ,jj^g ^^^ ^^^ whether these whales will survive the 
towards Hyannis, came the highlight of the day; a North insults to their environment, and whether future generations 
Atlantic Right Whale and her calfappeared very close to the ^| j^ treated to the awesome delight of viewing these 
ship. The showy animals frolicked just at the surface of the breathtaking animals in their natural habitat, 
water for awhile and then did deep "sounding" dives arching 



going to nave to pay . 

-Sheryle Churchill, Nursing student 



The new health plan's affect on college students, or 
anyone for that matter, will vary accordingly with one 
premise, all can or will have health insurance. 

Esther Landry, Director of Health Services since 1967, is 
glad to see that the health insurance issues are at least moving 
in the right direction. "I'm deeply concerned about students 
and their access to good health care," said Ms. Landry, "and 
now those who have gone without will finally have access to 
it." Although she is skeptical that the proposed plan we hear 
about today "won't be the actual plan we see at the end of the 

tiuini^l." 

In Massachusetts, only full-time students and part-time 
students who are matriculated are eUgible to purchase the 
state's insurance plan through the school at a cost of S450.00 
with coverage only extending to accident or illness. 

Out of 429 8 students here at CCCC, that are taking courses 
fiill and part time, 1 300 have waived the health care plan, 263 
students have paid for the school insurance plan, 209 stu- 
dents haven'tpaid for their insurance yet, but are expected to 
soon, and will then be covered by the school plai^ 2523 part 
time students have no insurance coverage. 

The major concern of most people how is this "health care 
for all" plan going to be funded. Clinton's address last week 
did not go into the finer details of the matter and since there 
are still months of deliberations to be haggled over, the 
concern is a legitimate one. 

Incre&ing the competition among health and medical 
industries along with government regulations of their prices 
is the backbone to liis plan with increased taxes such as the 
Sin tax (alcohol and tobacco tax), and having employers pay 

80% for employee's health benefits will help cover the 37 
million not covered now, according to the Boston Globe. 

The new health plan is going to affect everyone from not 
only the medical stand point, but the nation's economy as 
well. According to James Carville, Clinton's political strat- 
egist, "This is the most relevant piece of domestic legislation 
that the Congress will have debated in our entire history. 
That's abig statement, but it's true. The economic numbers, 
the number of people involved - it ain't chopped hver." 



mmumtimuim 



page 2 MainSheet October 7, 1993 



Campus News 



The lifestyles of the rainforest 

Mary Kelsey explains life in a rainforest during the first "Brown Bag" luncheon 

by Darlene Mokrycki 



Many Americans have 
a distorted view of what 
goes on in the tropical rain 
forests of Central America. 
Farmers, gold miners, 
foresters, and many others 
live in harmony within the 
forest, 

Mary Kelsey, a Fulbright 
scholar and former professor 
here, presented an illustrated 
lecture on the subject at the 
Tilden Arts Center on Thurs- 
day, September 23. 

During the "Brown Bag 
Lunch," Ms. Kelsey shared 
her images of Central 
America with students and 
staff. She recently returned 
from a year-long stay in Cen- 
tral America. She focused on the lowland rain forests of 
Honduras, Guatemala and Costa Rica, where she studied the 
people and their relationships to the rain forest. 

"Ms. Kelsey seemed to really enjoy her research," said 
Beverly Delaney, a Liberal Arts major. "She could have 
given a complicated view on the subject but instead she told 
it on a personal level, to better tmderstand the customs and 
life style of the people." 

As an artist, she sketched the people and their interactions 
with the rain forest around them. Her drawings reflected the 
people, their culture, their livelihoods and their land. She 
said that they were extremely interested in her drawings of 




pJtatD bi Beverlf Bebitef 

their people, especially watching her do the actual drawing. 

She also photographed the local people in their environ- 
ment. Her slides showed typical vegetation, people, dress 
and activities of the land. 

Members of the audience commented that her sketches 
were insightful and interesting, and her photographs were 
inspiring. Ms. Kelsey conveyed to the audience that she had 
obtained a real feeling for the people and their dependence 
upon the forest for various aspects of their lives, and at least 
an appreciation for the plight of those people who make their 
livelihood from and around the tain forests. 



Physical Therapist Assistant Program opens doors 



by Michele Queenan 

Responding to a local need, CCCC has begun an Asso- 
ciate Degree program this fall which will qualify students to 
take the state licensmg test to practice as Physical Therapist 
Assistants in area health care settings. 

Robin Mclntyre of Bourne has been employed to direct 
the program which has been approved by the Massachusetts 
Higher Education Coordinating Council and CCCC trustees. 
The program, partly fimded by the Cape Cod, Martha's 
Vineyard and Nantucket Regional Employment Board 
(JTEC), is part of the CCCC Department of Health and 
Human Services. 

Ms. Mclntyre earned a Bachelor's Degree in Physical 
Therapy from Ithaca College and a Master's Degree in 
Physical Therapy from the University of Southern Califor- 
nia. 

There are 25 students enrolled in the program. This year 
21 of those students are from the JTEC program, and the 
other foiu- are being funded by Cape Cod Hospital. 

There are limited spaces for this program. However, 
there will be no waiting list. Applicants must reapply next 
fall for entrance into the program. 

The prerequisites for acceptance into the program are 



high school or college algebra, high school or college 
chemistry with alab (which must have been taken within the 
last five years), and a letter stating why you would like to be 
in the program. Other considerations include evaluation of 
related work experience, volunteer work, and/or observation 
experience. Once the decision has been made the selected 
group will be interviewed by the physical therapy faculty. 

Students in the Physical Therapist Assistant program 
will be required to complete all general education require- 
ments (GER), as well as 13 specialized physical therapy 
courses. There will be three one month clinical rotations 
required. The rotations can be done any where in southeast- 
em Massachusetts, and can include such areas as hospitals, 
home care, schools, sports medicine, or extended care facili- 
ties. Any where a Licensed Physical Therapist works a 
Physical Therapist Assistant can woric. 

The job outlook on Cape Cod may be limited, although, 
elsewhere jobs are readily available. The salary for new 
graduates range from, $20-23,000 yearly on Cape Cod. 

Anyone who has an interest in the program may contact 
Robin Mclntyre at 362-21 3 1 ext.33 5, or drop by her office in 
the North building room 201 . 



A chance to broaden horizons 



by Kevin Moullon 

Students will finally get the chance to get their feet wet in 
the waters of the international business world. 

In past semesters the college'sbusiness courseshave been 
centered more around the domestic forefront, and have not 
integrated the importance of economic growth in places such 
as Europe and Japan. This is due, in large part, to a failure 
by the texts provided to refer to the growing international 
scene. Change is imminent, however. During the semester 
break, the college is going to offer students a hands-on 3 
credit course in international business. 

The course, which is a 300 level class entitled "Interna- 
tional Business- A European Perspective," is to be offered in 
Paris at the Institut de Gestion Sociale. 

Dr. Neil R. Cronin and Professor Gail McCormick de- 
signed the course in an effort to provide students with direct 
contact to contemporaries studying business courses as well 
as site visits to a variety of European business places. The 
course will strongly emphasize doing business overseas, 
currency issues, cultural issues, comparative marketing tech- 
niques, and basic international law. 

Dr. Cronin, who is a former president of Berlitz Interna- 
tional Language Company, is now involved in business 
consulting in France and other parts of Europe. He expressed 
some initial concerns about the course but seems very 



optimistic about how rewarding it could be for students. 

"Originally I worried about how much of an opportunity 
there was for students on Cape Cod to be exposed to the 
international business scene. I dismissed this thought, 
though, because many of the larger companies on the Cape 
such as the Christmas Tree Shops do the majority of their 
business with foreign countries," said Dr. Cronin. He also 
added, "This is a great chance for students to make coimec- 
tions with European business people and students which they 
can hold onto and hopefiilly prosper from in fiiture years." 

Dr. Cronin also cited the course as a direct reflection of the 
ideas and actions of President Krauss to expand the horizons 
of the college, so that it is more globally oriented. 

The course itself will begin in Paris on January 3rd and run 
through January 15th, 1994. The estimated cost for the 
course is $2,250.00 and will include tuition, round-trip 
airfare from Logan, lodging, meals, tours and local travel. 
The course vwU also be offered on a non-credit basis for 
around $1850.00. 

The first of three informational sessions for students 
interested in the course will be held on Tuesday, October 12 
at 2 p.m. in CGI 11. Anyone with fiulher questions may 
contact either Dr. Cronin, or Professor McCormick. 



News Briefs 



Leo Diehl Foundation awards eight 
nursing scholarships 

The eight $3,000 scholarships are awarded to 
students who meet the criteria, as determined by 
the Financial Aid office and the nursing depart- 
ment. The scholarships were awarded at the 
annual Diehl Foundation Scholarship Luncheon 
held Wednesday September 29. Recipients for 
the 1993 awards are sophomores Marian Tansey 
and Joaime Damon; Freshmen Joann Silva, Sheila 
Hopkins, Cindy Burke, Jennifer Lestat, Catherine 
Clark, and Kathleen Tarr. 

Liz Walker to speak at Indepen- 
dence House annual meeting 

Walker is co-anchor ofWBZ News 4. The meet- 
ing and luncheon will be held on Friday October 
15,11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Cape Codder Hotel, 
route 132, Hyannis. Tickets are $20. For more 
information call Independence House at (508) 
771-6507. 

Take Back The Night march 

Independence House and the Clothesline Project 
present the annual event on Monday, October 1 1 , 
at the Village Green in Hyannis. Tlie gathering 
starts at 5 p.m. followed by a 7 p.m. march down 
Main St and also an 8 p.m. rally at the Village 
Green. For more information call the Indepen- 
dence House at 77 1-6507. 

Higgins Gallery opens 

The gallery will exhibit 'Documents pour Ar- 
tistes;' Atget's Paris, Abbott's New York, photo- 
graphs by French photographer Eugene Atget and 
the recently deceased American photographer 
Berenice Abbott. The exhibition, which includes 
rare, vintage black and -white photographs will 
begin on Friday, October 8 and run through Satur- 
day, November 27. The opening reception will be 
held from 5 to 7 p.m.. For more information call 
(508)362-2131. 

Earthworkers club 

The Earthworkers is a group of students working 
for positive environmental changes. All students 
are encouraged to join. Please contact Professor 
Boleyn's office in the science building room 101. 
Meetings to be announced. 

Sea Change suspends publication 

The CCCC magazine of the arts will temporarily 
suspend publication. There is currentiy no art 
advisor to the magazine. All submissions to the 
magazine will be considered for the spring 1995 
edition. Please continue to submit fiction, poetry, 
and art work. For infonnation contact Professor 
McGraw, North 237, ext 466. 

Nature observation course offered 

The non-credit course. The Art and Philosophy of 
Nature Observation, will be offered on four Satur- 
day afternoons during October. Registration is 
daily at the administration building or by phoning 
362-8550. 




ance 



bd Community College 
!ents in Paris January 1994! 

For More Infonnation meet in CGll 
October 12, 2p.in. or call ext. 361 




Campus News 



Mainsheet October 1, 1993 page 3 




ftitttn tr "I*" Outsell 

Professor Lauren Heyl tutors students in the Math Lab 



Gay and lesbian group 
formed 

by Nancy Brennan 

John French, Director of Student Activities, has organized 
the Gayand Lesbian Discussion Group, which will meet each 

Tuesday in CI 06 at 1 p.m. 

Mr. French started the group at the beginning of the 
semester with the intention of giving the gay and lesbian 
members of the college a place to turn for information, 
discussion of issues, and also, to let gay and lesbians know 
that there is support for them on this campus. 

The first priority of the group, Mr. French says, "Is to deal 
with issues related to raising awareness and embracing 
diversity." Mr. French also said that the group creates a 
"support base" for individuals. 

Since the first meeting, which was held September 14, 
about 20 students have attended the weekly sessions, and the 
group will be seeking club status through the Student Activi- 
ties office. 

Mr. French says the group will be open "to persons 
concerned with ensiuing a safe and nurturing environment 
for all students." Mr. French can be contacted in the Student 
Activities office, or by calling 362-2131, extension 320, for 
further information. 



Phi Theta Kappa Inducts New Members Multicultural Festival 

brings 
church to college 



)iy Jack Higgins 

On Sunday, October 3rd, at 1 : 3 p .m . in the Tilden Arts 
Center Auditorium, there was an induction of new members 
Into Alpha Upsllon Mu, CCCC's own chapter of Phi Theta 
Kappa. Phi Theta Kappa is the National Honor Society for 
two year colleges. 

Each candidate for membership has completed twelve 
semester hours of associates degree work, with a grade point 
average of 3.5 or above, has adhered to the school conduct 
code, and possesses recognized qualities of citizenship. 

Although academic achievement is at the forefiront of 
the societies's priorities, Phi Theta Kappa advocates com- 
munity involvement, leadership, and lending a helping hand. 
A few of the activities being promoted by this year's officers 
For the future at the college is a "partners" program which 



will offer incoming students, with emphasis on non-tradi- 
tional students, one-on-one guidance and support firom a"big 
brother" or "big sister" Phi Beta Kappa" member. 

Also in the works is a- tutoring outreach program 
sponsored by Phi Theta Kappa to some of our local high 
schools. Some members are tutors here at the A.D.C. and the 
Math Lab. Several other programs are in the planning stages 
and will be announced as they evolve. 

Anyone who washes to learn more about the society 
may contact the chapter advisor. Professor Marcia Dalton, 
North building, English Department. 

Phi Theta Kappa officers include Jeanne Heroux, John 
Ahem, Thomas Edwards, AngelaHennemuth, and Kimberly 
Taylor. 



I ■ 


i 




^ EARN YOUR 4 YEAR COLLEGE 
"^ DEGREE ON CAPE COD 

Finish your Associate Degree at 

Cape Cod Community College, 

then 

..pursue undergraduate 

programs in Business, Liberal 
^ Studies or Criminal Justice. 
^^ Continue working toward a 


^ 






Masters in Business Administration^ 
a Masters in Public Administration, 
or a Master of Science in Criminal 
Justice Administration. 




^..:: \ \ 1 






\\ 1 




^"-^ tiiofvtopn 




7 ■kA...rnMlAn J 






-=T HVUf ■.IIUIHIHU 1 


1^1 




1 


^ College 

1 JV 3169 Main street 
1 w\ Barnstable Village 
J fl 508-362-4936 



Dance, music, and art will meet religion and social action 
in the service of good community relations during "Discov- 
ering Connections," a multicultural festival to be held on the 
College campus October 10, 1-5 p.m.. 

ITie festival is sponsored by the Cape Cod Council of 
Churches. Admission is firee and people of all ages are 
invited. 

Visitors to the festival will be able to select fi-om a variety 
of activities. Ethnic groups will offer dancing and singing 
performances: religious congregations (Baha'i, Jewish, and 
Christian) and community relations groups will display 
information about their projects; gifts and finger foods will 
be available for sale. There will also be a video theater. 

"Discovering Connections" is the Council of Churches' 
expression of support for the Cape Cod Campaign for Civil 
Rights, whose goals is to eliminate hate crimes. 

The Council's hope is that the festival will strengthen the 
ties between people of good will, and present a united front 
against prejudice and the violence that results from it. 

The festival is not the first collaboration of the Council 
and the College. Each year, along with the Jewish Federa- 
tion, they co-sponsor the Yom Hashoah observance (a com- 
memoration of the Holocaust). 

"Discovering Connections" still needs volunteers, includ- 
ing hosts and performers of ethnic dance and music. To 
volunteer or further information, contact the festival coordi- 
nator, Meg Mecke, at 394-1008, or the council of Churches 
office at 775-5073. 



rr 



H 



Free Pregnancy Testing 
Non-Judgemental 
Guidance 
Support Groups 




V^ 



CQ 



298 Main Street, Hyannis 
800-439-1172 
771-1102 



y 



MMW 



page 4 MainSheet October 7, 1993 



Editorial 



A 'groovy' place to hang 




Viewpoint 

by Charles Thibodeau 

My column this week was to 
be on the Lakewood, Califor- 
nia "Spur Posse" gang of male 
high school students who award 
themselves one point for every 
female they seduce. Some posse members claim to have had 



Shameful behavior isn't limited to other 
people's neighborhoods 



you are watcliing these kids fill their lungs and bloodstream 
with the poisons from cigarettes, notice that some of them are 
moving their arms like swimmers in slow motion. They are 
reaching for that vision, hallucinating, tripping on acid. 
Some of these kids are taking as many as four tabs of LSD at 
a whack. Did you notice that bottle of Visine that is being 

sexual intercourse with dozens of females. One hunk of passed around? Kids that bum, smoke dope, are getting the 

burning love boasted a score of 66. 1 was going to wave my redout. 

nasty pen at those parents who found nothing wrong with Around ten o'clock "The Fleet" starts piling into their cars. 

their son's behavior, but instead I would like to talk about It's Saturday night, and there is always a party on Saturday 

what is going on in my own back yard. night, somewhere between Wellfleet and Brewster. Tonight 



Well fleet is my back yard, a 
small fishing village whose 
streets are lined with white 
Victorian and Georgian pe- 
riod houses filled with white 
middle and white upper class 
families. 

In the center of Wellfleet 
stands our town hall guarded 

by two tall blue spruce trees, 

one old cannon with its barrel 

filled with gray cement, and two park benches, shadowed by 
a giant maple tree. The two park benches sit at the foot of the 
brick walk that leads to the town hall and is the gathering spot 
for the teenagers and young adults of Wellfleet, who for 



'Before the night is finished 
some of these so-called 
"bitches" will have sex with 
more than one boy.' 



the party is here in Wellfleet, 

an upperclassman from Nauset 

High is throwing a Jag. Along 

with a keg of beer and some 

good smoke there will be lots 

of "bitches." Before the night 

is fmished some of these so 

called bitches will have sex 

with more than one boy, and 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^ more than likely it will be oral 

sex. You might ask, how do I 

know so much about what is going on in "The Fleet?" Most 

everyone in town knows what's up in "The Fleet." 

The boys of Nauset High dc«'t keep a nmning account like 
the boys of Lakewood "Spur Posse," as to how many times 
they trip, burn, jag, or get oral sex, but they sure do tell 



accomplishments unrecordedhave crowned themselves"The 

Fleet." When you drive into WeUfleet^you can't miss "The everyone about it. The morning after the night before there 

Fleet," they'll be standing there in front of town hall under is belly laughter in Fleet Center. 



that giant maple tree, dressed to the nines in the latest Stussy 
fashions. They age from twelve to twenty, and are not all 
from Wellfleet. 

Wellfleet has become the groovy place to hang out for the 
kids from Nauset High. Fleet Center is the place where kids 
can easily get booze, drugs, and sex. "The Fleet" is all male, 
although there are plenty of young women, who are referred 
to as "bitches," hanging around. 

If you take time to observe "The Fleet" hanging out you 
will notice that most of them are smoking cigarettes. While 



It makes my skin crawl to think of the way kids disrespect 
each other and themselves. Our young male cotmterparts are 
taught to be cruel and insensitive. Fathers need to take 
immediate action to restore some moral fiber in their sons. 
Men control most of the power in America. They control the 
Wealth, they control the Military, they control the Govern- 
ment. But what they really need is some Self Control. Men 
need to grow up and leave that little boy behind. Men need 
to grow up and start to project responsible images for our 
sons. 



MdTN SHEET 



Editorial Staff 

Sheila Johnson 
Michele Queenan 
Kevin Moulton 



Beverly Delaney 
David Whitmore 
Jack Higgins 
Tom Redmond 
Katie Banis 
Vincent Raimo 
Roy Rider 
Charles Thibodeau 
Cindy Steinmueller 
Darlene Mokrycki 
William Babner 



Editor in chief 

Focus 

Features 

Photos 

Photos 

Entertainment 

Campus News/ 

FocusAVomen's Issues 

Graphics 

Advertising 

Editorial/ Opinion 

Campus Life 

Copy 

Faculty Advisor 



Contributors 



Sherry Aheam 
Michele Auclair 
Laurel Bloom 
Nancy Brennan 
Jon Coutino 
Sarah Curley 
Jennifer Dixon 
Brian Ford 
Evan Foster 
Amy Gold 



Ada Kelly 

Robert Koenig 

Terri Ladd 

Martha Love 

Erica Mathews 

Melissa Phaneuf 

Walter Rivieccio 

Erin Rose 

Bryan Russell 

Jayme Wood 



Letters Policy: Letters must include the 
writer's name in order to be published. 
MainSheet reserves the right to edit to suit 
length and style requirements. We regret 
that we cannot accept poetry. 



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(New England Collegiate 

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at 362-2131 x 323. 



Our minds need not be limited to the contents of a textbook 



by Nancy Brennan 

Bob Dylan wrote the lines, "Yoiu- hatred is rooted in your 
fear. Your paranoia and insecurity, well they don't belong 
here." The "Here," Dylan is referring to, applies to this 
college campus—a place where the purpose of our presence 
is education. We come here to expand our knowledge 
beyond the confines of what we were taught in our homes, 
our high schools, and our churches. We come here so that we 
might abolish the fears we have learned from ignorance and 
intolerance, from prejudice and pride. Our minds need not 
be limited to the contents of a textbook, the opinions of our 
parents, the syllabi of our professors, or the attitudes of our 
peers. 

Diversity is a word which has received a good deal of 
attention and consideration nationwide. We are all being 
asked to question how we deal with those people who are 
different than us~in race, cidture, physical ability, and 
sexual orientation. But why? Why do we need to reconsider 
our attitudes toward others? What good does it do us to 
change our thoughts and behaviors? 

Increased knowledge, awareness and understanding en- 
ablesus to be better human beings. I lookbackonmyanglo- 
saxon-Christian heritage with sadness when I consider the 



millions who have died at the hands of my ancestors. Hatred, 
rooted in fear, stemming from lackof understanding has led, 
and is still leading to the destruction of innocent people. 
However, I, WE, don't have to carry on the tradition of fear, 
hatred, ignorance. We can look back on the past and gain 



Increased knowledge, 
awareness, and under- 
standing enables us to be 
better human beings 



valuable lessons from the mistakes made by our ancestors. 

Look at the Salem witch trials. Innocent people were put 
to death, with no consideration of innocence. Would we 
willingly take part in such a miscarriage of justice today? 

Look at the McCarthy hearings of the 1940s and '50s. 
Howmany people were destroyed because of fear, ignorance 
and injustice? Would we willingly back Joe McCarthy if he 



were alive today? 

And more recently, look at the deaths of thousands of 
Americans which resulted from the ignorance of an admin- 
istration which refused to take the AIDS virus seriously, 
because it "only effected gays and IV drug users." We DID ' 
let this go on because we DID NOT imderstand. 

Look at the children being murdered in the sfreets of 
Boston daily. Do we get angry? Do we look for ways to help 
end the wars within the irmer city? Or do we ignore the 
situation because "They're different. They're not like us." 

The more I consider the hafred and discrimination per-' 
petuated by ignorance, the more I feel the shame of not } 
knowing enough. If ever we are to be a society which caress 
for its members, we need to understand, to accept, and tojj 
learn as much as we can about those who are different from] 
us. We need to destroy the fear that rules our lives, and rules.; 
the decisions made by those who represent us. The only way ' 
we can understand, is if we swallow the fear and start finding 
out why the fear exists. You won't find the answers in yout?' 
textbooks~but you may find them in the person standing nexti;' 
to you. -! 



Are the teenage mutant ninja turtles really so bad? 



by Sheila Johnson 

Ah Saturday! I can finally relax for a couple hoiffs. I pop 
on the tube, and cartoons appear everywhere. They are to me 
relaxing, a change of pace, silly and so unreal. Sorne 
qualities I find extremely valuable when I need a break from 
the regular life, the stressful hfe. 

So I begin to watch. Smurfs? No, too mindless. I like the 
shows with the people cartoons (like the Real Ghost Busters) 
none of that talking bear crap. So I pick my show, sit back 
and relax. Unfortunately my people cartoons get a little 
violent, they slap each other around, run over their pet with 
the truck and other minor injuries occur. The violence, it is 
always a problem. 

By ten a.m. the line-up starts to dwindle, stupid cartoons 



and bowling! Not much fun, so I take that handy remote (yes, 
no men are in the room) and I flip. I carefixlly look for more 
toonsandstopwhenlseethem. Oh, what is this? Superbook? 

Have you ever seen Superbook? If not you must treat 
yourself. Superbook is just anothername for the one and only 
Bible (do I capitalize that?) Religious cartoons truly 

amaze me. There are good little froUs telling you Satan is 
bad. Children are sent back in time by a talking bible to help 
Moses part the Red Sea, and stop the Israelites from stoning 
him to death, and at the end they want Moses to do an 
interview for their grade school newspaper! 

I think we are talking BRAINWASH? On the TBN (The 
Bible Network?) there isagroupofkids(6-14 year old) that 



come on during commercial time, to entertain (no aci 
commercials here). They sing a cute little song that goei 
something like this... We are Christ catchers. Sat; 
stompers...blah blah blah. Why the hell should any child 
singing about stomping Satan? Like he even exists. It ii 
unbelievable what these cartoons are teaching children, they' 
are undoubtly trying to brainwash them into believing that 
with out the love of God you're doomed, your a siimer. 
Prepare for Hell. 

Let's not brainwash our kids, they have enough problems 
as it is. Why don't we teach them more useful thiiigs like to 
beware of priests who pull their pants down! 



I 



Campus Life 



Mainsheet October 7, 1993 page 5 



Focus Survey: 

Do you find parking at CCCC a challenge? 





'^ 




Justin Giles 
Liberal Arts 

"No, I don't really look that 
hard, I just go to the last park- 
ing lot." 



Cathy Lambert 

CNA program 

"Yes! I just keep riding 

around." 



Paul Boucher 
Liberal Arts 

"No, parking on Nantucket 
Island on the 4th of July is 
more challening then park- 
ing at school". 



Donald Flag 
Liberal Arts 

"Idon'tdrive. Therefore it's no 
challenge to me whatsoever." 



Maria Nickerson 
Communications 

"Incrediblyso, it seems to me that 
f)eop!e don't understand what it is 
to park between the lines." 

pMn by Btym Kiistell 



Faculty Commentary: "Education oughtto be 
a journey shared with others" 

A few nights ago, I engaged in an activity as dear to the 
heart of any English teacher as root canal or leg amputation: 
grading papers! Don't get me wrong— it isn't as though I'm 
not interested in what my students have to say in vsriting; it's 
just that after thirtysomething years of making similar com- 
ments on what must now be millions of essays, the thrill has 
waned a bit. 

Anyway, as I was making suggestions in my usual gentle 
manner like "Fix those apostrophe errors, or I'll cut your 
finger off at the knuckle," or "This is a great insight-next 
time write it in English," the TVblared on in the backgro\ind. 
I picked up the remote control and made a quick tour of the 
channels. In seconds, megabytes of news, sitcoms, cop 
shows, MTV, America's funniest serial killers, scientists 
prolonging the life of mummies, and the four hundredth 
rerun of "It's a Wonderful Life" flashed across the screen. 

Suddenly, somewhat between a comma splice and "Home 
Shopping for Ant Farms," a thought took shape. REMOTE 
CONTROL! I said it aloud: "REMOTE CONTROL!" I 
went to the dictionary, "...control of the operation or 
performance of an apparatus from a distance." 

Surrounded by student papers and the universe of tele- 
vised reality, I began to wonder. In our mad dash to make 
college more accessible, to acquire and utilize increased 
amounts of technology, are we turning the teaching-learning 
experience into an "operation or performance of an apparatus 
from a distance"? 

It's terrific to have classes scheduled early in the morning 



and late at night to accommodate folks who have to work 
and/or parent; to have televised courses and "college by 
cassette" for those who cannot drive or who live far from 
campus; to be part of a national computer network from 
which students and staff can communicate with people and 
ideas all across the nation. 

It's terrific IF in the process we don't lose sight that 
fragile, special, irreplaceable something called human in- 
teraction and turn our selves into apparatuses (small, three- 
toed, orange creatures who spend their brief lives writing 
essay exams). 

It's terrific IF in the process we don't lose every oppor- 
timity to spend an hour talking to someone, having a cup of 
coffee or a sandwich, being part of a club or service activity, 
learning and laughing OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM. 

It's terrific IF in the process we don't lose. ..the PRO- 
CESS. Education is supposed to bring about change, "to 
lead us forth" to something better than what we had before 
we got educated. It shouldn't be "an operation or perfor- 
mance of an apparatus at a distance." Rather it ought to be 
a journey, shared vidth others, close up and personal. 

At CCCC, we have a wonderful opportunity to combine 
access, technology, AND real people into a matrix of 
genuine community. But don't take my word for it-try it for 
yourself It's more than a remote possibility that you'll find 
it an exciting alternative. 

Oh, if you're interested in pursuing this idea fiuther, look 
for me in the Arts Center. I'll be the one grading papers. 



Professor Louise A. DeSantis Deutsch has been teaching English here since 1978. 



Student Profile: Michael Abdow 




■^ What do you like least about CCCC7There is very little 
campus life, unlike a real college. The commute sucks. 



Who has been your most influential professor? 

McKey, she's my spiritual guru. 



P.J. 



Name: Michael Abdow 

Age: 18 

Hometown: Orleans 

Course of Study: Theatre arts/Communication 



What books and movies would you recommend? My 

favorite book is How to Talk Dirty and Influence People by 
Lenny Bruce. My favorite movie is Clockwork Orange by 
Stanley Kubrick, 

What's your pet peeve? Lack of people my age here and 
people bringing kids into class. 

How do you spend your free time? Doing theatre withmy 
lovely girlfriend Jen. 

What message would you send to the President? You 

said you'd give us change; that's aU I have in my pocket. 



What do you like best about CCCC? Getting cheap What message would you send to beings from another 

college credits. galaxy? Get away! This world is run by assholes and mad 

men! 



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page 6 MainSheet October 7, 1993 



Entertainment 




I Ford has nine lives in The Fugitive 



by Laurel Bloom 

In order to enjoy the 
recently released movie, The 
Fugitive, you must unequivo- 
cally suspend your disbelief, 
truly adopt the concept of 
cats having nine lives and 
believe that George Bush 
could possibly be re-elected 
in 1996. Allofthisiseasyto 
do as the fast-paced action of this suspense-thriller 
takes you on a roUercoaster ride that will have you vacillating 
between the edge of your seat and biting not only your 
fingernails, but those of everyone around you. 

The Fugitive— based on the old television series—is 
a story about a prominent vascular surgeon, Richard Kimble 
(played by Harrison Ford), who is wrongly accused of 
brutally murdering his wife. Not only is he convicted, but he 
is also given the death penalty. But, this being the movies, 
a funny thing happened on the way to the prison—and without 
giving the details of one of the best action/crash scenes in 
recent movie memory— Dr. Kimble escapes and becomes a 
fugitive, on the run. 

To call what ensues just a manhunt, would be like 
callingMichael Jordanjust another basketball player. Chased 
by Deputy U. S. Marshal Sam Gerard (played by Tommy Lee 



Jones) and his team of bloodhounds, the search takes us on 
an exciting thrill ride. The action sends us over dams and 
waterfalls, through tunnels and sewer piping, on a ride of the 
public transit system in Chicago and to ahospital in the good 
doctor's own backyard. 




However emest the law may be, they are always so 
close and yet so far. Almost captured many times. Dr. 
Kimble manages to stay one step ahead of them throughout 
the movie. These are the times when our suspension of 
disbelief is being stretched to new heights. 

In one scene, when Marshal Gerard has Dr. Kimble 
trapped at the end of a dam pipe that empties out to a few 
hundred foot drop over a waterfall, Dr. Kimble pleads that he 
didn't kill his wife. Marshal Gerards' response is an em- 
phatic, "I don't care!" We now know that Marshal Gerard is 
a blade runner of the first degree and will stop at nothing to 



bring Dr. Kimble in. 

Dr. Kimble, having no other choice-remember he 
was given the death penalty— proceeds to dive head first over 
the waterfall to what should have been his instant death. 
Never fear however, the cat still has five lives left. If Dr. 
Kimble died every time he should have in this movie, the 
movie would have been over in the first half hour. 

Despite the few minor plot inconsistencies and a 
few technical faux pas'. The Fugitive is what I consider to be 
good entertainment. Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee Jones 
both deliver strong performances. 

It's fairly evident from the beginning of the movie 
that Dr. Kimble did not kill his wife. It just doesn't seem 
likely. Consequently, the cheering for the good guy is what 
drives the movie forward along with the nonstop action and 
superbstunts. Wewanthimtoescapeandempathizewithhis 
fear and disillusionment. It makes us shudder to think that an 
iimocent man could be wrongly convicted and given the 
death penalty . After all , we wonder, could this happen to me? 
A contrived ending that seems like something 
you've seen somewhere before, is not however, a let down. 
In true Hollywood fashion, good wins out over evil and we 
have the happy ending. Even Marshal Gerard turns out to be 
an O.K. guy. If suspense, fear and thrills are your idea of a 
fun time, do not miss this exciting adventure ride. 




The Wolf Man Returns ^^7^^^ 



by Jack Higgins 

After ten years of conspicuous absence on the music 
scene, Peter Wolf (ex lead singer with the J.Geils band) has 
returned in top form. 

Now working on his fourth disc since the demise of The 
J.Geils Band, Wolf has finally taken his music back to the 
stage. His band, The House Party Five, includes, Johnny "A" 
on guitars, Brian Maes on keyboards, Tim Archibald on bass, 
David Stephanelli on drums (he has worked on all of Wolf s 
solo projects), and of course the "Wolfhian" on vocals. 
Maes, Archibald, and Stephanelli are also fiiU time members 
of RTZ, the band which was formed out of the remnants of 
Boston. 

Wolf hadn't played live in years until Bruce Springstein 
coaxed him on stage at the Boston Garden last January, to 
sing "Mustang Sally" and "In the Midnight Hour" with Bruce 
for the encores. 

Wolf had intended to tour earlier in his solo career, but 



with little or no record company support, the effort was futile . 

Over the summer Wolf played a slew of club gigs to see 
if the interest was still out there for a sweaty, down and dirty, 
revved up, R&B party band. The answer seems to have been 
a big "YES", because at show time there were no tickets to 
be had at any of the shows, and more and more dates were 
added. 

The live show is very reminiscent of late 70's J.Geils 
shows, a virtual marathon that averages just under 3 hours. 
(Wolf must do 5 miles just pacing the st^e.) The material 
played during the shows sticks mostly to Wolf s writing both 
with the J. Geils band and his solo work, but does include a 
few old R&B classics. 

Peter Wolf and The House Party Five are a tight, well 
oiled, fine timed machine . Look for them at the WBCN bash 
at The Boston Garden later this fall. Their new disc will be 
released by early spring. 



fom Of jtdi Hligba 



CD Review: Muddy ■ 
Water Blues 



British vocalist praises iiis roots 




by Jack Higgins 

With all the hoopla surrounding the resiurection of blues 
music as the foimdation for most of the popular music today, 
someone finally added the footing to that foundation. That 
someone is Paul Rodgers (ex. Free, Bad company, The 
Firm), along with a crack outfit that includes Jason Bonham 
(his father was the late drummer of Led Zepplin) on drums, 
bassist Pino Palidino, and Ian Hatton rhythm guitar and a 
barrage of guest lead guitar players. 

This tribute to the blues legend Muddy Waters (Mckinley 
Morganfield) shines throughout, although it seems slightly 
ironic that most of the players here are British, you still get 
the "Chicago" and "Delta" style blues feel. 

The songs contained on this disc were not all written by 
Muddy, but they were all part of his recording and live 
repertoire. Tlie songs which he did not write were those of 
his contempories Willy Dixon, Sonny Boy Williamson and 
Booker T. Jones, there is even a standout tribute written by 
Paul Rodgers called "Muddy Water Blues" (both an acoustic 
and electric version appear here). 

With the vast array of guest lead guitar players one might 
think the atmosphere would be crowded with their own 
signature tone and riffs, however this is not the case. This 
points to the fact that these guitar players cut their teeth on 
the music of the Chicago bluesmen before defining their on 
style. As a matter of fact these guitar players create a unique 
hybrid sounding blues, blending just enough of their own 



pMt if Biym Russell 

sound with the tried and true licks of the "blues." 

Some of the tracks that stand out here the most are 
"Louisiana Blues" and "She's Alright," both played by 
Trevor Rabin (ex. Yes) who is probably the least known of all 
the guitarists who appear on the disc. 

Jeff Beck, the British guitar legend, also lends his guitar 
wizardry to several tracks, "Rolling Stone" (The Rolling 
Stones took their name ft'om this song), "Good Morning 
Little School Girl," and "I Just Want To Make Love To You." 

Other players on this tribute include, Brian Setzer (Stray 
Cats), Steve Miller, David Gihnour (Pink Floyd), Slash 
(Guns & Roses), Gary Moore (Thin Lizzy), Neal Schon 
(Journey, Bad English), Ritchie Sambora (Bon Jovi) and 
Brian May (Queen). 

There are also guest appearances by Paul Shaffer on 
Hammond Organ, and by harmonica virtuoso Jimmy Wood. 

As tight and full a "Blues" project this is, it is hard to get 
out of your head that the signature voice that reins throughout 
is that of ex. Bad Company lead vocalist Paul Rodgers. Some 
of the songs sound as if Bad Co. went to Chicago to do a disc 
of "Blues" standards. 

All in all this disc is a great tribute to one of the great 
"Blues" legends of recent times, (Muddy Waters died in 
1984) and just might possibly introduce his music to a new 
generation of listeners. 



Boston Fun 



Hayden Planetarium at The Museum of Science 

Laser Shows 

Pink Floyd:Daik Side of the Moon," Thurs.-Sun. at 9:15 
p.m. 

Lollapalaser," Fri.-Sat. at 8 and 10:30 p.m. 

Led Zeppelin in the Evening" Thurs. and Sun. at 8 p.m. 

At Avalon 

Belly and Radiohead Fri. Oct.8th 6:30 p.m. show 

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones Sat. Oct.9th 7:00 p.m. show 

The Samples Thurs. Oct. 14th 7:00 p.m. show 

Black 47 Fri. Oct.lSth 7:00 p.m. show 

At The Paradise 

The Radiators Thurs.-Fri. Oct.7th & 8th 8:00 p.m. show 
Bob Mould (acoustic) Tues-Wed. Oct. 12th & 13th 



Bass Player for Mighty 
Mighty Bosstones Stabbed 

Bass player Joel Gittleman, of Boston's own 
Mighty Miglity Bosstones, and aroadmerchandiser for 
the band were stabbed on September 22, while on totur 
in Italy with two other bands, Fishbone and The Stone 
Temple Pilots. They were reportedly confronting a 
man peddling bootleg band merchandise when the 
knifing occurted. Gittleman narrowly avoided apunc- 
tured lung. Both are said to be recuperating. No word 
yet on whether the Bosstones will continue the tour. 



Features 



Mainsheet October 7, 1993 page 7 



^ A new look at intimate relationships and addiction 

Professor writes book that 'gets to the heart of the essentials of healthy relating' 



by Tom Redmond 

Faculty member and Cape Cod Times columnist Tom 
O'Comiell has authored a new book on relationships. En- 
titled Improving Intimacy: 1 Powerful Strategies, the book 
is what he describes as "a small book on a very large subject." 
Mr. O'Comiell, who writes a weekly column on addiction, 
feels that "the most harmful barrier to healthy relating is 



'The most harmful bar- 
rier to healthy relating 
is addiction' 



addiction." He came to writing this book through an increas- 
ing awareness that an addiction is a relationship. The aim of 
this work, Mr. O'Cotmell said, is "to get right to the heart 
about the essentials of healthy relating." 

He begins the book with a close look at the various ways 
addictions impair relationships, and outlines the process of 
infatuation and addictive relating. Then he explores the 
elements of healthy relating; the three basic relationships( to 
self, others, and to God ), sex and wholeness, the various 
kinds of love, the need for self-knowledge and self-disci- 
pline, and the important distinctions between real love and 
the illusion of "love." 

Stressing the need for a spiritual basis for loving, Mr. 
O'Comiell proposes ten powerful strategies for improving 



intimacy. Tlie strategies, which include such subjects as 
listening, communication, and resolving conflict, are practi- 
cal and inspirational. 

Mr. O'Cormell has an extensive background as a writer. 




Professor Tom O'Comiell 

educator and lecturer on addictions. Aside from his weekly 
column, he has published nimierous articles and books, as 
well as hosting a weekly public affairs show on local 
television. He came to his awareness of alcohol and drug 



abuse while serving on the Governor's Highway Safety 
Committee and later as the Executive Director of the Massa- 
chusetts Safety Council. He is currently affiliated with many 
alcohol and drug related foundations and coimcils as a 
consultant. 

Mr. O'Connell said he initially thought of addiction as a 
health problem and adisease. However, his years of thinking 
about the subject and being challenged by it brought him to 
the conclusion that addiction is a primary relationship. 
"Therefore relationships can be addicting ," he said, "and 
because addiction flows through human nature most people 



'Because addiction 
flows through human 
nature most people do 
become addicted to an- 
other human being.' 



do become addicted to another human being." These addic- 
tive tendencies impair all of our relationships, he said. 

"Because creating healthy relationships or connecting is 
the essence of life itself," Mr. O'Connell said, " it reqtiires 
our best efforts." He emphasized that intimate relating is an 
art form. "We do not create works of art by just dabbling," 
he said, "We have to practice our art on a consistent basis." 



Thomas Edwards: Student Senate president with an attitude 



by Nancy Brennan 

Thomas Edwards is the new Student Senate president, 
and he's pushing to see some serious changes take place on 
campus. Elected to the presidency in the spring, Mr. Edwards 
is enthusiastic and demanding in his new position of leader- 
ship. 

"We need student body involvement," says Mr. Edwards 
from his desk in the Student Senate office. "We need student 
representation on the college committees, and we need 
student support." 

Students have a good deal of power in the decision 
making processes on campus. The student body is entitled to 
hold voting positions on all of the college standing commit- 
tees, which present recommendations to the main governing 
body of the college, the All College Meeting. At the All 
College Meeting, decisions are made regarding academic 
policy, tuition, fees, curriculum, and all other aspects which 
directly affect students. But Mr. Edwards says that students 
have not taken an active role in the meetings, and as a result, 
many decisions have been made that may not be in the best 
interest of the student body. 

In regards to making changes on campus, Mr. Edwards 
says that it is"easyformembersof the college familyto make 



changes hard to accomplish." 

"Time works against us," he explains. "By the time 
students get things going, it's time to graduate and move on. 
Time works for people who oppose us." 

As far as the Student Senate is concerned, Mr. Edwards 
would like to see it "given the consideration and respect it 
deserves." But he acknowledges that "as representatives of 
the student government, we need to earn that consideration 
and respect." 

When asked what his major concern is on campus, Mr. 
Edwards replies, "Funding is cut to a point where morale is 
at an all-time low. I'm concerned with the new education 
reform laws and how they will affect this college." 

As far as the attitudes of the faculty and administration, 
Mr. Edwards says that he has received a great deal of support, 
but notes that there is "too much finger-pointing going on." 

"No one wants to accept responsibility for decisions," 
Mr. Edwards says. "There are too many circuitous explana- 
tions." 

As for Thomas Edwards on a personal level, he is at age 
37, a non-traditional student, a fourth semester computer 
science major, and a dad. He also asked that it be mentioned 




pkatos bi Brtui Kussell 



Thomas Edwards 



that he is not a Native American-which his long braid and 
dark complexion have caused many to beUeve. "I'm Cape 
Verdean," he laughs when questioned on his nationality. 
"Most people think I'm an American Indian." 



Katie^s Cooking Corner 



Mom's Taco Salad Serves 12 

1 pound ground beef 

1 package of Taco Seasoning 

1 large head of lettuce, shredded 

2 tomatoes, chopped 

1/2 green pepper, chopped 

1/2 red pepper, chopped 

1/4 red onion, chopped 

1 can black olives, sliced 

2-3 cups crushed Cool Ranch Doritos 




2 cups grated mild Cheddar cheese 
8 oz. bottle of Catalina 
Tabasco sauce to taste 

Brown ground beef, drain well and rinse with warm water. 
Cook as directed on taco seasoning package. Chill. While 
beef is chilling prepare vegetables and place in a large bowl. 
Just before servingaddgroundbeef, cheese, Catalina, Doritos 
and tabasco. Toss well. 

Vegetables can be added or deleted to taste. Enjoy! 




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E S L E y 



The Graduate School 



page 8 MainSheet October 7, 1993 



Depression: A complex issue 



Women's Page 



for women 



by Dr. Helen GolHshian 

Recently, I was asked to write an article on depression for 
the Women's Page of the Mainsheet. I concluded that I was 
asked because 1 teach the Psychology of Women class and 
am the faculty advisor to the Women in Transition program, 
two activities that should make me somewhat knowledge- 
able about women and behavior. 

Before 1 discuss the topic, however, I should like to 
cotnment on the other knowledgeable people at CCCC and 
how they also contribute to our understanding of female 
behavior including women and depression. Most specifi- 
cally, I am referring to those professors, both women and 
men who teach courses in Human Sexuality, Women in 
Literature, Women in History and especially those faculty 
who have made a special effort to include women's issues in 
the discourse of teaching their subject matter. It is the 
teaching across the curriculum of women's issues that truly 
sheds light on complex issues such as women and depression. 
Administrators and staff also contribute as they maintain 
egalitarian policies and serve on committees to combat 
sexism on campus; and last but not least;, the students who 
seek to know the causes and remedies to the painfiil realities 
of sexism and discrimination. 

The following information regarding women and depres- 
sion comes from the 1987 American Psychological 
Association's National Task Force on Women and Depres- 
sion. The purpose of the task force was to identify the risk 
factors and treatment needs of women with depression in 
recognition of the fact that depression is one of the most 
serious mental health problems of the eighties and nineties. 
Although women are not the only ones to suffer from 
depression, the report's summarization of existing research 
indicates that women's risk of depression exceeds that of 
men by two to one. It is estimated that there are currently 
seven million women in the United States with diagnosable 
depression but that most will go untreated even though new 
treatments can reduce the symptoms for 80-90% of patients 
in 12-14 weeks. 



The APA report is divided into three sections. The first 
section identifies at least six areas that could possibly 
contribute to women's higher risk to depression. These 
include a number of social, economic, biological and emo- 
tional factors. Therefore a biopsychosocial perspective is 
needed to understand the dynamics of women and depres- 
sion. 

One factor pertains to cognitive and personality styles. 
Specifically these include avoidant, passive, dependent be- 
havior patterns; pessimistic, negative thinking styles, and 
focusing on the depression rather that action and mastery 
strategies. 

Another factor is the high rate of sexual and physical abuse 
of women. Consequently, the depressive symptoms may be 
the effects of posttraumatic stress syndrome. Marriage 
appears to be a greater advantage to men than women since 
women are three times as likely as men to be depressed than 
married men and single women. Mothers of young children 
are highly vulnerable to depression; the more children in the 
house, the more depression is reported especially if the 
mother is not employed outside the home. 

The report also found that poverty is the "pathway to 
depression." Seventy-five percent of the U.S. poverty popu- 
lation (annual income of $5, 776 or less) are women and 
children. Minority women, elderly women, chemically 
dependent women, lesbians, and professional women are 
also considered high risk groups for depression. 

The task force emphasized the need to distinguish be- 
tween an isolated symptom of depression and a persistent set 
of symptoms, or syndrome. Therefore, a carefiil diagnosis is 
critical in the treatment of depression. Diagnostic assess- 
ment for women, in particular, should include taking a 
history of sexual and physical violence, an exploration of 
prescription drug utilization, past and current medical con- 
ditions, and a reproductive life history to see how menstrua- 
tion, birth control, pregnancy, childbirth, abortion, andmeno- 
pause may have contributed to the women's depression. 




^ti>tos tf Biym Kossell 



work differently for women than for men. Depression in 
women is misdiagnosed at least 30-50% of the time and 
approximately 70% of the prescriptions for antidepressants 
are given to women, often with improper diagnosis and 
monitoring. Consequently, prescription drug misuse is a 
very real danger for women. 

Anti-depressants and the structured therapies have about 
the same success rate for depressed women with less severe 
depressive disorders. Approximately 67% of women, how- 
ever, who take anti-depressants stop taking them after a 
period of time. These are considered drop-outs. There is a 
very real danger that antidepressants may encourage depen- 
dency, passivity, and a victim psychology in women, which 
could reinforce depression over time. 

Continue on to page 11 



Refusing the "Perfect Body" image 



by Michele A uclair 

I have gone and done it. After all my protests and denials, 
I've done it. I have bought the image that the cosmetics and 
fashion world has spent so much money on in advertising. 
I've bought their idea of "The Perfect Body." 

It was a temporary lapse of judgement, but it did happen, 
and I am disappointed in myself for letting it happen. I let it 
happen even though I know these companies dress sixteen 
yearold girls to look like beautiful, thin, twenty-five year old 
women. I also know that true beauty does come from within; 
a pretty face does not equal a happy soul. 

What can I say? I had a tough couple of days of feeling fat 
andfiumpy. lam a thin, healthy person! There was no reason 
for my dissatisfaction. I've got pockets of cellulite that will 
never go away, but so what? I'll never make the Sports 
Illustrated swimsuit issue, but who cares, right?! 

Half of my brain knows this isn't important, but the other 
half wants perfection: perfection as demonstrated on the 
Cosmopolitan and Playboy covers, the thin smooth legs, fiill 
butt, perky breasts, and a flat tunrniy. 

I can certainly understand, now, how women come to 
suffer from eating disorders, such as bulimia and anorexia 
nervosa. Pressure from society on a woman's self image is 
not a purely modem condition. Joan Jacobs Brumberg 
explains in her book, Fasting Girls: The Emergence of 
Anorexia Nervosa as a Modem Disease (Harvard University 
Press), that the problem has a long history. She says that the 
first clinical descriptions of the disorder appeared in 1873, 
and that a best-selling weight confrol book by Lulu Hart 
Peters was testimony, in 1 9 1 8, to the fact that "fat was out of 
fashion." 

Using food shortanes resulting from Worid War I as an 
incentive, Peters declared that many Americans were guilty 
of hoarding food in their own fat bodies. As Brumberg 
pointed out, Peters' instruction and advice implied that "to be 
a fat woman constituted a failure of personal morality." 

As though being told you were not a good person or 
American if you were heavy wasn't bad enough, the intro- 
duction of ready-to-wear clothing added pressure. In order 
to market this clothing, the fashion industry introduced 
standard sizing. This increased emphasis on personal body 
size and gave legitimacy to the idea of a normative size 
range. Women had to pay more to have ready-made clothes 
altered; men did not. Frustration and embarrassment from 



figure flaws caused new anxiety in girls and women that 
could not fit into the fashionable clothing because of their 
weight. 

The advancement of photography and fashion advertising 
made the situation worse . Models became thinner to accom- 
modate the distortions of the camera and the clothing de- 
signed for slim figures. 

Brumberg tells us that in 1918 Vogue magazine said, 
"There is one crime against the modem ethics of beauty 
which is unpardonable far better it is to commit any number 
of petty crimes that to be guilty of the sin of growing fat." 

What about the sin of encouraging a unhealthy emphasis on 
body shape? Anorexia and bulimia can lead to serious 



physical damage, and death from kidney failure and cardiac 
arrest. 

Obviously it isn't just the magazines, fashion and beauty- 
aid companies that are at fault for this problem, it is society 
as a whole. Common characteristics of victims of eating 
disorders include perfectionism and agreat need for ^proval 
from family and society. They feel a need for control over 
everything they do, and they believe becoming overweight 
is the worst thing that can happen to them. 

Where is this pressure to be perfect and in confrol coming 
from? We need to question the values we hold, as femilies 
and as members of society. 



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Focus 



Mainsheet October 7, 1993 page 9 



Educate children about violence...don't shoot! 



by Michele Queenan 

According to America magazine, the daily amount of 
television watched in the 1960's was approximately six 
hours. Most everyone knew they could not be the Rifleman, 
or jujnp off buildings in a Superman costume. In the 1990's 
the amount of television watched on a daily basis has 
approximately doubled and in some cases tripled. Now more 
children are imitating their favorite television or movie 
personalities. 

National Public Radio recently aired an interview with a 
teen-age gang member who, without a shred of remorse, said 
he would kill without a second thought. He and his friends 
hadseen "Terminator" and for months afterward were pumped 
up, wanting to be just like that movie's futuristic star. This 
boy also told the interviewer that getting an uzi is no 
problem. 

According to a 1993 National Education Association 
report, 100,000 kids carry guns to school on a daily basis. 
Some 1 60,000 kids fear being physically harmed, and 40 kids 
aday are injured or murdered. These things occurs all across 



America, not just in the inner city, or in poor neighborhoods. 

Leon Eron Ph.D., the chairperson for the American Psy- 
chological Association'sCommission on Violence and Youth, 
wrote in a recent Psychology Today article, that research 
shows that violent behavior in children is related to watching 
violence on television. Research subjects who had 
watched more violent programs were more frequently con- 
victed of serious crimes and had more overly aggressive 
behavior. 

Children are learning that weapons equate fear, and that 
carrying one gives one a sense of power and respect. 

The Montel Williams show recently depicted a six year 
old boy who stole his mother's gun (which she carried for 
protection) because he was being harassed by two older boys. 
Everyday at school the older boys would steal his lunch 
money, or whatever else they wanted from him. Once the 
youth brought the gun to school and was caught with it. The 
entire school learned what he had done, and now the older 
boys leave him alone. A frightening message is being sent 



to America's children. 

The Children's Television Workshop(CTW) has said 
that the violence on television must be regulated by an 
adult. Without proper education and viewing restraints 
the violent acts being portrayed could be interpreted 
wrongly, says the CTW. 

USA Today Weekend Edition recently conducted a 
survey and found that 65,000 children are afraid to 
attend school on a daily basis. The main reason is they 
do not feel safe. They are afraid to go to the bathroom 
in school, and many of their peers carry weapons to 
school. Violence across the country is out of control. 

Many persons feel that the increased violence among 
children is due to overexposure to violence depicted by 
television and other media. Some feel that it is the 
parent's responsibility to control what their children are 
viewing, while others feel it is the media that should 
censor themselves. 



Focus Survey: 



photos bf Bryan Russell 



Is the media influencing children to commit violent acts? 



1 




Tamara Fitzpatrick 
Liberal Arts 

"Yes, many negative conno- 
tations are given off It's the 
parents' duty to observe what 
is being watched." 



Brett Noucher 
Liberal Arts 

"No, positive can come out 
of TV. Especially commer- 
cials like recycling and pub- 
lic service announcements." 



Kathy Doherty 

Early Childhood Education 

"Yes, TV shows promote too 
much violence." 



Laurie Blanchard 
Libral Arts 

"No, if more parental guid- 
ance were instituted there 
would not be as many prob- 
lems." 



Brian Morisson 
Criminal Justice 

"Yes, to a point, but the me- 
dia can not be solely respon- 
sible. Children are influenced 
by other soiu-ces as well." 



Media violence corrupts tlie 
child's mind 



by Cynthia Steinmueller 

Does TV make children commit violent acts? This is a question many parents are asking 
themselves these days. 

Yes, as a parent I believe the violence children see on television alters the way they act 
out aggression and frusfration, and indeed cause some children to behave violently. 

According to sociological research found in "Social Problems", co-authored by Frank R. 
Scarpitti and Margaret L. Andersen, aggressive behavior is socially learned in the same 
maimer as are more benign patterns of behavior. 

According to Scarpitti and Andersen, during the course of socialization, children are 
equally capable of learning constructive or destructive responses to situations that confront 
them. The values to which children are exposed to within the family, the role models 
available to them, and the social sanctions associated with various patterns of behavior 
influence the character of the behavior patterns a child learns. A substantial amount of data 
now indicates that television viewing has become an important component in the socializa- 
tion experiences of American children. 

Many sociologists believe that television depicts violence so often and in such a manner 
as to create the impression that it is an accepted part of our life style. Research indicates that 
prime time television depicts five violent acts per hour and that the average child viewer will 
witness some 30,000 violentacts, including 8000 murders, by the end of elementary school. 

It is important to understand that children don't necessarily imitate the behavior they see 
but this behavior may instigate an increase in general aggressiveness following exposure to 
viewed violence. 

After watching violent behavior, children may be more likely to engage in a wide variety 
of aggressive acts, some of which will be quite different from the specific act they observed. 
" Children who are easily fr^sfrated learn from the media that aggression is a quick and easy 
way of dealing with problems. 

Why is it so easy for parents to believe that our children can learn their ABC's from 
Sesame Stteet, but why can't we make the connection between the movie "Colors,"glorifying 
gang life, and increased gang violence? Some theater management considered not showing 
this movie because of the fighting that took place outside the theaters after the show. 

We know kids look up to famous actors and sports figures. Tliey want to look like, talk 
like, and play sports like these public heros. People allow their children to follow fads and 
clothing styles shown on TV. But these same people refiise to recognize violence on TV 
a having an adverse affect on our children. 

For this mother there is more than enough evidence to suggest that what is depicted on 
TV has a definite affect on the behavior of our children whether it is violent or not. It is my 



belief that children are being desensitized to violence and choose violent acts as a way of 
dealing with frustration and disappointment. 

Children are impressionable. I remember trying to convince my four year old daughter 
that rabbits do not cluck or lay Cadbury Creme eggs at Easter time. When my son watches 
Brett the "Hitman" Hart bodyslam Yoko Zima, he reaches out to put one of his sisters in a 
figure four lock. That's all the proof I need. 

Media reflects society's 
meitdowii 

by Tom Redmond 

Absolutely not! The idea that the media influences children to commit acts of violence 
is a ridiculous inference. First and foremost the media is just reflecting the violence that 
already exists in society. We are not obviously the first society to experience violence. It 
has, unfortunately, been with mankind since the dawn of civilization and always incremen- 
tally increasing in tandem with the degree of deterioration of society. We are, however, the 
first generation to experience the breakdown of society with the barometer of television. 

Are we to blame television for the deterioration of our societies' mores and values? What 
is the impetus of this TV violence? Is it an aberration? Where do the scriptwriters get their 
plots for the movie of the week? From real life, from us, you know... society! 

Did this medium flood society with drugs and guns? Did television invent driveby 
shootings or authorize open season on Florida tourists? Are the Waco incident. Amy Fisher 
or the L.A. riots fictional accounts? Is television responsible for the tide pool of desolate, 
dehumanizing poverty that spawns this desperate violence? Did Cain kill Abel after 
watching Saturday morning cartoons? . 

Listen! Parents control the immediate environment of their kids and provide the primary 
role models. They are the biggest influence regardless of what is on TV. If parents are not 
instilling the proper moral values in their children is TV to blame for this lack of influence? 
Perhaps the parents are too busy working two or three jobs to survive the economic genocide 
fostered by the fiscal policies of the Reagan/Bush era. 

If our families are failing then the institutions that support our families are failing. The 
Judicial, Educational, and Religious institutions have lost their moral values and influence 
because they either don't work or they don't work for everyone. 

I certainly don't feel as though we need violence on TV or that copy cat acts of violence 
don't exist. However violence on television is so pervasive because we relate to it. We 
understand the anger, fear and rage of living in a violent society. We recognize ourselves. 

We must ask ourselves a much larger question, whatare the root causes of the violence 
in society that is depicted on TV? 



paso 10 MainSheet October 7, 1993 



We reserve the right to limit quantities. 
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Health 



Mainsheet October 7, 1993 page 11 



Hepatitis B, the only sexually transmitted disease, 
preventable by vaccination, contracted by 300,000 each year 

National Hepatitis B Prevention Day declared to educate Americans 



by Michele Queenan 

Hepatitis B is the only sexually transmitted disease pre- 
ventable by vaccination, but less than one percent of the 28 
million sexually active young adults and adolescents at risk 
have been vaccinated. 

There are 1 .25 million infectious carriers of hepatitis B in 
the United States today, and many of those infected show no 
signs of the disease and therefore may pass it to others 
unknowingly. 

Each year 300,000 Americans contract hepatitis B, a virus 
1 00 times more contagious than, and as widespread as HIV, 
the virus that causes AIDS. Fourteen people die each day 
from hepatitis B related hver damage and cirrhosis. 

Hepatitis B is contracted through blood and other body 
fluids, yet one-third of those infected have no identifiable 
risk factors. 

July 27,1993 was proclaimed to be National Hepatitis B 
Prevention Day, by Richard J. Duma, M.D., Ph.D., Execu- 
tive Director of the National Foimdation for Infectious 
Diseases (NIFD). Observance of this day was created to 
focus the attention of the public, especially the young people, 
encouraging them to learn about sexually transmitted disease 
and its prevention through vaccination. 

According to the NIFD, The rate of hepatitis B infection 



among heterosexuals has increased 77 percent in the last 
decade, with 75 percent of all cases occurring among young 
adults between the ages of 15 and 39. 

While sexual contact is one method of transmission, the 
source of infection and exposure to blood and other body 
fluids may come from work or close contact with hepatitis B 



"All college students should be vac- 
cinated against hepatitis B." Ameri- 
can College Health Association 



carrier who is a friend or family member. 

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration 
(OSHA) now requires employers to vaccinate all their at-risk 
employees. The standard applies to many high-risk profes- 
sions, including: health care personnel (physicians, nurses, 
dentists, medical students, laboratory technicians), first-line 
responders (police, fire fighters, emergency medical techni- 



cians), any other employees who may be exposed to the 
hepatitis B virus through contact with potential carriers or 
blood and other body fluids at work. 

Since there is no risk factor identified for one-third of 
those infected, even those who don't fall into a high-risk 
category should consider vaccination. 

According to a news release published by the NIFD, 
prevention of hepatitis B is a priority for government orga- 
nizations and health associations. 

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 
urges hepatitis B vaccination for all infants and recommends 
vaccination for adolescents and young adults who have more 
than one sexual partner in a six-month period. In addition the 
American College Health Association (ACHA) announced 
in June 1993 new guidelines urging ALL college students to 
get vaccinated against hepatitis B. 

A toll-free hepatitis B hotline has been set up. By calling 
1-800-HEP-B-873, interested parties can receive free infor- 
mation about hepatitis B, and can also be referred to a local 
physician to discuss hepatitis B prevention. 

With growing support among physicians, and education 
of yotmg adults, the hope is that hepatitis B can be eradicated. 



The legacy of alcoholism: Parenting as an Adult Child of an Alcoholic 



by Susan Morris 

At least 22 million American aduhs were raised by an 
alcoholic parent, and nearly all of them have scars— both 
psychological and physical as a consequence. Coming from 
homes filled with loneliness and terror, children of alcohol- 
ics grow up unable to lead lives free from guilt, deep 



Recognizing parenting as one of 
the most important roles in life, it 
is our responsibility and concern 
to see that our children need to be 
nurtured and valued 



insecurity, lack of self esteem, and intense sadness. 

Some children living in an alcoholic home can be iden- 
tified easily because the alcoholic is in a treatment facility, 
or because the spouse and children talk openly about the 
drinking. Other children are recognized as coming from 
problem homes by their appearance, which could indicate 
physical neglect, poor academic performance, poor social 



skills, or even evident physical abuse. However the majority 
of children of alcoholics are not so easily identifiable. 

Recognizing parenting as one of the most important roles 
in life, it is our responsibility and concern to see that our 
children need to be nurtured and valued; no child ever 
deserves to be beaten, abused, or violated. Children deserve 
our trust. Support for children of alcoholics are being 
developed and conducted by many schools across the nation. 
Some are groups that are peer lead, others are lead by 
community volunteers or people involved in the schools. 
These groups are not called therapy groups but are generally 
called rap groups, drop-in groups and support groups. These 
serve a very important part of chlldrens' lives when they have 
no one else to turn to and remain in the house for circum- 
stances beyond their own control. 

Alcoholism isthegiftthatgoesongiving. Childrenraised 
in alcoholic families who have not worked through their own 
delayed grief and cried their own childhood tears find the 
same patterns in their own family systems, with or without 
the alcohol, what they feared and hated as children. 

The grief process involves experiencing the grief of 
several generations as well as the losses of one's own 
childhood. Makingthe choice to enterthe process of walking 



back through the trauma is choosing not to be a victim any 
longer. You can choose to break the cycle. 

With enough insight, determination, and change you can 
regain your lost childhood. It takes a great deal of willing- 
ness and commitment to build the necessary skills to reclaim 
your childhood. Light-heattedness, trust, openness, and the 
ability to expect wonderfril surprises can be learned and 
practiced. The chance does come back. Adult children of 
alcoholics can learn to expect the good in each day, learn to 



The grief process involves experi- 
encing the grief of several genera- 
tions as well as the losses of one's 
own childhood. 



build sand castles, wonder about mysterious possibilities and 
relie their childhood in a safe way and know that there's 
life after alcoholism. 



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Continued from page 8 

How do you know if you or someone you know is 
depressed? The symptoms of depression include (1) emo- 
tional aspects such as a dejected mood, or apathy; (2) 
cognitive aspects including low self-esteem and negative 
expectations about the fiiture; (3) motivational aspects, that 
is motivation is low and there is an inability to mobilize 
oneself to action; and (4) behavioral aspects-appetite loss, 
sleep disturbance, loss of interest of in sex, and tiredness. 
Everyone feels one or all of these symptoms at some time in 
their lives, however, if one, some or all of the symptoms 
persist, it would probably be wise to investigate the reasons. 
Remember, there is no one expert. You are the best judge of 
what helps the most in alleviating or eliminating the symp- 
toms. 



Correction 

In the last issue of the MainSheet we inadvertently gave 
credit for the O'Neill Center article to Erica Mathews. 
We also spelled O'Neill incorrecfly in the article. We 
apologize for any inconvience this may have caused. 



nagHHB 



page 12 MainSheet October 7, 1993 



Back Page 



Stag e: 



Whaf s Happening? 



Zeiterion Theater 
ALADDIN (children's the- 
ater) 

Saturday, October 16, 10;30 
a.m. 

Tickets are S5.00 general ad- 
mission 

For reservations call (508) 
994-2900 

THE BOY WHO 
WANTED TO TALK TO 
WHALES (Beyond Adven- 
ture Series) 

Sunday, October 24, 2:00 
p.m. 

Tickets are $7.50 general ad- 
mission 

For more info call Donna 
Fisher-Jackson (508) 997- 
5664 

CHARLOTTE'S WEB 

(schooltime show) 
Wednesday, October 27, 
10:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. 
Thursday, October 28, 9:30 
a.m. & 12:30 p.m. 
Tickets are $4.00 for a.m. 
show & $3.50 p.m. show 
For more info call (508) 994- 
2900 



EMMYLOU HARRIS 
CHRISTMAS SHOW 

(Country music) 

Friday, December 10, 7:00 

p.m. 



Tickets are $18.50, $22.50, 

& $26.50 

For more info call (508) 994- 

2900 

THE NUTCRACKER 
(Holiday Ballet) 

Sunday, December 19, 2:00 

& 7:00 p.m. 

Tickets are $12,00, $16.00, 

& $20.00 

For more info call (508) 994- 

2900 

SUNIPLE GIFTS 

(Children's Theater) 
Wednesday, December 22, 
10:30 a.m. 

Tickets are $5.00 general ad- 
mission 

For more info call (508) 994- 
2900 

CURIOUS GEORGE 

(Schooltime show) 
Wednes/iay, January 12, 
10:00 a/in. & 12:30 p.m. 
Thursday, January 13, 9:30 
a.m. & 12:30 p.m. 
Tickets are $4.00 for a.m. 
show & $3.50 for p.m. show 

MUR-MUR (Children'sthe- 
ater) 

Sunday, January 16,2:00pjn. 
Tickets are $7.50 general ad- 
mission 

For more info call (508) 994- 
2900 

THE SNOW QUEEN 

(Children's theater) 



Saturday, January 29, 10:30 
a.m. 

Tickets are $5.00 general ad- 
mission 

For more info call (508) 994- 
2900 

Music and 
Arts: 

Rnyall Noysc choral group 

Lunatics, Lovers and Poets 
Friday, October 1 5 - 8 P. M . at 
CCCC 

S7 general admission, $5 se- 
niors & students 
For info call 771-8771 

Cape Cod Conservatory of 
Music and Arts: 

Those students interested in 
joining the Conservatory 
Wind Ensemble, String En- 
semble, or the "A Cappella 
Choir" are encouraged to con- 
tact the Conservatory at (5 8) 
362-2772 

Seminars & 
Workshops: 

MBTI TYPE Workshops 

Fall '93 

Introductory workshops: 

Oct. 19 & 21, 2:00 -3:00 

p.m. L102 

Oct. 25, 27, & 29, 12:00- 

1:00 p.m. LI 02 



Nov. 8, 10, & 12,12:00- 
1:00 p.m. L102 
Nov. 30, & Dec. 2, 9:30 - 
11:00 a.m. L102 

Issues Workshops: (for par- 
ticipants who have taken 
MBTI) 

October 26, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. 
L102 Type and Personality 
November 8, 3 :00 - 4:00 p.m. 
LI 02 Type and Couples 
November 16, 9:30 - 10:30 
a.m. LI02 Type and Learn- 
ing 

December 8, 2:00-3:00 p.m. 
LI 02 Type and Careers 

Dealing with stress work- 
shop 

weekly meeting. Wed & 
Thurs.3:15to4:15 
CCCC upper commons 
Classes are free and open to 
all students 

Sponsored by the Adult Re- 
entry Center 

Toparticipate inaworkshop, 
sign up at the Counseling Cen- 
ter, Administration Building. 
All sessions are held in the 
Library/Learning Resources 
Center-Conference Room 
(L102). 



sity students desiring to have 
their poetry anthologized. 
Cash prizes will be awarded 
to the top 5 poems. Deadline 
is October 3 1 . Contest rules 
available at the MainSheet 
office. 

TheNational Library of Po- 
etry Contest 

To enter send one original 
poem, any subject or style to 
Tlie National Library of Po- 
etry, 11419 Cronridge Dr., 
P.O.Box 704-ZI, Owings 
Mills, MD 21117. Entries 
should be postmarked by Sep- 
tember30. New contest opens 
October 1,1993. 

Intermural 
sports & 
activities: 

Bodyworks class 

Low impact aerobics, 
step,cardiovascular condi- 
tioning, gutbusters and ton- 
ing, stretching andrelaxation, 
nutrition information. 
Mon- Wed -Fri, 11 to 12 
P.M. in the Gymnasium 



Contests: 

National College Poetry 
Contest 

Open to all college & univer- 



11-4 



Basketball 

Tues.& Thurs 
Volleyball 

Mon. & Fri, 2-4 
Indoor Soccer 

Wed. & Fri. 12-2 



Floor Hockey 

Mon. & Fri. 2-4 
All sign-up sheets for 
intermural sports are posted 
in the Life Fitness Center. 

Community 
projects: 

Take Back The Night 
RallySpeak Out Against 

ViolenceMonday, October 

11,1993 

5 p.m. gathering at the 

Hyannis Green 

7 p.m. march down Main 
Street 

8 p.m. rally/speak out 
Organized by Independence 
House and the Clothesline 
Project 

Ice Cream Social benefiting 
Mass Breast Cancer Coali- 
tion 

October 15, 6:30- 8:30 p.m. 
Our Lady of Victory Parish 
Hall, So. Main St. Centerville 
Tickets available at any 
Puritans, Ben & Jerry's, 
Hyannis or at the door, $3.00 
per Sundae. 
For more info call 77 1-2143 



Your activity or event will 
be. published in the 
MmnSheets Wliat's Happen- 
ing on a space available ba- 
sis. Please send submissions 
to the MainSheet in the care 
of Cindy Steinmueller. 



132 VARIETY & DELI 



Special Sub Mon - Fri for only $1.32 

AVOID THE WAITANP CALL AHEAP 362-3311 

Roast 3eef. , . 2.95 4.05 Turkey. . . 2.95 4.05 

Italian... 2.65 3.65 Faetrami... 2.65 3.65 

Salami & Cheeee. . . 2.55 3.A6 Meatball. . . 2.55 3.55 

Ham or dolo^na & Cheese. . . 2.45 3.35 

Chicken Salad... 2.95 3.95 

Seafood Salad. . : 3.05 4.05 Tuna Salad. . . 2.65 3.65 

Included are: lettuce, tomato, picklee, onions, 

hot peppers, mayonnaise & mustard 

Hot Do03. . . 1.23 Clam Chowder. . . 1.50 

Meats & Salads Available by the Foundl 

fresh Froduce, Beach Supplies, Cigarettes, Lottery Tickets, 

Maps, film, Batteries, Sundries, Beverages, Ice and morel 

Coffee • Donuts • Full line of Bakery Froducts 

Rte, 132, Hyannis- Across from the Hampton Inn 

(1/2 mi. south of route 6) 



Your monthly horoscope, will it bring you 
money, love, or good health? 



Weekly CCCC 



News 



•ctober 21.1993 Volume XIV Free 



Worst riot in campus 

1 • J Smokers and non-smokers 

tllStOry battle it out! 



Professor 



• • 



joins in 

Communist 

march 





President Kraus cashes in 
for new entertainment 
center 



Pressure in the Science building leads to faculty coup 



Special Student Profile 
featuringMTV's 
Beavis and Butthead 




AoUS 



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ot<v^ 



^^^'t;:v-«^'^^' 



bringing bad math skills 





Coup quelled on campus quad 



by John Reed 

Bolshevik Math- 
ematician, Vladimir 

MacAdamov, surrendered 

today after leading an 

aborted campus coup. The 

bloody violence erupted 

yesterday after a long 

running policy dispute 

between the radicals and 

radicands. MacAdamov, an 

outspoken exponent for the 

radicals, had been conspiring 

for the roots of power in the 

Science Hall. 

In a secret pre-dawn 

meeting, MacAdamov ranted 

and raved about the laissez- 
faire attitude of the radi- 
cands. He was particularly 

macadamant against the 

liberal use of conjugate 
terms. " They do nothing 
but conjugate all day long in 
the math lab," he screamed, 
" their doing a real number 
in there". 

MacAdamov, who is a 
strict advocate of squared 

terms, has been at odds with the "bourgeoisie" establish- 
ment of President Kraus. " Tliey should all go back to 
elementary algebra," he said," their nothing but a bunch of 
PiKeyites and they need to be stopped in their tracts." 

He was recently outraged that his terms for 
squaring the campus quad were no longer a factor and that 
his plan to erect a statue in honor of marxist visionary 




Vladimir MacAdamov surrenders after coup attempt 



Pythagoras was canceled out by Kraus. 

Reaching a feverish pitch the incensed 
MacAdamov screamed " I've vsraited long enough for that 
erection. It's time to take matters into my own hands." 
The radicals then mixed up a pitcher of Molotov cocktails 
and proceeded to paint all the campus ICrauswalks red. 

Stirred but not shaken by these events.a sour 



Professor found in former 
Soviet Union 



Kraus rallied campus security with a stirring rendition of 
"edelweiss." " I've never heard such bolshevik," he said, 
"these red beard radicals are kaput." 

A defiant MacAdamov insisted that the students 
were not being given the right angle on the Pythagorean 
theorem. While being led away he raised his fist and 
cried out " to see a square you have to be square and 1 am 
a square." 




CCCC Professor Dan McCuolough leads a march in support of Boris Yeltsin. 

Dumbfounded students had been unable to understand the disappearance of 
Professor Dan McCullough until this week when a photograph in a London daily paper 
ceased their anxieties. 

According to the London Evening Sloth, Mr. McCullough led a North American 
coalition on a march through the streets of Moscow in support of President Borris Yeltsin. 

Mr. McCullough, who until recently had been thought a Communist sympathizer, 
organized a group of more that 10,000 North Americans who wanted to proclaim thier 
support of the former Soviet Union's efforts towards democracy. 

Rapid travel between the U.S. and Europe was made possible for Mr. McCullough 
and his colleagues when two former right-wing extremists fi-om New York hijacked the 
Concorde en route to Paris in an effort to gain total autonomy. The pilots of the aircraft were 
given an opportunity to experiment with their anarchistic 
ideologies and joined forces with the hijackers. 

Tlie Concorde landed in Canada where Mr. McCullough and his cohorts boarded. 
Because the actions of the coalition are considered in the best interest of democracy , neither 
the hijackers, pilots or McCullough's group will suffer legal repercussions, officials said. 

As for his classes, Mr. McCullough told the Evening Sloth that he'll be back in the 
U.S. as soon as he is ensured that President Yeltsin has everything under control. 






In his newest attempt to expand Cape Cod Community College beyond the confines 
of anyone's imagination, President Dick Kraus has closed the deal on the purchase of 1 0.OOC 
acres of wetlands in (you guessed it) Hyannis. 

The president plans to drain the land and build a theme park which he callsj 
"CoUegeland." The park will include many games such as "Diuik the Monk," featuring Jol 
French (Part-time only); "Financial Aid Roulette," in which a spin of the wheel will deci^ 
your financial aid award; and also, the very popular "Pin the Blame on Everyone Else,' 
old college standard. 

In addition to the many games, ftm-fiUed rides like the "Math-Requirement Rolli 
Coaster," and the giant "GPA Slide," are sure to keep everyone screaming. 

When asked from where funding for the park would come. President Kraus answei 
"The same place where all the money for my fiivolous ventures comes from, silly! 
students!" 

The president explained, "Students need to realize who they're benefitting by pa; 
higher tuition and fees." When asked to elaborate, tlie president laughed and said, "ME! 
students benefit me! Geez, where'd you go to college?" 

Not all members of the college community are pleased with the new expansion pi; 
Phourti Owers, Director of Student Activities whined, "This is just another example of [( 
president's] overwhelming personality ruling the campus. He's always making us have 
much fim. I hate that. Why can't President Kraus get a grip on his crazy sense of humor!' 

Dean Spineless, speaking anonymously, said "Every time 1 go into one of those si 
Board of Trustee meetings, 1 laugh so hard, I can't focus. I just raise my hand and say, "Yei 
yes, yes," and I never know until later what I said yes to. Those trxistees, and especiall 
Dickie, oh, they just bust my gut!" 

There are three members of the student body who will be fighting President Kraus 
the way on the theme park plan: Tom Edwards, Senate President: Robbie MacDonali 
Student Trustee; and Joe Bell, Senate Vice-president. 

In a recent interview, all agrees with Robbie MacDonald when he said, "We're 
gii 'em this time." 

Joe Bell added, "I'm gunna git me a fightin' tattoo, and soon's we git Robbie-here' 
bike outa the shop, we're goin' in." 

Thomas Edwards concluded by saying, "Yup." 



'»4PP^ 




Sj-^Ad^ffU/SS^ 




White witches and 
All Hallows Eve 

Page 6 



Review: 
Eric Bogosian 

Page 5 



Take Back the 
Night 




Brown Bag Lunch: 
A visit from ParUment 

Page 2 



M^TN SHEET 



October 21, 1993 



Issue no. Volume XIV 



Cape Cod Community College West Barnstable. MA 



Distributed FREE 



'Where have all the flowers gone?^ 

James Cavaco, a former student at the college, died in Mogadishu on October 3 



(Editor's note: This article first appeared in the Cape Cod Times on Sunday, October 10.) 
by Professor Dan McCullough 

Where have all the soldiers gone? 
Gone to graveyards, everyone. 
When will they ever learn, 
when will they ever learn? 

- "Where Have All the Flowers Gone? " 



I saw a very moving film this past summer. It was 
aFrenchlilm titled, "Indochine." It was the story of Vietnam 
from the beginning of the French occupation. The story in 
the film ended in 1 954. No rational person, having seen what 
the French experience was in Vietnam could everunderstand 
how anyone could ever try to invade and occupy that country 
again. 

And yet, 10 years later, in 1964, the United States 
was there doing the same thing the French were doing, 
making the same mistakes. And, like the French, we were 
driven out in failure and disgrace. Ten years and 58,000 
American lives later we fled Vietnam, winning nothing, 
proving nothing, after a war that divided our country in many 
ways. All for nothing. 

I hadn't thought about the movie imtil I heard about 
Jim Cavaco of Sandwich this past week. 

Jim Cavaco graduated from Upper Cape Cod Re- 
gional Vocational Technical School in 1985. He worked 
around the Upper Cape for a few years, went to Cape Cod 
Community College for a while, and, like a lot of other yotmg 
guys in their early 20s these days, was trying to find some- 
thing that really excited him. A job, a career, you know. 

Two years ago this past week, he found that some- 
thing he was looking for. He joined the U.S. Army. His 
brother and friends said that he had finally found what he was 
looking for. 

He got himself into excellent physical and emo- 
tional shape before he even went into the Army, and he soon 
qualified in the Army Rangers, an elite corps of specially 



trained soldiers. Not many of 
the folks who enlist in the 
Army try out for the Rangers, 
andnotall whotry outmake it. 
They are a singular and proud 
unit. 

In August, Jim was 
sent to Mogadishu, Somalia, 
in connection with the humani- 
tarian effort the United States 
had begun to help the belea- 
guered people there. 

You'd only go there 
if compelled by responsibility 
or duty. Jim Cavaco, a good 
soldier, went there through 
duty- duty to follow the orders of his commanding officers 
and his commander and his chief , the president of the 
United States. He loved his new career and, from what 
family and friends said this past week, he was the kind of 
young guy who grabbed things with gusto and worked hard 
at whatever was the job at hand. 

Jim Cavaco never got a chance to celebrate his two 
years in the Army. On October 3, he died with 1 1 other 
Americans in a raid in Mogadishu. 

The photo was taken at the beginning of the year 
while Jim was still with the 75th Ranger Regiment at Fort 
Benning, Ga. 

The photo shows a well-built young man, in a 




Jim Cavaco in uniform 



form-fittingU.S. Armyuniform. The ribbons and medals are 
about what you'd expect from a guy who'd been in the 
service for 15 months. His face is clean shaven and his 
Rangers beret sits squarely on a close-shaven head. The eyes 
are averted a little bit to his right. The expression on the face 
is of self-confidence mixed with h^piness or contentment. 
This is the picture of a man happy with where he is and what 
he's doing. 

But it's also a picture of a young American who is 
dead. Killed in a foreign country thousands of miles from 
here. Killed by citizens of that country who resent our 
sending soldiers there to tell them how to run their coimtry. 
Killed by citizens who don't want our help, thank you. 



Higgins Gallery features vintage photographs 




I ~J- 




Onlookers gaze at vintage photos 

by Tom Redmond 

A splendid exhibition of vintage photographs by 
EugeneAtget and Berenice Abbott opened the fall season of 
the Higgins Art Gallery on Friday, October 8. The exhibi- 
tion, which nuis through November 27, is entitled "Docu- 
ments pour Artistes: Atget's Paris, Abbott's New York." On 
display are over fifty images of late 19th century Parisian 
street scenes and mid-20th century New York. 

Ann Lloyd, who is the curator of the gallery, explained 
that there is a direct influence on Abbott from Atget. She 
said, "The photographs all have a strong narrative quality... 



both photographers capture the vanisliing landscape of their 
era." Lloyd went on to say that Atget did not consider himself 
an artist but simply amaker of documents. These documents 
were to be used as reference points for artists, thus "Docu- 
ments pour Artistes" read the sign on liis door. Scholars still 
debate whether Atget's time suspended photographs are art 
or not, she said. 

According to a pamphlet written by Lloyd, "Atget's 
place in art and photographic history was fixed when his 
work was discovered by Man Ray, the American surrealist, 
who was working in Paris in the early twenties." Berenice 
Abbott was Man Ray's assistant. She was only twenty seven 
when she became aware of Atget's work. "Atget's remark- 
able clear vision had deeply impressed her and forever 
changed her career." Lloyd has written. 

Abbott returned to New York City m 1 928, a year after 
Atget's death. She had acquired all of his archives. Still 
under Atget's influence she became obsessed with photo- 
graphing the city. A Federal Arts Project eventuaVy fimded 
this endeavor, which resulted in an exhibition at the Museum 
of the City of New York in 1937. The project was titled 
"Changing New York." 

The photographs are displayed with a simplicity which 
reveals the continuity of style from the older Atget to the 
younger Abbott, Lloyd said. One photograph by Abbott 
anchors both sections of the show. It is entitled "Shoeshine 
Parlor, Fulton and Pearl Streets, New York." Lloyd said she 
chose this photograph because it made a nice transition from 
Atget to Abbott "It could easily be mistaken for an Atget if 
one didn't notice the American signs in the window," she 



said. In critiquing the photographers, Lloyd said that they 
both had strong compositional form and "they both found the 
aesthetic and historical value in the ordinary." 

This exhibition is through the courtesy of the Cherry 
Stone Gallery in Wellfleet. Berenice Abbott, who died in 
1991 at the age of 93, was a lifelong friend of gallery owner 
Sally Nerber. The images on display were acquired by Ms. 
Nerber over the years of their friendship. 



Main Sheet Poll 

Is the president doing the 
right thing by sending more 
troops to Somalia? 



1 00 sluiJents surveyed randomly. 

28% feel more troops 
should be sent. 



24% are undecided 
about the issue. 



48% disagree with sending more troops. 



page 2 Mainsheet October 21, 1993 



Campus News 



A taste of Britain at Brown Bag Lunch 



by Michele Auclair 

A member of Great Britain's Parliament spoke at the 

Tildeii Arts Center last Thursday. Michael Caitiss, of the 
House of Lords, discussed King Arthur, politics and televi- 
sion as part of this fall's Brown Bag Lunch series. 

Audience members inquired about Britain's opinion of 
the Clinton administration, and the proposed North Ameri- 
can Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Mr. Cartiss said the 
Conservative Party came to the United States to advise the 
Bush campaign, but that the Labor Party welcomed Clinton. 
He said Bush was viewed by most as having more interna- 
tional experience than Clinton. 

Regarding NAFTA. Mr. Cartiss believes it's a good 
idea for the long term, though he admits there will be short 
term problems. He related a similar situation faced by Great 
Britain when merging Spain and Portugal in the Common 
Market. 

Mr. Cartiss expressed only good will toward the United 
States, and especially Cape Cod. He discussed the cotinec- 
tion between Yarmouth and the city from which it got its 
name. Great Yannouth. England. The name Yarmouth was 
carried here, he explained, not necessarily by settlers from 
Great Yarmoutli. but by those for whom the place was their 
first port-of-call on their journey to North America. He and 
others have "developed and fostered a link," with Yannouth 
through an organization cal led Yarmouth International, which 
also includes Yannouth. Nova Scotia. Professor Michael 
Olendzenski, an expert on Arthurian Legend, attended the 
lunch and asked about the legendary king. Cartiss explained 
that as an English teacher many years ago, he expected his 
1 1- to 18-year-old students to have some knowledge of the 
legend. Images from the life and times of King Arthur appear 
in the decorations and murals of the West Palace, he said. He 
does his '"bit to promote the legend," and that "it's good for 
tourism," he added. 

Cartiss said the young students he takes on tours of the 
palace these days are not that familiar with the King Arthur 
legend. "It seems they've lumped history, geography and 
metalwork into one category, and [the students] come out 
knowing metalwork," he declared. 

Cartiss said he noticed an influence by television on 
today's youth, e\ idem in their speech. Tlie word lieutenant, 
for example, had been pronounced 'left-tenant." Now, with 
so niajiy American police stories on the air. the pronunciation 
is changing to "loo-tenani." Additionally, inspectors in his 
country's police force are beiny referred to lieutenant as 





§% 




1 


^ 


i 



well, he stated. M.P. Michael Cartiss 

With the televised Parliamentary proceedings in mind, 
an audience member asked Cartiss, "What would constitute a 
breach of etiquette in the House of Commons? Have there ever 
been any fistfights?" 

"No," Cartiss replied. "We just shout at each other, and 
only on prime-time." Calling another member a liar or 
hypocrite is unacceptable, as well as referring to someone by 
name. He explained that one must use the title "Honorable 
Member of Great Auk," or whaitever place the person repre- 
sents. 

Cartiss said he voted against Parliament being televised 
on the basis that "all progress is bad, and television progress is 
even worse." It might soiuid patronizing or secretive that the 
governing body doesn't want to appear on television, he 
admitted. "But television has no interest in presenting people 
agreeing with each other." 

Tliere are more people than places to sit. he said, and the 
chances of being able lo speak aren't good. He said he deals 
with more issues in Parliament than a U.S. Senator faces, and 
feelings of fhistratioii commonly result in the loud voices and 
short tempers television viewers witness. 



Borrowing money, a double edged sword 



by Jon Coutinho 

Since 1965banks have been loaning students money 
for their college education through the Stafford Loan Pro- 
gram. "Since 1965 students have been trying not to pay the 
money back, " said Michael Cuff, director of Financial Aid 
here at CCCC. 

According to Mr. Cuff, these loans were guaranteed 
by the government and have cost the taxpayers billions of 
dollars. "Just the administrative and legal costs to assiune 
these feulty loans has motivated Congress to cut out the 
middle man (banks) and loan the money directly," He said . 



Fall College Transfer Program 

In the Cafeteria from 10 a.m.- noon 



October 25 Monday 
Boston University 
Bridgewater State 
Endicott College 
Johnson & Wales 
Lasell College 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Regis College 
Sinunons College 
Suffolk University 
Wentworth College 
Western New England 
Wheelock College 

October 26 Tuesday 
Castleton State 
Northeastern University 
Salem State 
Stonehill College 
UMASS Boston 

October 27 Wednesday 
Elms College 
Mertimack College 



October 28 Thursday 
North Adams State 
Wellesley College 

October 29 Friday 

Bay Path College 

Bryant College 

Mass College of Pharmacy 

Mass Maritime 

Mount Ida 

Pine Manor 

ST. Joseph's 

UMASS Amherst 

UMASS Dartmouth 

University of Rhode Island 

Westfield State 

Worcester State 

November 4 Thursday 
UMASS Lowell 



This change in the Stafford Loan Program will be 
phased in over the next three years." Eventually eliminating 
the need for bank loans," said Mr. Cuff. 

Mr. Cuff emphasized, "Bortowing money to pay for 
schooling is a double edged sword. I hate to see students 
leave here with a five figure debt ...but for some it is their 
only chance at continuing their education." He also said that 
students should only bortow what they absolutely need and 
prospective bortowers must be carefiil to weigh all other 
options. They should think about the responsibility of paying 
the loan back. 

According to the loan agreement, six months after 
you are no longer in school your loan payments become due. 
It also states that the only way to be absolved from this debits 
to become completely disabled or die. 

A recent article in the Boston Globe said that the 
statewide student loan default rate is 8.7% and the national 
default rate is a whopping 17.5%. CCCC seems to be 
attracting more responsible students who renege only 7.6% 
of the time. The Globe went on to say that there is more 
Stafford Loan money in default than all other financial aid 
money combined, 2.6 billion dollars last year alone. 

When the Massachusetts Higher Education Assis- 
tance Corporation (MHEAC) assumes yoiu'outstanding loan, 
state and federal law permits them to seize all future tax 
reftmds and your federal, state and local business licenses of 
any kind. They can even garnish your wages until the note 
and all related legal fees are paid. 

"This is serious busmess and these guys aren't 
fooling around," declared Mr. Cuff. "I' ve been out of school 
for ten years and I'm still paying off my student loans... on 
time." He added with a smile. 

The one thing that the director wants to impress 
upon potential borrowers at CCCC is that for some the 
Stafford Loan Program is a great way to pay for their college 
education. BUT, "make sure you understand exactly what 
your getting yourself into... student loans will affect your 
credit for life," He said. 



News Briefs 



CCCC FaU Blood Drive 

Wesnesday, Oct 27, 1 0:00 am to 3:00 pm, at the 
gym. Sign up for an appointment in the cafeteria the 
week of Oct, 1 8th. You must be at least seventeen years 
old with a Red Cross permission slip and weigh at least 
105 pounds to be eligible. 

New Senate Leaders Elected at CCCC 

Lyim Folsom of Centerville was elected secre- 
tary and Deborah Currier of East Orleans is the new 
public relations officer. Sophomore senators elected are 
Shira Goldberg of Sharon, Stephan Manamon, Gregory 
Martin of East Wareham, Brian Morison of Hyannis and 
Sharin Ringelheim of East Falmouth. 

Freshmen elected to the student governance 
body are Bridgette Doyon of Marston Mills, Kristen 
Jensen of Cataumet, Michelle Marsh of Sagamore, Rob- 
ert McDaniel of East Sandwich, David Moriarty of 
Waquoit, Erica Muncey of West Yarmouth, Rocerick 
Potter of Plymouth, Ken Roche of Plymouth and Chelsea 
Thompson of South Yannouth. 

Storage space desperately needed 

Storage space for CCCC rowing shells from 
Nov 1st through April 1st. Also a boat motor for crew 
launch is needed in the 7 to 
15 horsepower range, please contact Loretta ext: 368 

Brown bag events 

The theme of this year's brown bag events is 
multiculturalism. To accomodate all persons who desire 
to attend, some events will be scheduled on Wednesdays 
at noon in additon to the regularly scheduled Thursdays 
at 12:30. 

Native American Presentation 

Linda Coombs, a Gay Head Wampanoag, will 
make a presentation on Native Americans Friday, Octo- 
ber 15 at 9 a.m. in C- 106 at CCCC. Ms. Coombs will 
choose pieces of Native literature to illustrate her peo- 
ple's attitudes toward the world and earth. Admission is 
free to both students and the general public. 

Gosnold President to Speak 

Raymond Tomasi, president of Gosnold Treat- 
ment Facility in Falmouth, will speak to a professional 
development program at CCCC on alchol abuse among 
the elderly. His presentation, sponsored by CCCC's 
Center for Successful Aging, will be held in room C- 1 06 
on October 28 from 4 to 6 p.m. Cost is $5, $ 1 5 for RN's 
wishing toeamC.E.U.s. Formore information call Carla 
Priest at 362-2131, ext.386. 

WE'RE BACK... 

WKKL 90.7 FM, your college alternative, met- 
al rap, reggae radio station, is back on the air! Weekdays, 
7 p.m. to 1 a.m. Weekends, 12 noon to 1 a.m. 

Nursing Program Re-Accredited 

The nursing degree program at CCCC has been 
re-accreditied for the maximum time possible, 8 years, 
by the National League for Nursing. 



Come & Play With Us 

Janus Players 

Cape Cod Community College's 
Theatre Company 

Meet Thursday 
October 28-6 p.m. 

Tilden Arts Center Lobby 



Editorial 



October 21, 1993 Mainsheet page 3 



Through ill-gotten gains 



by Tom Redmond 



No photo 
available 



I must confess that I have 
never quite understood why it is 
that the Native American Indians 
are allowed to run gambling casi- 
nos in states that do not allow 
gambling. What really puzzles 
me, though, is the fact that they don't pay taxes on their 
enterprises. In my politically incorrect ignorance it just 
doesn't seem right that me and every other "native bom 
american" must bear an unfair burden of politically correct 
taxes to support the infrastruc- 
ture of our government, a sys- ^^^^^i^SiSii^^^^iS^ 
tern from which we all share 
the benefits. 

I've recently been in- 
formed that the Native Ameri- 
cans are a sovereign nation, 
and that these privileges are 
meager compensation for all 
the injustices inflicted upon ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
them over the years. Because 

their land was taken from them, the Native Americans never 
had a chance to develop the wealth of this land and reap it's 
rewards. 

Think of what Manhattan is worth. Think of all the 
wealth that Old Cape Codders, such as the Nickersons, 
Crowells and Elderidges, have accrued over the years, 
through ill gotten gains. 

I'm a native bom American and I've yet to see a 
dime out of Manhattan nor have 1 inherited any benefits of 
accmed wealth. I am third generation Irish, a descendant of 
those forced out of their native land and a beneficiary of a 
legacy of discrimination and genocide under the heel of 
soulless tyranny. 



Controversy surrounds 
proposed gambling casino 

The vast majority of inhabitants of this country are 
"native bom Americans" whose ancestors fled here, wave 
after wave, escaping the bondage of untold cmelty and 
oppression in their native lands. 

We natives have yet to receive any special compen- 
sation or privilege other than the right to make oiu" own boot 
straps. 

We are all part of a humanity who shares a long 
cyclical history of oppression and violence. 

Special perks and privileges perpetuate the cycle of 
discrimination. This can only 
^^^^^^^i^^^^^:^^ divide us as a nation of men 
and diminish our universal- 
ity. If one needs to remain 
separate and stay exclusively 
ensconced in one's own cul- 
ture, so be it. 

However, I 
think it weakens the potential 
^^"^^^-^^^^ of our social network and di- 

minishes our chances for sur- 
vival as a race of men. 

If a race of people feels so exalted that they choose 
to live separate and more than equal in a pluralistic society, 
that does not offend me. Ijust don't want to pay for it. I don't 
think their system should drain our economy. 

This charade has got to stop! The Indians may 
predate the rest of us but somebody predated them some- 
where. There are a lot of races on this earth who have been 
discriminated against a lot longer than the Indians. We must 
live in the present. The Indians, who are not citizens and do 
not pay taxes, have no more right than any other minority to 
petition our government for special privilege. 



MMNSHEFT 



'Indians, who are not citizens 
and do not pay taxes, have no 
more right than any other mi- 
nority.' 



Editorial Staff 

Sheila Johnson 
Michele Queenan 
Kevin Moulton 



Beverly Delaney 
David Whitmore 
Jack Higgins 
Tom Redmond 
Katie Banis 
Vincent Raimo 
Roy Rider 
Charles Thibodeau 
Cindy Steinmueller 
Darlene Mokrycki 
William Babner 



Editor in chief 

Focus 

Features 

Photos 

Photos 

Entertainment 

Campus News/ 

Parody issue/Women's Issues 

Graphics 

Advertising 

Editorial/ Opinion 

Campus Life 

Copy 

Faculty Advisor 



Sherry Aheam 
Michele Auclair 
Laurel Bloom 
Nancy Brennan 
Jon Coutino 
Sarah Curley 
Jennifer Dixon 
Brian Ford 
Evan Foster 
Amy Gold 



Contributors 



Ada Kelly 

Robert Koenig 

Terri Ladd 

Martha Love 

Erica Mathews 

Melissa Phaneuf 

Walter Rivieccio 

Erin Rose 

Bryan Russell 

Jayme Wood 



Letters Policy: Letters must include the 
water's name in order to be published. 
MainSheet reserves the right to edit to suit 
length and style requirements. We regret 
that we cannot accept poetry. 



The MainSheet is a member of 

NECNA 

(New England Collegiate 

Newspaper Association) 



Don't feel guilty, just give blood and give the gift of life 



iy Nancy Brennan 

Yes, it's that time again—time to summon up your 
X)urage and roll up your sleeves. Time to say, "Hey, I'm not 
ifraid of needles." Time to give the gift of life; blood, that 
s. 

The Red Cross will be here on October 27, from 1 
\.m. to 3 p.m. in the Gym and just in time for Halloween, all 
^ou vampire lovers. You should be there too! Arms ready 
md fear swallowed, with the knowledge that you may be 
saving the life of a sick little kid, a fragile oldman, a seriously 
njured mother, or a struggling AIDS victim. 

Many of us seem to think only of ourselves when 
hat sign-up sheet for blood donors comes around. "It's 
jQing to hurt, I'm going to feel sick, and It'll be a waste of 
jme are among our selfish excuses. 

We tend not to think of what the motivation is 
behind an organization like the Red Cross. It's certainly not 
!he money nor political clout. It is a simple desire to provide 



those in need with the very liquid which could signify the 
difference between life and death. 

Eighty percent of the people in this coimtry will use 
blood at one time or another. That means that you, your mom 
or dad, your little boy or girl or someone else you know, will 
need blood. Yet, only four percent of eligible people in this 
country give blood! Imagine the budget deficit we would 
have if people paid taxes like they give blood! 

Don't feel guilty if you haven't given blood. In- 
stead, take a look at the reasons why you haven't and decide 
whether they make any sense. You can't get AIDS from 
giving blood. You won't die from amassive puncture woimd 
from the needle (a little, bitty pinch, maybe). Anemia is not 
apermanent condition in all people. Eating before donating 
scares awaythe faints. Hey, if it'samatterof giving up some 
of your time, then consider the little boy in the hospital who 
is losing his entire childhood to a disease that drains the life 



Student Objects to "Outsider Insults" 



To the Editor: 

I would like to respond to Mr. Scott Dickie 's letter 
which appeared in the September 23rd issue of the 
MainSheet. 

In your letter, Mr. Dickie, you found it necessary 
to remind "college students of "certain rights" with regard 
to a particular professor's conduct. Are we to conclude by 
your reminder that we are incapable of deciphering right 
from wrong, and are in need of arbifration? Let this student 
body be informed that Mr. Dickie is neither a student here 
nor a faculty member, and though he is a community 
member at large, his untimely interference clearly implies 
to me a self-serving interest in gaining clientele. 

Moreover, I am highly insulted to leam that you 
feel the need to form your "own committee" to look into the 
"matter." How dare you imply an incompetence on the part 
of this college to address its issues! Music may be an easy 
subject to understand, Mr. Dickie, but how to engineer the 
change of implacable verbal abuse within the confines of 
tenure is not. 

Cape Cod Community College is neither ignorant 
of, nor apathetic toward Dr. Robert Kidd's manner, yet we 
will not participate in kind to effect vindictive results. 

Do 1 mean to say that this college has resolved the 
matter of Dr. Kidd's insufferable unprofessionalism? No, 
absolutely not. Nor do I mean to say that the grievance 



process for the students here js equitable—it is still a ciunber- 
some process which works against students. But it is a 
process in revision and there are parties here working hard for 
the improvement of professionalism on all levels, while 
striving to maintain the dignity and integrity of all con- 
cerned. 

. In addition, this student senator will not now nor in 
the future entertain any discussion with you with regard to 
Dr. Kidd or other feculty members here. Be consoled, 
however, that if we as an enlightened student body, a more 
than qualified faculty and an empathetic administration 
cannot, or worse, will not keep abreast of its conflicts and 
work cohesively to resolve them, then we will readily admit 
to having no business calling ourselves an institution of 
higher learning— then watch the resulting lack of financial 
support shut this college down. 

Yes, indeed, Sir, we may be "stuck," but it will not 
be with the spirit of divisiveness which is counterproductive 
to those seeking to bring resolution the conditions surround- 
ing Dr. Kidd and other issues pertinent to our college family; 
rather, we vnll stmggle forward carefully, yet decidedly, into 
the future and we will address the subject of Dr. Kidd's 
abuse— whose time has come— and we will have done so, not 
only with success, but with respect. 

Deborah Curier 



from his small body. You could make the difference between 
his life or death. 

Don't feel guilty. Even though there are very few 
medical conditions which prohibit you from giving blood. 
Don't just assimie that because you have an existing health 
problem you are automatically ineligible to donate blood. 
You'd be surprised! Also just because you have a tatoo, you 
are not automatically off the hook either. As long as it's more 
than a year old, they'll take your blood. Think of the poor 
woman with six children who has hemophilia and is always 
in need of blood transfusions. She needs you. 

Don't feel guilty. Just give. If you can't give, offer 
your help to the Red Cross staff by handing out cookies and 
juice, by holding someone's hand while they donate, or by 
escorting a friend who's feeling nervous. Always remember 
the thousands of faces being helped by the Red Cross. 

'Help these kids' 

To the Editor: 

This letter is a request to the entire CCCC 
conununity. I work at The Childrens Study Home in 
Falmouth. This is a residential program for teenagers age 
12 to 18. We are a non-profit organization that helps 
Cape and Island kids who are having problems for one 
reason or another. We need help in tutoring these kids, 
they are in junior high and high school. Help is needed 
in all subjects, but math and science especially. 

We also need clothes. Some of these kids come 
to us with hardly anything, some without winter coats. If 
you have any clothes that you are not using, please 
consider dropping them off at the Student Senate office. 
They will go to a good cause. The program is co-ed so 
boy's and girl's clothes are needed. Please consider us 
before you throw away those things that don't fit any- 
more. And if you have the time to help these kids with 
their studies, let me tell you, it's worth the time. You'll 
feel good about yourself and you'll be helping a kid who 
needs it. 

Thank You, 
■ Robbie Mac Donald 
Student Trustee 



page 4 Mainsheet October 21, 1993 



Campus Life 



Faculty Commentary: Professor Ziemba ^'gives it back'' 




One of my most satisfying teaching experiences 
occurred this past month when one of my former students 
returned to work with me, but in a much different capacity. 
I had first worked with Bruce back in 1 988, when I was a GED 
instructor. Bruce had decided to get his life in order and get 
his GED high school equivalency certificate. Bruce had 
come from the tough section of a large lirban city in Massa- 
chusetts. About 40% of high school students drop out of 
school in Massachusetts cities like Lawrence, Lowel 1, Chelsea. 
Holyoke, New Bedford and Fall River. 

The GED classes were challenging for Bruce, but 



he approached each class with such determination that I was 
sure that he would be able to pass the tests. Bruce passed the 
GED exam and went on to enroll at CCCC. He was always 
grateful for the opportunity he obtained in the GED class. 
It was interesting the way our paths crossed again at 
the College. Although I never worked with Bruce in a 
learning situation, I would frequently see him around the 



"The United Sates Department 
of Education has indicated that 
as many as 47% of our adult 
population is functionally illiter- 
ate." 



campus and would pick him up when he was hitchhiking 
home from school. 

Bruce became very interested in the work that 1 did 
with the Cape Cod Literacy Council. I was training vol unteer 
tutors who would then work with students who had not 
completed high school. Although Bruce inquired about how 
to become a volunteer tutor, he was too busy studying and 
trying to succeed in college to be able to devote the time 
required to attend a training session and then work with a 
student. 

This past summer 1 ran into Bruce, and lie again 
inquired about the tutor training program and indicated he 



would like to attend the program that began in September. 
When 1 walked into the tutor training class on the first night 
of classes, 1 was a little disappointed that Bruce was not there . 
About five minutes after the class started Bruce entered the 
room just in time for introductions. 

I asked the prospective tutors to talk about their 
reasons for taking a volunteer tutor training program and 
what their goals were. Some tutors talked about their 
interest in gaining some skills so that they could improve 
their employability in the education field. The United Sates 
Department of Education has just released a study that 
indicates that as many as 47 % of our adult population is 
fimctionally illiterate. There are increasing employment 
opportunities teaching basic skills to adults. 

When it came time for Bruce to indicate his reasons 
for attending, he paused for a moment and then said, "For 
me it's about giving back." He went on to explain to his 
classmates his experiences as a learner, the difficulties he 
had in succeeding in school, and how gratefiil he was for a 
second chance. 

I'm confident that Bruce will make an outstanding 
tutor, because he will be able to bring to the tutoring 
experience a street level understanding of the problem of 
illiteracy. Bruce has been a wonderful student in the tutor 
training program and he is looking forward to working with 
his student. 

Bruce has given me the opportimity to really appre- 
ciate the importance of the work that the Literacy Council 
does. I'm excited about the possibilities for people in our 
society coming together to help each other. 



Student Survey: 

Are you aware of the high illiteracy rate? 





Rebecca Thompson 
Accounting 

"Yes, there should be a 
program for people that are 
illiterate." 



Matthew O'Hare 
Liberal Arts 

"No, I'm not. We live in a 
wealthy society, we should 
take money from the fat cats 
and put it towards education." 



Marilyn Gilfoy 
Business Management 

"No, I'm not aware of it, but 
the percenage can't be very 
accurate viith all the 
immgrants comming into the 
coimtry." 



Mark Woods 

Hotel / Rest. Management 

"No. People ought to start 

reading." 




Sue Vecchi 

Medical Adra. Assistant 

"No, if it's at 48% I think it's 
low." 



piatts ty Brfmn Russell 



Collece btudents 



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MASSACHUSETTS 




Student Profile: KeitH J. Da^s 




Name: Keith J. Davis 

Age: 25 (really) 

Hometown: CotuitBay 

Course of Study: Music, vocal performance 



What do you like best about CCCC? The opportunity to get a 
university level education at a community college. 

What do you like least about CCCC? The fact that CCCC 
is not fully accessible to handicapped students. 

What do you see yourself doing in 5 years? Music Therapy 

Who has benn your most influential professor? Dr. Robert W. 
Kidd, he has the ability to be honest, strict, motivating, and 
sincere. 

What book and movie would you recommend? The Afeiv Grove'^i 
Dictionary of Music and The Name of the Rose 

What's your pet peeve? Dealing with people who are not 
goal oriented. 

How do you spend your free time? Practicing, it's the only way 
to get to Carnegie Hall and working on my album. 

What message would you send to an alien nation?Dress in 

layers, we're going skiing! 



Tbe Anny National Guard b m Equal Opportunity Eni|)lo]rer. 



Arts & Entertainment 



Mainsheet October 21, 1993 pageS 



Bogosian: A slice of life 



fhatB tf Paub Court 



by Laurel Bloom 

For the second year in a row, I had the distinct privilege 
of seeing Eric Bogosian in his one-man show, or tirade as it 
were, at the American Repertory Theatre in Cambridge. Mr. 
Bogosian is a writer and actor, who is best known for his solo 
performances and for his play/fihn Talk Radio. An evening 
spent with him is an hour and a half of laughs, gasps, and 
insights into the psyche of the American dream, the Ameri- 
can male, and American apathy. 

In a brief interruption of his soliloquy, he addresses 
the audience directly and thanks us for "the opportunity to 
strip naked." And strip naked he does. He cutsopen the flesh 
of our apathy and squeezes lemon juice into our open 
wounds. Our journey with him takes us through characters 
ranging from an ordinary pet dog to a doctor treating an AIDS 
patient and through the rich, the poor and the indifferent. His 
study of the hiunan condition is at times funny, riveting, and 
desperately pathetic. 

Achieving all this without the assistance of sets, 
other actors and technical wizardry, we become spellbound 
by his immense talent. It is just Eric-dressed in his trade- 
mark black-a microphone, a chair, and a spotlight. His 
transcendence into his characters, would seem enciunbered 
with props. 

His first character, the dog, just wants to be one of 
the pack. Don't we all just want to be accepted? Transform- 
ing into a scratching, itching, filthy bum riding the subway, 
he expounds on a man named Frank. Frank, a middle-class 
man with a camel hair coat, rides the train every day. His 
view of Frank, is that Frank is the same as him, Frank just 
doesn't want to realize it. After all he raves, "We're all on 
the same train!" 

Eric is the recovering male in therapy, because he 
has shame for his penis. He says that he's "a human being 
trapped in a man' s body." I guess a person can't be a man and 
a human being at the same time. His repertpire of characters 
goes on and on and is always changing and making us react. 
As the show goes forward, we realize our own inconsisten- 
cies, inadequacies and prejudices. We feel stripped naked as 
well. 

My personal favorite is the doctor prescribing medi- 




Eric Bogosian 

cine to a sick patient. It's only after telling the list of possible 
side effects of the medication, that we realize the person has 
AIDS. They include: blurred vision, loss of hair, numbness 
in his extremities, nosebleeds, diminished sex drive, and 
large bleeding scabs, to name just a few. He is so desensi- 
tized, he even asks the patient to pay the $5,000 bill on the 
way out. He is imaffected by the horror he sees every day, 
because he has what he needs. This is the character that hits 
us where it hurts. 

Eric Bogosian wants us to laugh at ourselves, to 
think and to react. We are to realize how absiu'd we are in our 
quest for the American dream, materialism and status. He 
wants us to taste our insensitivity and drink it in, as well as 
take ownership of it. He forces us to discard our coat of 
complacency and become aware of the world around us. 
Forget the comforts of a middle-class American lifestyle and 
become a human being first. And more importantly, become 
humane. 

At the end of his performance, Mr. Bogosian re- 
ceivedawell-deservedstandingovation. His show however,is 
not for the easily shocked or offended, Mr. Bogosian uses 
profane language and holds nothing back. Although you may 
be put-off by his presentation, you must appreciate his 
tremendous talent. Mr. Bogosian is a modem-day rebel. He 

is the conscience of our time. 




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a Masters in Public Administration, 
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Play delves into 
womens issues 

by Michele A uclair 

Exploring womens various roles, needs, desires and 
frustrations as humans struggling for self-development, isn't 
an easy task... but it was done well by Professor P.J. McKey 
who directed the play "I Am a Woman," in Pro vincetown this 
October. 

The play has no plot; it is a series of monologues from 
many sources. Characters from Shakespeare, D.H. Lawrence 
and Anne Sexton are represented. The play features an 
interview with Charles Manson's mother, and also the diaries 
of Anne Frank and Anais Nin. This is just a sample of the 
assortment of radio and newspaper interviews, novels and 
other works of literature used as sources for this dramatic 
piece. 

One role explored significantly is that of woman as 
mother. The "German Mother" character, from "Song of a 
German Mother" by Bertolt Brecht, alludes to the responsi- 
bility a mother feels for her children's behavior. "I gave you 
those black boots and that jacket," she says, and sings, "If I 
had known what I now know, I'd have hanged myself from 
a free." The "Hungarian Mother" calls for her son to come 
back to her. She describes her pain and need for him vividly, 
but he answers that he cannot return. If he does he will hurt 
her now that he is changed. 

The role of "wife" is freated with humor, anger and 
confiision. The character Judy, from Judy Syfers' "I want a 
Wife," dresses Rosser in a rubber glove, thimbles, apron and 
mask. She lists the reasons she too would like a wife: She 
would like someone to clean, sew, cook and fiilfill her 
sexually while she pursues her own interests. Sally is a wife 
that wants the courage to bash her husband's head in while 
he sleeps. She's afraid, but not of hurting him. She's afraid 
that he'll leave her after she does it. 

One of the few obscure moments is an excerpt from the 
testimony of a North Vietnamese freedom fighter. This 
segment describes afrocities of war inflicted on pregnant 
women. It serves only to shock the audience and doesn't 
clearly relate to the other themes of the play. 

One of the play's sfrengths is that it does not condemn 
men or complain about women's "plight." It illustrates the 
many sides of women, not just as women but as humans. A 
thread of sfrength and undying spirit is woven from begin- 
ning to end. 

Barbara Rosser and Marjorie Conn are excellent per- 
formers. They move in and out of each character with 
apparent ease. They are timid housewives and roaring 
revolutionaries with equal ability. 

Sfrong literature is timeless. Most of the events 
discussed occurred, and most of the works used were written 
before I became a woman. The relevancy to my generation 
exists, however. Viveca Lindfors and Paul Austin, the 
conceivers and arrangers of "I Am a Woman," chose their 
material well. 






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page 6 Mainsheet October 21, 1993 



Features 



Take Back the Night: an evening of empowerment 

The streets aren't safe anymore; Women call for an end to rape, incest, and domestic violence 



4 V 





by Darlene Mokrycki 

"It is our basic 
humanrighttobe safe," 
was the underlying 
premise of a rally and 
march held by and for 
victims of rape, incest, 
and battering in 
Hyannis on Columbus 
Day. 

More than 150 
people braved the win- 
ter chill of the evening 
to show support for the 
victims of violence and 
to celebrate three years 
of existence of the 
plates tr Btttn HmsaU "Clothesline Project." 

The clothesline was displayed on the green in Hyannis 
where it was viewed by the gathering. On the clothesline 
hangs pieces of clothing each of which represents a victim 
and graphically depicts her story. "You can batter my body. 



(left) Shirts on the 
Clothesline, created 
by victims of violence 
and their survivors, 
blow silently in the 
breeze. 

(Below left) March- 
ers carried candles 
in the procession up 
Main Street in 
Hyannis. The march 
ended on the 
Hyannis Green with 
a speak-out against 
violence . 
but you can't kill my spirit... silent no more," was the 
inscription on one shirt; "my anger heals me" was on another. 
Following the gathering, a march was staged down 
Main Street in protestation of violence against women and 
children. Onlookers watched intense faces shouting incan- 
tations urging "women unite! Take back the night," and other 
such chants. The paraders marched in remembrance of the 
suffering of those represented by the clothesline project— 
those women and children who have been horribly violated 
by their perpetrators. 

Survival was the theme of the speak out against vio- 
lence held following the march which was organized by 
Independence House a local shelter for victims of domestic 
abuse. 

Carol Chichetto, a clothesline organizer and activist, 
said that she couldn't tell the group how much it means to 
survivors to have a clothesline to hang their shirts on to air out 
their grief 

"I'm here because I have been there," said Kate, one 
survivor present at the rally. "I'm here to show my support. 
After years of being battered, I can feel as though I can turn 
it around, and this is part of my healing," she said, referring 
to her ongoing recovery. 



White witches, who they are and what they are not 



by Beverly Delaney 

With Halloween just around the comer, it's the 
season for ghosts and goblins, witches and warlocks, and 
other creepy things that go bump in the night. 

For centuries Halloween has been observed by 
trick-pr-treating, pranks, costumes and great excuses to 
party. 'According to the dictionary, Halloween, is short for 
All Hallow Eves, with Hallow meaning - to set or make holy, 
or to respect greatly. 

Well, for some. . .the White Witches to be exact, that 
definition is taken seriously and Halloween is not only a 
celebrated but a sacred time of the year. It's the end of the 
harvest season as well as the Shamian, the time of year when 
the veil between the spiritual world and the earth is at it's 
thiimest. 

The White Witches, a legal religious group which 
will be celebrating their New Year's Eve on October 3 1 st, is 
a highly misconceived group falling into the basic stereo- 
types of witches with their evil magic and wicked spells. 

Having met with and interviewed Carol, one of the 
hundreds of White Witches Uvmg here on Cape Cod, and 
learning enough of the Wiccan religion to develop a basic 
understanding of it, it has gained my respect. 

"Unfortunately," according to Carol, "a narrow- 
minded viewpoint is still alive among many of the less aware 
people and other religions." The Wiccan religion can be 
compared to those of the Native Americans as their beliefs 
are parallel . They view nature and the earth and even our own 
bodies as sacred, along with every other living being, down 
to the tiniest ant or blade of grass, with all deserving the 
utmost respect. 

The Wiccans (or Pagans) do not worship any devil 
or demons, although this has been vigorously promoted by 
T.V. and other media sources. They don't even believe in 
them. What they do believe is that there is an unknowing and 
incomprehensible source of divine energy. It is the indi- 
vidual who ultimately takes and turns that energy into either 
good or evil. 



What they do worship is themselves as individuals. 
"We are given the wonderfiil opportimity to become indi- 
viduals and to think for ourselves," said Carol. With the 
desire and passion for life coming from within ourselves, 
Wiccans feel very strongly about the spiritual being pos- 
sessed by us all. 

One clue to a Wiccan's identity is their universal 
symbol of a pentacle which is commonly worn around the 
neck. Although the pentacle is best known for its association 



with Satanism, do not contuse the two, for the White Witches 
wear their five pointed star upside down. The five points on 
the star represent the four elements; earth, air, fire and water 
with the fifth point representing all spirits, pointing up. 

Having only positive insights and respect of the 
earth and its inhabitants, the Wiccans aren't to be feared. 
They do not criticize anyone for what they believe m, for one 
of their Golden Rules is "And it harm none, do what thou 
will." 



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"This walk empowered me to get into recovery" said 
Sue, a survivor of incest and battery. "I'm not that screwed 
up little girl I used to be," she said. "I didn't know I had a 
right to be free 'til I got mto recovery." 

"No I'm not standing for it any more," one woman 
spoke of her abuse. 

"He won the battle, but I will win the war," exclaimed 
another woman referring to an ongoing court battle with her 
perpetrator. i 

Judy Fenner, whose shirt is one of the original shirts on 
the clothesline said that the courts identify her perpetrator as 
"alleged perpetrator." "But," she said, "he is NOT my 
alleged perpetrator, he is my FATHER." She went on to say 
that these perpetrators must be identified as part of the 
prevention process and also as part of the healing process. 

Representative Robert Lawless stated that he had 
come on behalf of his colleagues to say that they stand 
opposed to this type of violence which we see more and more 
of these days. 

Wayne Bergeron spoke of wanting to bring up his 
daughter in a safe environment. 

"I was a victim, but now I'm a survivor," said another 
woman. 

"I did not deserve to be raped. We've gotta fight 
back." 

Sabrina, another survivor who spoke, said that vio- 
lence does not equal strength and that weakness doesn't 
equal compromise. 

Paula, an incest, rape, and molestation victim spoke of 
her gratitude that she could be here and in recovery. 

A man who had been an abuser was present. He 
thanked Independence House for its program which has been 
designed to enable abusers to stop abusing. His wife, a 
therapist, stated that she had helped hundreds of women 
struggle with such issues, before she had dealt with her own 
personal abuse. 

From the pain reflected in so many eyes at the vigil, 
onlookers had indeed been sensitized to the plight of those 
women who have endured torture and violence at the hands 
of batterers. 

One intonation which had resounded loudly diuing the 
march remained in the air long after the tally. It seemed to 
sum up the thoughts of the evening... "However we dress, 
wherever we go, YES means YES, and NO means NO!" 



Focus 



October 21, 1993 Mainsheet page 7 



Good intentions turn into trouble for American troops in Somalia 

by Michele Queenan 



The chaos in Somalia has been going on for a very 

' long time. It is a very sad story when the most wholesome 

and moral of intentions (such as the Americans desire to feed 

starving Somali people) leads into a nightmare of unforeseen 

consequences. 

America got into Somalia because Americans felt a 
genuine outrage at the thought of thousands of innocent 
people starving while food was being stolen right out from 
under them by warlord Mohammed Farrah Aidid"s hench- 
men. The majority of Americans now want to withdraw from 
Somalia because they feel an outrage with what is happening 
to the American peace keeping troops. 

According to an article by Time magazine reporter 
Lance Morrow, "it is obviously futile to march Americans 
into the midst of long-standing Somali blood feuds. To do so 
creates an explosive dynamic in which the Americans are the 
new villains and targets: more Americans die, more Somali 
civilians die as Americans grow ftiastrated and retaliate with 
bigger gunships, hatreds grow deeper, and the tragedy is 
compounded." 

A poll was taken by Time/CNN of 500 adult Ameri- 



cans in January 1993, and again in October 1993 regarding 
these issues. The same questions were posed in each poll, 
and the results have changed dramatically within nine 
months. In January 79 percent approved of troops in 
Somalia, now only 36 percent approve. Regarding how the 
United States should respond to fighting in Somalia, 37 
percent say remove all troops immediately. 

President Clinton's plan is to send 1 700 more crack 
froops to Somalia, plus 104 Bradley fighting vehicles (per- 
sonnel carriers), and four Cobra attack helicopters. It is 
thought this equipment ought to be able to handle Somali 
warlord Aidid, at least in open combat. 

If the equipment cannot handle the situation an 
additional 3600 Marines will be waiting offshore ready to go 
in. Altogether the available force will about 10,000. This 
does not include another 10,000 men aboard the ships of a 
carrier battle group that will steam around offshore. 

President Clinton has made the pledge to end 
deployment within six months. American froops might have 
to pull out of Somalia before a settlement takes place, and 
if Somalia remains tmsettled, it seems unlikely that other 



froops will stay after the Americans go. 

U.N. Secretary-General BoufrosBoufros-Ghali said 
that France, Belgium, Jordan and Tunisia are already talking 
about pulling out even before the United States does. 

Last December Operation Restore Hope was sup- 
posed to pioneer a new kind of American intervention, one 
for purely humanitarian purposes. The operation was to have 
been a forerunner of a new kind of U.N. intervention, one not 
to monitor peace but to establish peace. 

In the latest battle the casualties stand at 1 6 dead, and 
77 wounded. Helicopter pilot Michael Durant, who was 
being held captive, was released this past week. This number 
exceeds the 15 Americans killed in the previous 10 months 
of the United States involvement in Somalia. 

Americans came to Somalia to feed the hungry; most 
Americans are now asking what happened? 

In the recent Time magazine poll of 500 adult 
Americans, 89 percent want froops brought home as soon as 
possible. Tills percentage agrees with what is being said on 
our campus, with 48 percent of 1 00 students surveyed saying 
send no more troops to Somalia. 



Focus Survey: 

Is the President doing the right thing sending more troops to Somalia? 





Anne Manley 
Criminal Justice 

"No, I supported our froops 
when it was a hiunanitarian 
effort. This has frimed into a 
manhunt and we are paying 
with American lives." 



Ron Fuller 
CIS 

"Yes, we need more people to 
handle the existing problem." 



Terry Gardner 

Sign Language Interpreter 

"No, the President should have 
listened to Powell in the fu'st 
place." 



Nancy Green 

Math/Science 

"Yes, just don't send my 
husband, although he would love 
to go." 



Jim Lavallee 
Liberl Arts 

"No, my brother is going to be 
there, Saudi was enough." 



phatos by Terri Ladd 



Both sides of the issue... 



Let's get the job done 



by Tom Redmond 

Quite simply, yes! If more froops are needed, then send them in. Let's do what we 
have to do to get the job done. Because this job needs to be done. Done right and done quick. 

Please don't mention Vietnam. They were getting along rather splendidly with out us. 
We had no business being there. We have every right to be in Somalia. We were invited. 

I understand the fiiU severity of a soldier's death. I am not immune to the loss of loved 
ones. I also see the ravages of anarchy , famine and disease. There, but for the grace of God, 
go we. For we are not immune from apocalypse. 

The United States is in Somalia as part of a United Nations coalition to stabilize a 
desperate region and expedite crucial humanitarian aid. We are not fighting a war. We are 
fighting a peace and peace will exact a price. But,it is a price we must be willing to pay. 

The post Cold War world is more fraught with danger than at any other time in history 
of man. The United States, as the sole remaining super power, must lead the free world in 
example and deed. 

It is imperative that we have a unilateral foreign policy which recognizes that our 
economic and physical security is not only dependent on waging war but also promoting 
peace. We must be at the vanguard in providing astable and orderly world. If we tuma blind 
eye to the chaos in Somalia it will spread like wild fire. Every tin horn dictator in the worid 
will be licking his chops. We are not just rescuing Somalia; we are saving ourselves 

This is not a partisan issue. A liberal democrat has inherited this situation from a 
conservative republican. Remember how good and righteous Mr. Bush made us feel when 
the froops landed just in time for Christmas. Well now that our gift has been opened let 's 
give our support and show our resolve to President Clinton while he cleans up Mr Bush's 
ribbons and bows. 



Advertise in the MainSheet 

Reach 4000 intelligent, beautiful, big spenders. 



Next deadline: October 28 



Somalia: It's time to go 

by Nancy Brennan 

Yeah, I voted for him, but don't think for a minute that I support him on everything- 
-I'm not that foolish. 

President Clinton needs to stand up and make a decision, based on the United States, 
not the United Nations, regarding oiir involvement in Somalia. 

We seem to be getting into the Vietnamesque pattern of disposable froops— for each 
soldier killed, we send over another to fill in the vacancy. Row after row of soldiers fall, and 
we just keep pushing new ones into place like ducks in a coin-operated target shooting game. 

We missed the mark in Vietnam. We let the disposable froop policy carry on so long, 
that we eventually ran out of the standard issue soldier and had to start picking individuals 
out of their childhoods and throwing them to the lions. Why? Because no one wanted to 
take responsibility for the war they wouldn't even call a war. Pretend it isn't happening and 
it won't hurt. A nation in denial. Are we going to let it happen again? 

At this point, the UN has us in a position where we can neither make a decision to take 
serious action witliin Somalia, or make a firm decision to pull out. UN General Boufros 
Boutros Ghali is like a puppet master-he knows that the US can't pull out or we'll appear 
weak to the rest of the world, and he knows that we can't just go in and "Blast 'em," because 
number one, the people of the US aren't willing to foot the bill and sacrifice their men and 
women, and number two, the US doesn't have any financial or political stake in seeing 
Somalia at peace. 

We're involved in a situation over which we have no confrol, and yet it is our people 
and our resources vhlch are being used. We are taking sides in a civil war, which has proven 
time and time again throughout our history, to be neither of benefit to us, or to those we are 
trying to help. Vietnam. Korea. Failures. 

My father had this expression he liked to use, "Hey, s — or get off the pot." Maybe 
Clinton needs to hear that. We can't be sending in trickles of soldiers to combat a civil war 
that encompasses an entire nation of people. Our troops are the ultimate sacrifice— little 
lambs sent to slaughter so that the US and its reputation aren't marred. We need to see the 
members of our military as liuman beings— then perhaps our leaders won't be so willing to 
commit thejn to situations where the likelihood of death Is very real, accepted as a price for 
our Involvement in the affairs of the world. Let's go in there like we mean It, with real 
weapons and serious intentions, or let 's get out now before any more of oiu" lambs are brought 
to slaughter in the streets of Somalia. 



page 8 Mainsheet October 21, 1993 



Back Page 



What's Happening? 



Stage: 

Zeiterion Theater 

Tickets for the following 
shows may be purchased 
at all TICKETMASTER 
locations or by calling 1- 
931-2000. Seniors/ 
students $3.00 discount, 
group rates available. 

THE BOY WHO 

WANTED TO TALK TO 

WHALES (Beyond 

Adventure Series) 

Sunday, October 24, 2.00 

p.m. 

Tickets are $7.50 general 

admission 

For more info call Donna 

Fisher-Jackson (508) 997- 

5664 

CHARLOTTE'S WEB 

(schooltime show) 
Wednesday, October 27, 
10:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. 
Thursday, October 28, 
9:30 am. & 12:30 p.m. 
Tickets are $4.00 for a.m. 
show & $3.50 p.m. show 
For more info call (508) 
994-2900 

DIE FLEDERMAUS 

(Opera) 

Monday, November 1 , 

8:00 p.m. 

areS21.00, $25.00, & 

$29,00 

''9°54-2°^§(J"^°*'^'^^°^^ 



YOUNG ABE LINCOLN 

Tuesday, November 2, 
10:00 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. 
Tickets are $4,00 for a.m. 
show & $3.50 p.m. show 
For more info call (508) 
994-2900 

Music and Arts: 

Halloween Haunted House 

A joiot effort of Big 
Brothers/Big Sisters of 
Cape Cod with th 
Barnstable High School 
Drama Club. 
Oct 22-3 1 in the former 
Woolworth location at the 
C^e Cod Mall. All tickets 
priced at $4 

Brown Bag Events 

This year's theme: 

Multicultural ism 

Weds, at noon & Thurs. at 

12:30 

Tilden Arts Center lobby 

Seminars & 
Workshops: 

Alcohol Abuse Among the 

Elderly 

Oct. 28 from 4 to 6 p.m. in 

C-106 

sponsored by CCCC's 

Center for Successfijl Aging 

$5,515 for RN's wisliiii to 

earn C.E.U.s 



More info call, Carla Priest 
at 362-2131, ext. 386 

Jazzercise for the Mass.- 
Breast Cancer Coalition 

Oct. 23, 9:30 a.m. at the 

Jazzercise Fitness Center, 

386 Main Street, Hyannis 

Suggested minimum 

donation to participate 

$10.00 

Babysitting available 

For more info call 790-1981 

Awakening the Sacred 
Feminine 

6 week experimental class 
for women who want 
support in bringing forth 
the wild woman and 
honoring the goddess 
within. 

Fridays begiiming Oct. 
22nd, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 
sliding scale fee 
For info call Cunjan 
Laborde 563-7575 or 
JoEllen Rice 362-8968 

Talk for Nurse/Home 
Health Aides on 
Protection from 
Combative Behavior 

Oct. 28 from 3:44 to 5:44 
p.m. in the Tilden Arts 
Center 

Advance registration 
requested. Fee is S 10, 
C.E.U's provided 
MBTl TYPE Workshops 
Fall -93 



For more info call 362- 
2131, ext. 452 
Introductory 
workshops: 

Oct. 19 & 21, 2:00 -3:00 
p.m. L102 

Oct. 25, 27, & 29, 12:00 - 
1:00 p.m, L102 
Nov. 8, 10, & 12, 12:00- 
1:00 p.m. L102 
Nov, 30, & Dec. 2, 9:30 - 
11:00 a,m, L102 

Issues Workshops: (for 

participants w*o have taken 

MBTI) 

October 26, 2:00 -3:00 

p.m. L102 Type and 

Personality 

November 8, 3:00 - 4:00 

p.m. LI 02 Type and 

Couples 

November 16,9:30- 10:30 

a.m. L102 Type and 

Learning 

December 8, 2:00 - 3:00 

p.m. LI 02 Type and 

Careers 

Dealing >vith stress 
workshop 

weekly meeting, Wtd & 
Thurs. 3:15 to 4: 15 
CCCC upper commons 
Classes are free and open to 
all students 

Sponsored by the Adult 
Reentry Center 

To participate in a 
workshop, sign up at the 



Counseling Center, 
Administration Building. 
All sessions are held in the 
Library/Learning Resources 
Center-Conference Room 
(L102). 

Contests: 

National College Poetry 
Contest 

Open to all college & 
university students desiring 
to have their poetry 
anthologized. Cash prizes 
will be awarded to the top 

5 poems. Deadline is 
October 31. Contest rules 
available at the MainSheet 
office. 

The National Library of 
Poetry Contest 

To enter send one original 
poem, any subject or style 
to The National Library of 
Poetry, 1 1419 Cronridge 
Dr., P.O.Box 704-ZI, 
Owings Mills, MD 21 117, 
Entries should be 
postmarked by September 
30. New contest opens 
October 1,1993. 

Intramural Sports 

6 Activities: 

Bodw'orks class 
Low impact aerobics, 
step,cardiovascular 
conditioning, gutbusters 



and toning, stretching 
and relaxation, 
nutrition information. 
Mon - Wed - Fri, 1 1 to 
12 P.M. in the 
Gymnasium 

Basketball Tues,& 
Thurs, 11-4 
Volleyball Mon. & 
Fri. 2-4 

Indoor Soccer Wed. 
& Fri. 12-2 
Floor Hockey Mon. 
& Fri. 2^ 

All sign-up sheets for 
intennural sports are 
posted in the Life 
Fitness Center. 

CCCC Fall Blood 

Drive 

sponsored by your 

Student Senate 

Wed, Oct. 27 from 10 

a,ra, to 3 p,m. in the 

gym 

Please sign up in the 

cafeteria the week of 

Oct, 18th to donate the 

gift of life! 

Your activity or eventwil 
be published in the 
MainSheets What's 
Happening on a space 
available basis. Please 
send submissions to the 
MainSheet in the care 
of Cindy Steinmueller 



132 VARIETY & DELI 



Special Sub Mon - Fri for only $1.32 

AVOID THE WAIT AND CALL AHEAP 362-3311 

Koaet3eef... 2.95 A-.Ob Turkey.,, 2.95 4.05 

Italian... 2.65 3.65 FaetramL , , 2,65 3.65 

Salami & Cheeee. . . 2.55 3.46 Meatball. . . 2.55 3.55 

Ham or 3olo0na & Cheeee. . . 2.45 3.35 

Chicken Salad,,, 2.95 3.95 

Seafood Salad, . : 3.05 4,05 Tuna Salad, , , 2.65 3.65 

Included are: lettuce, tomato, picklee, onions, 

hot peppers, mayonnaise & mustard 

Hot Do0e. . . 1.25 Clam Chowder. , . 1,50 

hAeate & Salade Available by the Foundl 

fresh Froduce, Beach Supplies, Cigarettes, Lottery Tickets, 

Maps, Film, Batteries, Sundries, Beverages, Ice and morel 

Coffee • Donuts • Full line of Bakery Froducts 

Rte. 132, Hyannis- Across from the Hampton Inn 

(1/2 mi. south of route 6) 



Student Profile: MTV's Beavis and Butt-Head 




Name: Beavis and Butt-Head 

Age: 15 

Hometown: MTV 

Course of Study: Fire Prevention and 
Developmental Classes 



What do you like best about CCCC? 
Chemistry Lab 

What do you like least about CCCC? 
There's no Frog Baseball 

Who has been your most influential 

advisor? 

Michael Cuff Financial Aid Director 



What do you see your self doing in 5 

years? 

Attending CCCC, Yeah, Huh, Huh, 

Huh 

What books would you recommend? 
Beavis: Words Suck 
Butt-Head: Yeah. If I wanted to read, 
I'd go to school. 

What is your pet peeve? 

People who fart so loud you can't hear 

the TV 

How do you spend your free time? 
Wrestling at Babes Are Us. 

What message would you send to an 

alien nation? 

What color is your butt? Huh-huh, 

huh-huh. 

What message would you send to the 

President? 

How big are Hilary's hooters, dude? 



CCCC Football : The Seamen return! 



by Brian Ford 

Postseason bowl game hopes returned to the hearts of the 
CCCC Varsity Football squad last Saturday as the Cape 
Cod Community College Seamen edged out the mighty 
Beavers of Wanker State University by a score of 69-67. If 
was the first victory in 44 years for the Seamen at WSU 's 
Beaverhead Stadium, and the win also put CCCC into 
contention for a berth in a New Years day bowl game. 

The Beavers got off to a quick start as they opened the 
gamewitha 1 ISyardkickoffretum. However, the referees 
called back the touchdown once they discovered that 
Seamen kicker Dick Hertz kicked the ball into the bleach- 
ers behind the end zone, only to be recovered by a drunken 
WSU fan who streaked the field for a Beaver TD. The 
inebriated fan was iinmediately caught and executed as 
play resumed. 

With Wanker State ahead 24-6 midway through the 
second quarter, our Seamen began to play hard. Capitaliz- 
ing on an interception made by senior defensive end Harry 
P. Ness, quarterback and Heisman hopeful Woody Phallus 
thrusted his Seamen through the Beavers' loose defense 
and came into the end zone to score yet again. 



Toj) lo best things 
at CCCC 

1 . The Greasy Spoon 

I. Helpfiil advisors 

3. Naked bungi jumpin, on Saturdays 

\. The friendly bookstore staff 

5. A grandparent in every class 

6. The smoking room 

7. The wide variety of parking 

8. Facsinating Telecourses 

9. Conference Champion sports teams 

10. The LameSheet 



The Seamen were thrashing Beavers left and right, but 
when the Wanker St. defense really began to pour it on. 
Phallus, trembling, felt too much pressure and his arm fell 
limp. He then errantly hit an open Beaver who returned the 
interception, only to drop a spike in the end zone. 

Immediately following the play, WSU's Russian ex- 
change student, linebacker Vladimir Nonoxynolnine, layed 
a blatant hit on Phallus and shattered his fiinny bone. 
Phallus, laughing hysterically was carted off the field and 
taken to the clubhouse where he would have his arm 
amputated. Nonoxynohiine, the biggest Seamen killer of 
them all, was ejected fi-om the game. Phallus was then 
replaced by Mexican passing ace Pedro Grande, who is 
sunply dubbed "El Paso." 

Grande went on to throw six touchdowns for 467 yards in 
the remaining 30 minutes of play. Seamen coach Chester 
Manson was thrilled with his team. "These guys really 
played their balls off I tell ya, they won't be feeling blue 
tonight. I'm just really glad we went out there and gave 
those Beavers a lickui'." 

Following the game, the CCCC campus was engaged in 
wild celebration. The school's largest fraternity, the Mega 
Masta Betas, threw the biggest victory bash on record. 
With hopes of playing in a postseason bowl game on 
January. 1 , one could only imagine the ijnmense support 
these wild students will give. These kids really back their 
Seamen. 

Manson hopes to lead his Seamen to the prestigious 
Toilet Bowl this year and if they keep playing the way they 
did on Saturday, he won't be disappointed. University by 
a score of 69-67. It was the fnst victory in 44 years for the 
Seamen at WSU's Beaverhead Stadium, and the win also 
put CCCC into contention for a berth in a New Years day 
bowl game. 



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want to do? 

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by Brian Ford 

Violence erupted on the CCCC campus last week as 
smokers and non-smokers clashed outside the North Build- 
ing, leaving a wake of terror and destruction. Apparently the 
violence was touched off when a student tried to cut through 
a mob of smokers at the entrance of the building and was 
subdued by a faceful of second-hand smoke. The student, an 
unidentified non-smoker, responded to the assault by shout- 
ing, "Hey hog-puffer, watch where you blow your damn 
smoke!" Upon hearing this, the horde of smokers grew 
hostile and began to mash out their butts all over the angry 
student's body. The smokers, feeling victorious, paraded his 
charred remains around for all to see, and hung him upside- 
down on a tree in the center of campus. 

CCCC's non-smokers launched a cotmter-attack almost 
instantly. Armed with rocks, cafeteria hamburgers, and 
Molotov cocktails, the non-smokers rushed their opposition 
with devastating power. Large concrete ashtrays were set in 
ruin, anti-smoking propaganda, such as those stupid little 
signs that say "Please help make this a smoke-free campus," 
were strewn all over. Snipers in trees aimed with high- 
powered Super-Soakers picked off matches and lighters as 
they lit cigarettes. Looting and pillaging raged throughout 
campus. CCCC was in a state of anarchy. 

Faculty members and students alike joined in on the 
rioting. CCCC accounting god Roger Cole was reportedly 
seen, with cigar in mouth, kicking the snot out of a yoimg 
Hotel/Restaurant major who didn't smoke. Cole was also 
heard saying, "I haven't kicked this much ass since the cops 



tried to break up a Hemp Rally I was at back in '67!" Tlie 
LameSheet also caught up with resident sociologist Leo 
Lortie in the campus bookstore as he was stuffing handfuls 
of candy and CCCC shotglasses Into his coat pockets. Lortie 
explained "deviant behavior and the need for the smokers in 



"...the need for the smokers to 
freely express their passionate de- 
sire for lung cancer is primarily 
what led to the complete break- 
down of this college society..." 



this school to freely express their passionate desire for limg 
cancer is primarily what led to the complete breakdown of 
this college society. By the way, you wouldn't happen to 
have any rolling papers on you, would ya, pal?" Also, 
Professor Bill Babner was arrested, as he was caught in the 
prop room of the Arts Center trying on women's clothing. 
College President Richard A. Kraus called in Barnstable 
Police, Mass. State Police, and the National Guard to help 
restore order. Riot squads equipped with tear gas and canine 
units were activated. An arinored car was also sununoned by 



Kraus's office to go to the gas station for a butt-run. A state 
of emergency was then declared by Governor Weld. 

Angry protesters from the non-smokers side picketed and 
held signs that said "We Want Your Butts!," and "The 
Marlboro Man is a Fag!" One student was seen getting 
pimmtelled by rioters from both sides. Apparently, when 
asked if he smoked, he replied, "Only when I'm drunk." 

The smokers blamed the entire ordeal on the non-smok- 
ers, saying that they're tired of being labeled as orally- 
fixated idiots with bad breath and yellow fingernails. "Hey," 
one smoker argued, "if you're disgusted by brown teeth, you 
don't have to look at me. It's a free country." "We're not 
about to stand for the oppression my people have endured for 
so many semesters," shouted one nicotine-high puffer. "We're 
faced with this kind of crap every day, and we're not going 
to take it any more!," yelled another. "Hey, anyone got a 
light? Which one of you sons-a-bitches stole my matches?!," 
wailed another. 

Order was restored finally when the smokers retreated in 
mass numbers. They had run clean out of cigs. In a press 
conference held by the college administration and faculty at 
the Burger King conference room. President Kraus repotted 
that the castjalties are high and tuition rates vnll increase 
again. Following a long drag of his pipe, Kraus said "Though 
bothsides...(cough)....may claim victory,. ...(hack). ...no one 
has won this battle. We're all losers here. Every one of us." 
Since no students were present, it was assumed he was 
talking about the faculty. 



Near miss with Great White: 

Professor and wife nearly devoured 
while boating off Hyannisport 

by Staff Writers 



During a recent sailing jaunt along coastal waters, 
on Bill's sailboat, a very unlikely visitor arrived in the water 
just off the port side, 

A huge shark which looked similar to Jaws 
interurpted Professor Babner and Mrs. ProfessorBabner dur- 
ing their romantic cruise. 

The shark nawed two huge holes in the sloop. The 
Great WTiite then jumped over the boat in the same manner 
Willy does in Free Willy. Experts say that the shark was the 
biggest they had ever seen. The professors barely escaped 
the sharkny "firing flares into the eyesof the evil shark," Mrs. 
Professor said. 

Other reports were made about similar attacks in 
Japan and Hawaii. Marine Biologist, Algea R. Chloroplas, 
concluded that God had sent the sharks to "devour those who 
had deeply sinned." Mr. Chloroplast went on to say he 
believes this because thee was no other possible explaination. 

Scientists have warned that all people who feel that 
they have not repented for their sins should not enter the 
water. 




Professor Bill Babner before his encounter 
with the Great White 



News Briefs 



Vomiting Contest Scheduled 

The school will be sponsoring a vomiting contest 
in the cafeteria this Friday. Contestants will be judged 
on grunt noise, delivery, color of vomit, posture, and 
content. The Winner will receive the coveted Golden 
Toilet Trophy and a one year cafeteria pass, aUovidng 
him all the free food he can chew and spew. Only 
Greasy Spoon food will be allowed. Bulimics need not 
apply. 



Psychology Dept. will Study Idiots 

If you are an idiot, the Psychology Dept. needs 
you. Tliey will be performing a study on stupid people 
and their effects on themselves and the rest of the world. 
If you think you are dumb enough to decrease the 
school ' s average IQ by at least 1 points, please contact 
the Psychology Dept. ifyouknowhowto use the phone. 



Daily Horoscopes 



by Jeanine Dickson 

Aries (March 21-19) Certain ramifications wall 
prohibit you from excelling today, watch out for the horns. 

Taurus (April 20-May 20) The Moon is passing 
Uranus, don't reveal any dark secrets today. 

Gemini (IMay 21-June 22) Double trouble today, 
problems during the day, problems at night, just stay in 
bed. 

Cancer (June 22- July 22) Crabby attitudes may 
ruin your day but you'll claw your way through. 

Leo (July 23- Aug.22) It's ajungle out there, trouble 
in the aftemooc. but the evening ends with a roar. 

Virgo (Aug.23- Sept.22) Lucky in love today but 
you're not supposed to be. 

Libra (Sept.23- Oct.23) Emotions weigh heavy, 
will balance out this evening. 

Scorpio (Oct.24- Nov.21) Watch your pointed and 
sharp nature it may turn to sting you. 

Sagittarius (Nov.22- Dec.21) Beware how you let 
the arrow fly, for what you send out comes back to you. 

Capricorn (Dec.22- Jan 19) What else can be said, 
Jesus was a Capricorn. 

Aquarius (Jan.20- Feb.18) Although your a water 
sign, let the sun shine in. 

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Your a fish out of water 
today, don't go to work today, stay home and play. 



Student Senate is Sponsoring a 



J-faCCoween QUouC 

Costume Contest 

Coca-Cola give away 

Cash Prizes and Music 

Friday October 29 in the Cafeteria 
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m 




Clubs will be exhibiting their wares 

Trick or freat candy for gouls and goblin 
who dress the part. 




fs^^ Your 

HAU^fTWG 

You? 

TyPC-(T! CAN S!A3CE_Y0U! 
Now THROUGH 

Hauow^en 
$1.25 Bastc TYPmc 

(Per Pace With This AP Oniy) 

Just CAl,t ^20-%^7Q9> 

Ask about 

Resume & 

DeskTop Publishing 

Some restricrions apply. 

Not valid ^-idi otlier 

Type-IT! offfirs. 

Typc-IT!, ihcTypc-IT! t^go 
ai<; Trndfjiiarks of TvtjoIT! 




THT.<s AD IS r.F.NT ITNF 



Should the president tax alcohol 
lor health reform? 



MainSheet poll 




Liz Walker at the 
Independence 
House 

Page 1 1 



The Dance of Life 



Pages 




Spring Schedule 
inside ##4 




)IN SHEET 



November 4, 1993 



Volume XIVI 



Cape Cod Community College West Barnstable, MA 



Distributed FREE 



Committee meeting addresses ethnic and racial concerns 



by STAFF WRITERS 



An emergency meeting was called by the Affirmative Action Committee in 
response to the recently published Viewpoiat, entitled "Through ill gotten gains," by Tom 
Redmond whicli appeared in the October 21st edition of the MainSheet. The meeting was 
held in order to fmd ways of increasing sensitivity towards ethnic and racial groups and issues 
on campus. 

Tlie Viewpoint stated that Native American gambling casinos were a special 
privilege, and that special privileges should not be given to one specific group of people and 
not another. 

Tlie federal government claims40 percent of the profits brought in lirom the casinos, 
the state takes their share, then the remaining money goes to the Native Americans, 
according to Nancy Black, president of the Native American club here on campus. 

Several people on campus were offended by the Viewpoint and turned to Augustine 
Dorado, Assistant Dean of Community Services vidth their concerns. 

As Chainnan of the Affirmative Action Committee, Dean Dorado called the 
meeting for the sole purpose of addressing those concerns. "It is my responsibility as an 
Affirmative Action officer to follow up on these concerns." 

"When I picked up the paper and read it, I was hurt by it," said Ms. Black. She said 
she wanted to address the situation, but had no desire to begin a "battle." 

The connnittee agreed the situation was a learning experience for all concerned. 
"We should continue to pursue education, regardless of what brings it forth," said Dean 
Dorado. 

"Diversity and ethnicity are a part of everyday life," said Gus Mills, committee 
member and academic counselor. "There is a need for students to become more aware." 

The committee talked about introducing a"Sensitivity" day on campus, as a means 
of expanding ethnic and racial awareness." 

"We need to start somewhere, we need to start now," said Ms. Black. 

"Maybe it is timely that this happened, " said Dean Dorado "we should start 
establishing some forums to educate ourselves more." 

Everyoue present agreed that the answer to resolving differences is education. One 
suggestion was to enroll in the course entitled "Race, Class, and Culture in the U.S." which 
will be offered during the spring semester. 




plmto bf Bnrm Russell 

Nancy Black voices her views about ethnic awareness on 
campus at the Affirmative Action Meeting. 



Congratulations Billy! 




First Place in the Halloween contest 
was given to Billy Lewos at Club 
Day. 

See page 2 for more on dub day 



State of the Cape Conference to 
address environmental issues 



by DARIENE MOKRYCKI 

Copy Editor 



A Conference which will have a major impact to the 
environmental fiiture of the Cape will be held at CCCC this 
weekend. 



'The Cape needs the participa- 
tion of its young people in chart- 
ing its future' 



This conference, spon- 
sored by the Association for 
the Preservation of Cape 
Cod (APCC) and entitled 
STATE OF THE CAPE will 
be hosted by the college this 
Friday and Saturday No- ' 

vember 5-6. 

Among the highlights of the conference will be addresses 
by environmental experts George R. Woodwell of the Woods 
Hole Research Center; Peter Ryner, past director of plarming 
for Barnstable; Abby Rockefeller, founder and president of 
the Clivus Multrum Company; John Peters, grand sachem of 
the Wampanoag Tribe; and Edward McMahon of the Ameri- 
can Greenways Program. 

Topics for the conference will include Groundwater and 
Marine waters; Plant and animal habitats; Envirorunental 
economic development; Transportation and growth manage- 
ment; Wampanoag perspective; Wetlands; and Saving wa- 
ter, heat, gasoline and electricity. 
On Friday, the keynote speaker. Congressman Gerry Studds, 
will address a gathering of 300 environmentalists firom the 



Cape and other areas of Massachusetts. Also featured on 
Friday will be addresses entitled "The Biological Commu- 
nity," "The Global Connection,"and "Cape Cod: The final 
Chapter." 
Saturday's program wiU include sessions dealing with a 

variety of environmental is- 

"~"~~"~"'^^^^~^^^^~" sues important to Cape 
Codders, including the status 
of the Cape's various natural 
resources, how well Cape citi- 
zens are doing the job of pro- 
^^^^^^_^^^,^^^^ tecting them, and what can be 
done to safeguard them more 
effectively. 
One of the major goals of the conference will be develop- 
ment of an advocacy agenda and political support for priority 
measures based on the conclusions of conference attenders. 
Because the Cape needs the participation of its young 
people in charting its fiiture, arrangements for a special 
registration discount has been made for CCCC students. The 
studentrate is $15. The college will subsidize student fees 
for up to 30 students, in the amount of $10.00, so that final 
cost will be $5.00. 

Included with the entrance fee will be a copy of 
APCC's report State of The Cape 1994. a 300 page report 
dealing with environmental issues pertinent to the Cape. 

Editor's note: A review of the State of the Cape 1994 
Report is on page 12 of this issue of the of the MainSheet. 



page 2 Mainsheet Wovember 4. 1993 



Campuis News 




iilPUAIICV 

Ski Club promotes Waterville trip 



Mvtii if' Mfeteto Qm00mm 



Zeter to editor: 

Dean praises costume party 

The success of the recent Club Day/Costume Party 
sponsored by the Student Senate deserves comment. The 
enthusiasm and energy generated by the event persisted 
throughout the day; it was great ftin! 

Thanks to all involved, especially Dave Marhefka 
and Deb Currier. 

Richard G. Rand, Associate Dean 




Goblins big and small romp at party. 



Help is out there, if you know where to look 



by SARAH CURLEY 

Staff Writer 



There are many places on campus where students can 
get assistance with their studies. One such place is the 
office of Academic Support Services. This office is 
committed to student success. They offer many free services 
which are designed to help students reach their goals and fiill 
potential. Typical of these services is the Peer Tutorial 
prognxi, an increasingly popular avenue of collaborative 
learning. 

At the Academic Development Center (ADC), located 
in South 111, personalized tutoring is offered in many 
subjects. Peer tutors decide what they want lo tutor, they 
must also have maintained good grades in the subjects they 
wish to tutor and have a faculty recommendation. 

Peer tutors earn free college credits while helping others 
succeed. The prospective peer tutor must first take a course. 
Peer Tutorial and Practicum (ET 200 or MT 200). Reading, 
discussions and instructional videos are methods used to 
familiarize students with the tutoring process. Tutors are 
expected to write a paper at the end of the semester about 
their experience. There are six hours of training and, 
depending on how many hours are spent tutoring, a maxi- 
mum of three credits can be obtained. 

Another fecility which aids students is the Math 
Lab located in Science 112. The lab is supervised by math 



faculty, and peer tutors, who welcome you to study in 
groups or do homework. Someone is always present vsiio 
can answer questions. If you're having trouble with a 
specific problem Drop-in tutoring is available for any 
questions you might have. 

The Math Lab offers a quiet atmosphere for studying 
andprovideswhateveradditionalhelp which maybe needed. 

Keidi Ferreira, a peer tutor in English, says that she 
finds tutoring rewarding. The time she spends helping 
others gives her more familiarity with the subject. 

"Tutoring also helps me develop patience that I can 
s^ply to my own study habits and life situations," she said. 

Polly Babner, coordinator for the peer tutorial program, 
says that tutoring is excellent practice for students who are 
considering a career in education. '' 

This semester there are peer tutors for English, Psy- 
chology, Sociology, History, Economics, Spanish, Ger- 
man, Marketing, Business Math, Chemistry, Physics, Sta- 
tistics, Computer Science, and all levels of Math. 

Stop in at the ADC or call ext. 352 to make an 
appointment with a peer tutor. The hours are Monday 
through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.; Friff ay, 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 pjn. 

To obtain more information on how to become a peer 
tutor, 

contact Verlyne Eaimiello at the ADC or Polly Babner ?t 
ext. 467. 



Bill and Tom's excellent employment adventure 



by JENNIFER DIXON 

Staff Writer 



Looking for a job? Are you sick of being an 
imemployment statistic? Well students, you may be cured. 
Go and see Tom or Bill in the Student Employment Office. 

This on campus job placement aids students in 
finding numerous jobs in a variety of fields for off campus 
jobs. 

Tom Killoran and Bill Archambault are the direc- 
tors of Student Employment Office, and their more than 
friendly services enable students to find part-time or summer 
jobs. The Student Employment Office is located on the 
second floor of the Conunons Building, next to the Financial 
Aid office. 

There are a great variety of jobs to choose from: 
secretarial work, retail sales, hotels and restaurants, health 
technology, baby-sitting, and billing specialists are to just 
name a few. If your interests range anywhere from helping 
the mentally handicapped to waiting on tables, or delivering 
packages, and you're in need of a job, then you can benefit 
from the Student Employment program. 

The salaries also vary depending on the job you 



choose. Some of the jobs pay S2.55 an hour, like that of a 
waitperson, or, you could earn the minimum wage of $4.25 
as a sales cleik. Some restaurants and a fixed salary of 
anywhere from $5 to $7 an hour, which averages in the tips 
you would make. At the same time you could earn up to $9 
an hour as a UPS (United Parcel Service) delivery person, 
certain requirements are specified by the employer. 

The job opportunities never stop changing at the 
Student Employment office. New jobs come up weekly. 
Some of the more interestmg jobs in the past have included 
a magicians' assistant and fishing companies looking for 
deck hands to clean boats. There may be the perfect job just 
waiting for you. 

The procedure is easy: 

1. Go to the Student Employment Office 

2. Fill out a registration form. 

3. Set up an appointment with the employer for 
an interview. 

4. Go to the interview. 

It'sthateasy. From there, you're on your own. Bill 
and Tom will be more than willing to assist you in looking for 
the job, but just like the job itself, first you've got to show up! 



News Briefs 



Microsoft Windows Course 

A Microsoft Windows computer course wiU 
be offered at CCCC Hyannis campus on Monday 
evenings from Nov 15th to Dec 6th. The course is 
limited to a minimum of six students and a maximum 
of fifteen students. The cost for the 12 hour instruction 
is $89.00. 

To register or receive more information, call 
778-2221 weekdays. CCCC's Hyannis campus is lo- 
cated at 540 Main stteet in the factory outlet complex 
between Main and North streets. 

Winter Mask Workshop 

The Adult Re-entry Center is sponsoring a 
winter mask workshop to be held on Monday, Dec.6th 
and Tues, Dec.7th in the cafeteria from 10:00 am to 
3:00 pm. Students, faculty, and friends of the 
college are invited to make a plaster gaiize mask of 
themselves. The fee is three dollars with all proceeds 
going to the Adult Re-Entry Crisis Fund. 

UMass/Boston Orientation/MBAPrograms 

UMass/Boston has scheduled an orientation 
seession at Cape Cod Community College for its local 
MBA degree program. The session will be held 
Saturday,Nov,13th from 9am to noon inroomGll of 
the Student Commons. For more information, call 
Augustin Dorado at 362- 2131, ext 381. 

Nurse Aide/Home Health Aide Grads 

A group of twenty students have graduated 
from the 156 hour tri-level nurse aide/ home health 
aide course at CCCC. They are John Edward Boucher, 
Jr. of South Yarmouth, Lois A. DiLorenzo of Center- 
ville, Karen Gallant of Hyannis, Guillermo Gonzales 
of Centerville, Jean Kenneally of South Yarmouth, 
Barbara Kirk of South Wellfleet, Linda Kirsch of East 
Falmouth, Lisa LaTulipe of Chatham, Lorraine Logan 
of West Yarmouth, Barbara McCabe of Buzzards Bay. 
Also, Thomas Scott McLeod of Mashpee, Mickey 
Moreland of Plymouth, WiUiam F. O'Connor of Den- 
nisport, Anne Peterson of Sandwich, Gail Remhagen 
of East Sandwich, Jill Serafini of Forestdale, Susan 
Silvia of Hatchville, Diana Sundeen of West Barnsta- 
ble, Sandra Taubert of Dennisport, PriscillaM. Tom- 
Unson of North Eastham. 

Mass-Ukraine Citizens requests food 

In an effort to help Ukraine citizens, commu- 
nity members are being asked to donate food. Non- 
perishable foods must be placed in a reinforced card- 
board box and sent to Community Workshops, Inc. 1 74 
Portland St. Boston, MA 021 14 Attn: Bridging Fami- 
lies. You are encouraged to send letters and photos of 
your femily to share with the Ukrainians. There is also 
a box for donations located on the counter at the 
registration desk in the administration building. 

Study program offered 

Cape Cod CMnmimityCoUege'sAdultLeam- 
ing Center invites you to join the free Adult Basic 
Education study program for adults needing improve- 
ment in reading, writing, math or English skills. 
Income-eligible adults can start now, studying toward 
a brighter more prosperous future thanks to grants 
from JTEC (pronounced Jay-tek) and Regional Em- 
ployment Board. Visitthe Adult Learning Center, 540 
Main St., Hyannis or phone 778-2221 daily between 8 
a.m. and 2 p.m. That's 778-2221. 

Student theater pass available 

The American Repertory Theater, located in 
Harvard Square, Cambridge, begins its regular season 
on November 26, and continues through June 1 2, 1 994. 
Shows will be "Henry IV" parts 1 & 2, "What the Butler 
Saw," "The Cherry Orchard A Touch Of the Poet" and 
"Schlemiel the First." Also, for $50 and your student 
ID, you may buy a student pass. The pass is good for 
five tickets and you may use them with a non-student. 
Regular tickets run anywhere from $20-$40 per ticket. 
Fortickets and general information call 617-547-8300. 



Campus News 



Mainsheet November 4, 1993 page 3 



A tribute to Nursing Professor Paula A. Hibbett 



by TERRI LADD 

Staff Writer 



Professor Paula A. Hibbett, 57, a teacher in the 
nursing program at the CCCC recently died of cancer. Ms. 
Hibbett, a graduate of Sacred Heart High School in Boston, 
earned her bachelor of science and master's degree in nursing 
at Boston College. She had a distinguished career as a nurse 
and also as a teacher at the Peter Bent Brigham School of 
Nursing. After retiring as faculty coordinator from there in 
1985, Ms. Hibbett joined the staff of CCCC in 1987. 

Professor Hibbett impacted the lives of many stu- 
dents and faculty in a dynamic and energetic way. As part of 
the nursing faculty at CCCC she gave portions of her life to 
her students and colleagues that will live on forever. 

"Paula Hibbett was an earthy and elegant woman. 
As a nursing instructor she transformed difficult technical 
concepts into understandable lectures. I won't forget the 
huinan characters she created as examples of each medical 
condition she presented. Memories of Paula make me proud 
to be a nurse." 

Leslie Eugenia (graduated May 1993) 

"For me, Paula will be remembered as a woman of 
faith. Her quiet courage, steadfast confidence and trust in 
God throughout her personal ordeal spoke volumes in de- 
scribing the woman she was. Paula has written the most 
fitting tribute to herself ... her unselfish, caring and faith- 
filled life. She will continue to be an example for me. I am 
thankful for her fiiendship." 

Kathleen Kirk (nursing secretary) 

"Ms. Hibbett was one of our best instructors. She 
laced difficult subjects with succinct informarton, humor, 
and a distinct voice that at times would have me pulling my 
hair out. She was always ready to go over concepts not 
understood and as my advisor to answer questions, give 
advice and encourage. Her death is a profound loss for all of 
us but especially a loss for the students that will not have the 
pleasure of knowing her and of being taught by this excep- 
tional educator. We will all miss her." 

George Libone (graduated June 1993) 



"Paula Hibbett was one of the most focused teach- 
ers that 1 have ever had in both the clinical and classroom 
arenas. She had a passion for her work as well as her 
students. She loved us as a group as well as individually. 
She forced us to strive for perfection in all that we did. We 
all love her as a friend and mentor." 

Mark Cloutier (graduated June 1993) 



1 




' 


p 






M 





Paula Hibbett and her husband Larry. 

"Last week CCCC suffered a great loss. Paula 
Hibbett took with her Harry Hiatal Hernia, Peter Peptic 
Ulcer, Carol Cholelithiasis, Paul Pancreatitis, and other 
characters. The class of 1 993 was fortunate to have spent the 
last year with Ms. Hibbett and these characters which 
allowed her to describe difficult concepts with certain ease. 
Her hallmark, however, will be that of a true teacher, she 
consistently emphasized the one quality which defines a 
teacher over an educator. With a heavy Boston accent, she 
would demand that we put down our pens and 'Think! . ' She 
insisted that we take the foundation of infonnation we had 
acquired and use it to solve real problems. To make us 
transfonn information into knowledge was her goal. The 
difference between a teacher and an educator is spirit. Ms. 



Hibbett gave us all of hers." 

Loek J. Atema (graduated June 1993) 
"Paula Hibbett was a quiet, pleasant, spiritual 
woman. Last January it was very quiet around here and 
I had a decision to make. Paula was in her office and we 
talked about it a little bit. She was such a good listener. 
Two days later I came in to find a small wrapped package 
on my desk. Inside was a beautiful little figure of a baby 
angel ... and a note from her. I was touched by her 
thoughtfulness." 

Rosemary Dillon (nursing faculty) 

"...Paula Hibbett did not agree to do a job or task 
unless she could do it well. She was and effective and 
competent professor, both in the classroom and in the 
clinical area. It is not an exaggeration to say that her 
students adored her. She met her teaching and faculty 
responsibilities with professionalism, vvith class and 
with a sense of humor. A quiet and private person by 
nature, she was a woman of few words, but when she did 
have something to say, we all listened." 

Luise Speakman (nursing administrator) 

"Ms. Hibbett was an action oriented, warm, caring 
friend and professional colleague. She got things done. 
She was a confident dedicated individual that loved 
nursing and the nursing students at CCCC. She was 
dedicated to the success of her students. She demanded 
excellence from each student as well as from her peer 
faculty because of her own high standards..." 
Mitzi Anderson (nursing faculty) 

"... Paula Hibbett ' s teaching clarified many things 
for me, too. As I observed her teach, I watched difficult 
concepts click into place. I watched students reason 
through 'if-then' questions, encouraged by comments 
such as 'Think* and 'You know this' and 'You can do 
this.' I was watching a master teacher. 

Ms. Hibbett became my friend, but from the 
beginning of our professional association, she was a 
mentor and a role model to me as much as to the students 
she inspired." 

Susan Maddigan (nursing faculty) 



Professor shares research with Japanese 



by MICHELE AUCLAIR 

Staff Writer 



"~"^^^^^^^~~^"^ Okinawa may need to investigate," he said. 

Dr. Feigenbaum said that he and others "gained 

evidence that highly elevated cancer rates have been 

T J .. L . .... T • _• i .u u-i causedbyahistoryofmilitarypoUution." Hesupportsthis 

In order to help the Japanese mvestigate the possibil- , . r, , , ,, „ ■ j, ^- .t 

.. „ !!..•£. icnTTc r. u claim with graphs and tables as well as mformation the 

ity of removing pollution from over 150 U.S. military bases /^ • j , . .■ •. ^j 

, ° , , T- • L .1 1 ^^i. T government is required to supply to an active, mterested 

across Js^an, Dr. Joel Feigenbaum recently spoke at the Japan ^ ^ '^^ ■' 

Peace Conference. Dr. Feigenbaum is concerned ^ ^' 

about "reducing military activity, and stopping the damage it 

does to surrounding com- 



'If the experience of Cape Cod 
can in some small way help in this 
effort, then the unspeakable suf- 
fering of our people from the toxic 
legacy of warfare will not have 
been in vain.' 



munities," ;he told an au- 
dience of 200 or more. 

Dr.Feigenbaum, a 
CCCC mathematics pro- 
fessor, began investigation 
in 1982 of environmental 
and health damage which 
he suspected was being 
caused by maneuvers at 
Otis Air Force Base. 

His activities attracted the _ 

attention of the American 

Friends Service Committee, a Quaker organization con- 
cerned with the future role of Japan in keeping of world peace . 
Dr. Feigenbaum explained that Japan is unique 
because it is the only country that was a target of atomic 
bombs, and "Tokyo is the only capital city in the world where 
there is a foreign military base." 

Many Japanese would like to see the departure of the 
military bases, Dr. Feigenbaum said. "Jets flying at low 
altitudes are not appreciated by people who value peace and i„ i,: „ ^„Ji]. 

tranquility. Furthermore, what are the bases doing to the 
environment," he asked. 



One graph shows that in 1989 the number of 
women with cancer in the five communities surrounding 
__________^_____ Otis was 60 percent above 

the state average. The com- 
munities studied were 
Bourne, Sandwich, 

Mashpee, Falmouth and 
Barnstable. 

The dumping of air- 
craft fuels containing toxic 
lead and cancer causing 
chemicals is responsible for 
these high rates, Dr. 
Feigenbaum said in his re- 
port. Other harmfiil prac- 



tices on the base included burning waste oils, burning 
excess gun powder, and storing hazardous wastes in defec- 
tive, illegal, underground tanks, he said. 

Dr. Feigenbaum told his audience that members 
of communities should take care of "their ovra real needs." 
In an interview, he said that people should use their 
expertise in whatever field they have to protect the health 



In his speech, he said, "If the experience of Cape 
Cod can in some small way help in this effort, then the 



A J- . .1. J . .u J »!. ff . cn^- unspeakable suffermgofour people from the toxic legacy 
According to the data gathered on the effects of Otis . '^ , •„ . ^ l ■ ■ <■ 
^ ofwarfare will not have been mvam. 



to the underlying aquifer, it could mean serious damage. 

"The horror story of toxic pollution on Upper Cape 
Cod, my home, is useful because the relatively well docu- 
mented contamination there serves as a partial guide to what 
neighbors of bases on the Japanese Home Islands and in 



The Japan peace conference is one of the only 
forums which reminds the Japanese people of their history 
of military aggression in World Warn. 



What kind of student are you? 

Matriculating vs. counter 

by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Staff Writer 

Are you a matriculating student? 

Are you a counter student? 

Are you unsure? 

Do you care? 

You need to care if you intend to graduate or go 
on to another school. 

In 1991 the college combined day and evening 
students into one student body. The distinction now lies in 
the terminology "matriculating" and "counter." 

A matriculated student is working towards a 
degree, has an advisor, and is able to pre-register prior to 
registration day. This way they have the advantage of 
getting the first chance at required classes which normally 
■fiU up quickly. 

In order to receive financial aid a student must be 
matriculated. 

Counter students may already have a degree, and 
may be taking a class to help them in their field or taking 
classes because of personal interest. 

According to Registrar Martin Grace, the major- 
ity of stadents at CCCC are counter students. They may 
already be enrolled at another college, but are here for a 
semester for one reason or another. Depending on arrange- 
ments made with the colleges they normally attend, these 
students may transfer the credits earned here to the other 
college. 

A counter student is not invited to pre-registra- 
tion, but signs up for classes at the counter in the registrar ' s 
office, (thus the name counter students). They must pay 
for the class upon registration whereas the matriculated 
student may be billed. 

November 16 is pre-registration day for matricu- 
lated students in the North building. The closer one is to 
graduation the earlier that you will be scheduled to regis- 
ter. 

continued to page 13 



page 4 Mainsheet November 4, 1993 



Opinion 




would like to apologize 



Viewpoint 



by CHARLES THIBODEAU 



Not being Native Ameri- 
can, Homosexual, Fenfiale, Jew- 
ish, Black, or any of the other designated minorities in our 
country I don' t know the pain of discrimination. I don't know 
the pain of being called a Swamp Nigger, Queer, — t. Kike, 

or Black Mother r. But I do know the pain of seeing 

people I love dearly devastated by vulgar labels and all- 
encompassing statements about minorities, whose life's 
breath seems a challenge to the status quo. 

When you are bom in this countrv the color of your 
skin and the name of your God can entitle you to a lifetime 
membership in the "Establishment." Anything other than 
White Christian Male entitles you to minority status. In 
America all the rights, rules, and regulations are tailored to 
suit this White Christian Male. 



America has never given all its children equal 
rights, nor honored our commitments and agreements to all 
our people. We have never relinquished control over people 
of color. We have broken peace and land treaties with Native 
American Indians. We deny equal rights to women, who are 
the backbone and broad shoulders of this nation. We send our 
children off to distant lands to kill other children. We 
imprisoned Americans because their ancestors were Japa- 
nese. During W.W.n we turned ships fiill with Jews away 
from our shores, with fiill knowledge of what would happen 
to these people on their return to Europe. We have created 
ghettos that fester because of the refusal to share available 
resources. 

The list of immoral actions, both legal and illegal, 
by my country is boundless. The suffering caused by these 
actions cannot be measured, nor reimbursed. For all of this 
and so much more, I would like to apologize to you who have 
been abused, denied, and ignored by my country. 



A wake up call: 

Opression takes place on this campus every day 



Vieivpoixit 



by ROSEANNA PENA-WARFIELD 

The article printed in the October 21, 1993 edition of 
Main Sheet by Tom Redmond entitled "Through ill-gotten 
gains" has forced me to respond with dismay. This article has 
reminded me of and is a fine example of the conscious and 
unconscious acts of oppression which exist and take place on 
our campus from day to day. Tom please understand that 
racism is used as a political tool to advantage people of 
European decent over people of African, Asian, Hispanic 
and Aboriginal descent. 

We as a community must understand that racism and 
other forms of oppression hurts all of us. We are divided by 
racism and other forms of oppression, but most importantly 
racism is used to perpetuate economic and social class 
inequalities based on identification with a certain "racial 
group." 

Let us not kid ourselves - aracist society is a sick society, 
so everyone within it is in some way affected by the sickness. 
In general, racism breeds problems such as hate, fear, and 
distrust. For people on the receiving end of racism, it means 
being prejudiced, stereotyped, discriminated against and 



sometimes harassed or physically abused. 

AU forms of oppression cause specific groups within our 
populations to have problems such as gaining employment, 
being excluded from social status groups, and often forcing 
one to bear scars of and by other's fears. 

We as a community must begin to take responsibility for 
changing attitudes and actions. We must start educating 
ourselves and each other and begin to acknowledge, appre- 
ciate and respect our differences. 

There are a number of steps we can take to combat 
racism and other forms of oppression. Some of these are: 

1. Encourage dialogues where all of us can learn more 
about each other by sharing ideas and experiences and 
honestly confronting our prejudices. 

2. Read books and attend cultural events and movies 
produced by people of different backgrounds. 

3. Organize workshops, take a class, form discussion 
groups and visit museums and other cultural centers. 

4. Take an active role in our communities. Join in the 
struggle for employment equity and other human rights 
legislation. Get involved with active community groups, 
boards of education and labor boards to make the public and 
private sectors accoimtable to the communities they serve. 

5 . Promote reaUstic images and information about people 
from different racial and cultural backgrounds in learning 
material. 



MdIN SHEET 



Editorial Staff 

Sheila Johnson 
Michele Queenan 
Kevin Moulton 
Beverly Delaney 
Bryan Russell 
David Whitmore 
Jack Higgins 
Tom Redmond 
Katie Banis 
Vincent Raimo 
Charles Thibodeau 
Cindy Steiimiueller 
Darlene Mokrycki 
Walter Rivieccio 



William Babner 

Sherry Aheam 
Michele Auclair 
Laurel Bloom 
Nancy Brennan 
Jon Coutino 
Sarah Curley 
Jennifer Dixon 
Brian Ford 



Contributors 



Editor in chief 

Focus 

Features 

Photos 

Arts/Photos 

Photos 

Entertainment 

Campus News/ 

Women's Issues 

Graphics 

Editorial 

Campus Life 

Copy 

Advertising 

Faculty Advisor 

Evan Foster 

Ada KeUy 

Robert Koenig 

TerriLadd 

Martha' Love 

Melissa Phaneuf 

Erin Rose 

Jayme Wood 



Letters Policy: Letters must include the 
writer's name in order to be published. 
MainSheet reserves the right to edit to suit 
length and style requirements. We regret 
that we cannot accept poetry. 



The MainSheet is a member of 

NECNA 
(New England Collegiate 
Newspaper Association) 



Anti-racism education involves exposing the destruc- 
tiveness of racial prejudice. We all have grown up in this 
racist and oppressive society and it is going to take a lot of 
work in order to change things. As a member of this 
institution of Higher Education, I feel we must begin to 
combat misconceptions and provide accurate knowledge 
about people of colour and First Nations people. Eiffopean 
biases can be challenged, by integrating historical and con- 
temporary information that presents alternative cultural per- 
spectives. 

There are too many of us on campus who need to be more 
visible and vocal. We need to empower one another now, 
individually and collectively, to make sure we are repre- 
sented and recognized. It is time for all of us to take the 
blinders off, to open our eyes, and wake up. 



J 



Letter to the Editor 



Wampanoag Tribal Council member rebuts MainSheet editorial 



I was shocked, as many were, by the pictures on last 
week's news broadcast of the latest massacre of a Muslim 
village in Bosnia.Casualties of the latest round of ethnic 
cleansing, the inhabitants of the village were victims of 
ruthless attempts to separate the people from their land. Most 
horrifying were the pictures of dead children huddled in a 
comer with their fists held up in a vain attempt to hide from 
the horror before them. 

In order to separate people from churches, homes and 
graves of their ancestors, in other words their native rights, 
drastic methods are often used. 

We must all agree that it is a crime against humanity for 
a whole population to be killed merely to separate a people 
from the land that they feel is their own. Yes, this is truly 
among the worst of crimes. 

Ignorance is a word that implies a certain degree of 
innocence; that is, one simply does not know what is true. 

In Bosnia, those who do these horrific wrongs choose to 
ignore the truth of the wrong that they do. 

History shows us that the victors will go onto teach their 
children that they fought a war on the side of good, righteous- 
ness, and the horrors and wrongs which were committed will 
be ignored. There is no innocence in those who chose to 
ignore. 

I was also shocked by the article by Tom Redmond in the 
October 21 issue of the MainSheet. 

Here I was told by a third generation Irish American that 
he is a native bom American, and that Indians should not be 
treated any differently than any other minority, that Indians 



should pay tax. I say all of that is bullshit. 

In the English langiage a word can be used in many 
different ways. Indians in the past who didn't understand that 
aspect of the English language said that the white man spoke 
with a forked tongue. 



'First, in the article, an attempt was 
made to confuse people on the word 
"native." This Indian is no longer 
ignorant of how many English words 
can be twisted into many different 
meanings/ 



First, in the article, an attempt was made to conftise 
people on the word "native." This Indian is no longer 
ignorant of how many English words can be twisted into 
many different meanings. I do not buy the idea that a native 
bom American is in any way similar to a native American. 

Second, Mr. Redmond says that Indians should be 
treated no differently than any other minority. 

1 don't like the way minorities (including the Irish) have 
been treated in this country. I do not want to be treated that 
way. Indians have been continually freated differently by the 



military, by the courts, and by religious and educational 
institutions in continuing attempts to separate them from 
their just claims to their land. 

If Indian people were not being treated differently all 
taxes would be paid to the indigenous people of the Westem 
hemisphere. 

If Indian people were not treated differently, their 
governments, their religious institutions, and their lan- 
guages would stiU be intact. 

If Indian people were not freated differently, their 
history would be taught instead of ignored. 

Also ignored are the crimes that are associated with the 
conquest of the Americas. 

If the past heros and leaders of this great nation were to 
be held up to the same scmtiny as those men who were tried 
at Nurinburg, then many of them would be hanging on the 
endof arope, too. 

If all laws were equally applicable, almost all of the land 
and deeds in this country would be considered stolen; and all 
of those holding this land would be recipients of stolen 
goods. 

Finally Mr. Redmond says as Native Americans, that we 
should be paying tax. I ask why should we? 

All my relations, 

Russell Peters 

Board of Directors, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Council ] 

League of Indigenous Soverign Nations 

American Indian Movement 



Campus Life 



Mainsheet November 4, 1993 page 5 



Faculty Commentary: Professor Ted Panitz 



'They pay me to do what I love to do ... teach' 




Why is Cape Cod Com- 
munity College important to 
me? This is the question I 
would like to address in my 
faculty commentary. 

During my 17 years at 
CCCC I have had the opportu- 
nity to meet and work with 
many wonderful people. Ev- 
Professor Ted Panitz ery class I teach is unique. 
The course material may be 
the same but the students are always different. This is, to me, 
what makes college teaching so interesting and exciting. I 
have been able to grow personally and professionally, matur- 
ing in my approach to dealing with people and handling 
academic subjects. 

Working at CCCC enabled me to return to school at 
Boston University where I was taught the educational ap- 
proach of humanistic psychology. Simply stated, this ap- 
proach involves getting students involved with their own 
education, and taking responsibility for their own learning. 
This seemed like a good life philosophy, and I have 
adopted it for myself. Being able to watch people grow, by 
their taking advantage of all that CCCC has to offer, and 
being part of that process is the most rewarding aspect of 



working here. As a matter of fact, it doesn't feel like work 
at all, but a labor of love. They pay me to do what I love to 
do. 

In order to share this colimm with my students I 
posed the question to students in each of my classes. The 
following are their comments: 

"CCCC is important to me because I really enjoy 
being a student. It's a very castial and friendly campus." 

"The faculty isthe best in my experience. I've been 
here off and on for three years, but I'm in no hurry to move 
on." 

"It's important to me because it helps me to take 
classes needed for a four-year college. For those of us who 
are undecided about our majors, we can take different 
courses to try and figure out what to do instead of going to a 
four year college undecided." 

"The location, quality of teachers and their willing- 
ness to help the students." 

"CCCC is a place close to home, and allows me to 
work and save money for seven more years of college. I like 
the fact that you can obtain a decent college education for a 
reasonable price. CCCC is also a very reputable community 
college which is important to someone who is transferring 
like myself." 

"Because I never took my SAT's and was unable to 



Student Profile: Na'Keisha Pimentel 




Piato if Cittili SteimaeHer 



Age: 19 
Hometown: Hyannis 

Course of Study: Medical Office Administration 

What do yoo like best about CCCC? it's a friendly 
campus. CCCC is giving me a chance to provide 
G good future for my son. 



What do you like least about CCCC? The time I 
spend hanging around v^^aiting for the B-Bus. 

Who has been your most Influential professor? Dr. 

Cahoon, he's a very good teacher. He outlines 
the work which makes It easier for me to learn. 



What books and movies would you recommend? 

The Elementals, it's scary. My favorite movie was 
The Color Purple. 

What's your pet peeve? People who don't flick 
their ashes. They let them get so long that they 
drop off on the rug! 

Howdoyouspendyourfreetime? Sharing quality 
time with my 7 month old son Parris. 

What message would you send to the president? 

Stay out of Haiti's business. 



couasE 

NO SECIIOK 

HiJWMlTIES 



Spring Schedule 1994 



TIHE 
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Registration 
begins No- 
vember 16. 
Remember 
to meet with 
your advisor 
soon! 

November 12 
is the last day 
to drop a 
course. 

Schedule con- 
tinued on page 
12 



enter a four year college. CCCC has an open door policy so 
I am able to begin college here and be able to continue to a 
four year college. 

"Small classes, one on one attention from teachers." 

"I have the opportunity to meet lots of people since 
I am new to the area and it is a way for me to nanow down 
my choices for a future career." 

"It is important to me for the knowledge I get firom 
each class." 

"I have children and a husband and would hate to 

travel to Boston. A lot of people wouldn't" be in college if 

it meant going off cape. I am excited about earning my 

Associate's degree. Without CCCC this would not be 

possible." 

"The teachers. They give us the push that we need 

to obtain a good education. There is a great deal of support 

at CCCC." 

"It is important because I have invested a lot of 
money and time into the classes here." 

"CCCC gives me the opportunity to have a mean- 
ingfiil career as well as shape and/or sharpen skills that I need 
or already have. It also exposes me to an academic environ- 
ment that I thought was lost to me." 

I hope you have enjoyed reading these reasons why 
CCCC is important to us, as I have. Perh£^)s you will see your 
reasons among these. 

Professor Panitz has been teaching mathematics at 
CCCC since 1976. 

Come Ski With Us! 

by CINDY STEINMUELLER 

Campus Editor 

In addition to affordable rates on great ski packages, 
the Ski Club offers the chance to bmld confidence and long 
term Mendships said Keith Davis, club presiocat. 

"Skiiig for me has been therapeutic, I'm like a 
different person once I hit the slopes. Tl 3 friendships I've 
made as a result of being a member of the Ski Club will last 
for life," said Mr. Davis. He believes that once someone has 
conquered the slopes, one can ^ply that confidence towards 
their educational gotJs. 

Whether you ski the "Buimy Slopes" or "Black 
Diamond", the Ski Club welcomes all. "Everybody starts at 
the top of the mountain," says Davis, "and ends at the 
bottom." Desire, not proficiency, is required, he added. 

Proceeds from the Ski Club ' s bake sales and evening 
coffee shop help defray the cost of the trips for members. The 
coffee shop is located in the South Building, from 4:30 to 
8:30 pm. Contributing time to the coffee shop or donating 
baked goods are the only requirements for meir ■ jrship in the 
club. 

Students, faculty, and their families are encouraged 
to join in the fiin, make new fiiends and enjoy the firesh 
moimtain air. The Ski Club meets tuesdays at 12:30 in NG 
10. For sign-up, and more information on ski trips, contact 
Diane Grondin in the Financial Aid office. 









•a 
o 

U 

V 

a, 

U 



Free Pregnancy Testing 

Non-Judgemental 

Guidance 

Support Groups 




CQ 



298 Main Street, Hyannis 

800-439-1172 
771-1102 



page 6 Mainsheet Wovember 4, 1993 



Feature's 



Jean Kilbourne: Selling addiction via advertising 



by SHEILA JOHNSON 

Editor in CInief 



Every day we are exposed 

to over 1500 advertisements. 

These ads sell a great deal 

more than just the products 

they expose. They sell values, 

images, concepts of success, 

worth, love and sexuality, 

popularity, and normalcy. 

Sometimes they sell addictions. 



Jean Kilbourne, Ed.D., is an internationally known media 
critic and creator of slide presentations and films. In her 
presentations she examines the harmfiil effects of advertis- 
ing on society. She has two award-winning films, "Killing 
Us Softly" and "Calling the Shots", and has twice received 
the Lecturer of the Year award firom the National Association 
for Campus Activities. 

At UMASS/Dartmouth Ms. Kilbourne gave her presenta- 
tion "Under the Influence: The Pushing of Alcohol via 
Advertising." Several students ft'om CCCC attended the 



lecture. 

The most widely used drug today in America is alcohol. 
Alcohol is responsible for ten percent of the deaths in the U.S. 
Last year, two billion dollars were spent on advertising 
alcohol. According to Ms. Kilbourne, alcohol companies 
claim they are not advertising to acquire new consumers but 
rather just trying to get consumers to switch brands. The 
companies are not concerned with our health, but rather in 
makingabuck. "Ifeveryadulthad2drinksaday,theirprofit 
would lose 40%," she said. 

In one year Absolute Vodka's new campaign featuring 
slogans such as "Absolute Van Gogh", had an increase in 
profit firom 540 thousand to 2.4 million dollars. 

Several beer and alcohol corporations, such as Miller, are 
big contributors to the Partnership for a Drug Free America 
program. What Miller and the others are not telling us is that 
alcohol is responsible for more deaths than all illegal drugs 
combined. Last year there were 30,000 deaths related to 
illegal drug use, 100,000 fi-om alcohol and 400,000 from 
nicotine. 

Advertising Age, a magazine for advertisers, features ads 
that consumers have never seen before, and are not meant to 
see. The companies are advertising you as the product, such 
as this advertisement for Cosmopolitan, "Cosompolitan 
readers drank 21,749,000 glasses of beer in the last week 
...Isn't it time you gave Cosmopolitan a shot?" Consumers 
are being featured, not the product. 

"We are the product, everything else is secondary," said 
Ms. Kilbourne. 

"Drinking provokes desire but takes away the perfor- 
mance," said Ms. Kilbourne on the affects of alcohol and sex. 
Advertisers treat sex as ajoke. "May all your screw drivers 
be Harvey Wallbangers," she added. 

Alcohol provokes abuse and rape, especially date rape, 



Student journalists exchange ideas 



by DARLENE MOKRYCKI 

Copy Editor 



Budding student journalists were told not to be afraid to 
priot any opinion with the two exceptions of libel and 
vulgarity beyond acceptable limits at a campus journalistic 
conference in Boston, last Saturday. 

Mr. Len Levin of the Providence Journal Bulletin, a 
facilitator at the conference, 
told journalists that editorials 
are meant to tip off the reader 
that the paper is not afraid to 
take sides on any issue. 

"Make sure you run letters 
or coliunns from people who 
disagree with you," he said. 
"While the constitution guar- 
antees the right to express opin- 
ion, you have an obligation to 
allow dissenting opinion," said 
Mr. Levin. "This sets up a 
dialogue to get all sides of an 
issue out." 

These ideas were discussed 
along with editing methods, 
problem solving, increasing 
revenue, photographic how- 
to 's and other pertinent subject matter at the conference 
which was held at the Christian Science Monitor Learning 
Center. 

The keynote speaker, Mr. Dan Warner, editor of the 
LawTence Eagle Tribune told the group that dramatic strides 
in technology were on the horizon. With the advent of 
interactive opportunities he said the largest question would 
be one of public acceptance and use of the technology. 

Mr. Warner went on to say that the secret is control. "You 
must learn to control fhe media, and not vice- versa," he said. 
"The press is an awesome servant, but a terrible master," 
Warner quoted from James Fenimore Cooper. 

He illusfrated the power of the press citing the impact of 
MTV's controversial Beavis and Butt-head cartoon which is 
allegedly the influential faqtor deemed to have incited a five- 
year-old's burning down of a house frailer and the subsequent 
death of the child's sibling. 

Mr. Warner mentioned that journalists often do not 
realize the awesome power of their media. He said that he 
felt certain that the creators of Beavis and Butt-head never 
envisioned a ttagedy such as this happening because of 
someone viewing their cartoon. 

He quoted Thomas Jefferson regarding the media calling 




MainSheet Staff 



it "that polluted villain." He also cited John Adams' denigra- 
tion of the press "hired agent of a monied system and set up 
for [another] purpose to tell lies that serve its purpose." 

Mr. Warner went on to say that the press became so 
powerful in the U.S. because of the Bill of Rights. These 
were the "freedoms we have cherished for centuries and 
made them the law of the land." Freedom ofthe press was 
written into the constitution by our forefathers who fled from 
lands where this freedom was not an inalienable right. 

Mr. Warner said that the 
"press suffers precious few 
controls, but has awesome 
power." He againquoted Tho- 
mas Jefferson saying "no gov- 
ernment should ever be with- 
out censors and where the press 
is free, no one ever will." 

Regarding attribution he 
said that too many of us ask for 
the easy way out, and that we 
have gotten ourselves away 
from what we know to be right, 
good, true, honest and fair. 
He said that his paper prints 
absolutely no anonymous 
soiu"ces...none. 

The convention, the "8th 
Annual Workshop and Con- 
ference for Campus Journalists" sponsored by the New 
England Collegiate Newspaper Association, was hosted by 
the Christian Scientists of Boston. 

Following Mr. Warner's speech, the group, was freated to 
a tour ofthe Christian Science Monitor facility, the home of 
the international daily paper. Fifteen students and faculty 
from CCCC along wdth about 100 others from various 
campuses across New England toured the paper's newsroom 
and surroimding grounds. A walk inside the Monitor's 
massive stained-glass globe was a highlight ofthe tour, along 
with a look at their state of the art elecfronic typesetting 
capabilities which includes full color capability. 

Next the "College Newspaper ofthe Year" was chosen. 
Harvard's "Crimson" was bestowed with the highest honors 
ofthe day. 

The election of officers for next year preceded the 
election of a faculty advisor for that coming year. CCCC 
Professor Bill Babner was chosen by the group to be the 1994 
advisor. This was quite an honor for Bill and for the college, 
considering that his competition came form some of New 
England's finest institutions. 

All in all the conference was adjudged to be a rousing 
success, and plans are already being formulated for next 
year's convention. 



according to Ms. Kilbourne. Half of all violent crimes in U.S. 
are alcohol related. Slogans such as "If your date won't listen 
to you... Try a velvet hammer," makes the subject of rape 
seem trivial. A few members ofthe audience laughed at this 
ad but Ms. Kilbourne was quick to say "rape is not a fimny 
situation." 



"When you get hooked on alcohol 
you lose independence, freedom, 
and power, " said Ms. Kilbourne 
"which is exactly what the alcohol 
companies want you to lose." 

In an article foimd in Advertising Age in October of 1 99 1 , 
an editorial appeared which linked sexism in beer ads to 
sexual harassment. "There is a double standard, if a man is 
drunk, he is excused ofhalf the rapes committed. If a woman 
is drunk she is at fault," said Ms. Kilbourne. 

Alcoholism is a disease. Advertisements such as this 
slogan; "Edgar Allen Sttoh" make fim ofthe disease. Edgar 
Allen Poe died from alcohol. One out of ten drinkers are 
alcoholics. At least one in four teenagers between the ages 
of 14-17 have a problem with alcohol. Alcohol related 
accidents are the leading cause of deaths forthe young adults 
aged 15-24. Alcohol is the number one reason for birth 
defects. 

The average age in which a child logins to drink is 12. 
Thirty-five percent of all wine coolers are sold to high school 
juniors and seniors. "They were created with young people 
in mind," said Ms. Kilbourne "advertisers use campaigns 
featuring animals to target these younger people." 

"When you get hooked on alcohol you lose independence, 
freedom, and power, " said Ms. Kilbourne "which is exactly 
what the alcohol companies want you to lose." 

Library offers more 
than just books 

by BOB KOENIG 

Staff Writer 

If you enter the library and tend to feel puzzled, do the 
right thing: Ask for help from one ofthe librarians. Finding 
material or using resources can be confusing and time 
consuming, so do what Librarian Adrieime Latimer suggests, 
"Don't hesitate to ask for help from one of the librarians 
before you start yoitf research, it will save you a lot of time." 

And a lot of time can be spent at the CCCC library. With 
50,000 books, and nearly 500 subscriptions to newspapers, 
magazines and scholarlyjoumals, the library is well stocked. 
The library is furnished wdth a meiiia section, which is 
located on the ground floor and contains over 5000 audio- 
visual items including hundreds of video tapes. 

'Don't hesitate to ask for help 
from one of the librarians * 



The Cape Cod History room is also located on the grou 
floor, and can be fascinating to sudents young and old. Hoi 
are limited for this room, however, to Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

One of the finest resources the library has to offer 
CLAMS and InfoTrac. CLAMS (Cape Libraries Automate 
Materials Sharing) is a computerized research system, whic 
is installed in 23 libraries throughout the Cape and Martha'l 
Vineyard. 

InfoTrac is a computerized newspaper and periodical^ 
■ index, and Adrienne Latimer says the most important rule for 
using any of the reference resources is, "make sure you ' 
carefully read the screens, and follow directions when using 
these computers." 

The Library, roomy and relaxing, and can be a great place 
to study and do homework. Abby Daniels, a student, says she 
enjoys coming to the library, "because it's a quiet place for 
me to read." April Myers finds the library a good place to 
meet with friends. 

So go to the library, bring your student I.D. card for 
checking out books, and never hesitate to ask for help from 
one ofthe friendly, helpfid librarians. 



Entertainment 



Mainsheet November 4, 1993 page 7 




CD Review: 

Blues Traveler "Save His Soul" 

Third effort needs more to get over the top 



by Jack Higgins 

Entertainment Editor 



Blues Traveler, the quartet from New York City, is 
back on the scene with their latest release "Save His Soul." 
This disc is a strong effort, but not quite enough to get them 
out of the quagmire of mediocrity they seem to have settled 
into—with the record buying public anyway. 

You certainly know from the sound that it's Blues Trav- 
eler, but some cuts are fresh and new-sounding. Others sound 
like out-takes from their second release, "Travelers and 
Thieves" (they may in fact be out-takes since lead vocalist, 
and harmonica ace, John Popper suffered a nearly fatal 
motorcycle crash during the recording of this disc). 

Though the disc is a bit uneven, the music is generally 
strong, and the lyrical content is superior to their previous 
two efforts. 

On the opening track "Trina Magna," there is somewhat of 
a change in their style of musical arrangement, which 
includes a gospel-sounding choir and a Leslie-style organ 
effect on the harmonica. Another musically effective track, 
which could make it on to FM playlists is "Defense and 



Desire," probably the most straightforward rocker on the 
disc. 

The topics that are brought up on this disc seem to be more 
earnest than their previous efforts. "Letter From A Friend," 
tells the tale of two friends who have a friend that dies: One 
carries on and learns from the incident, the other degenerates 
into a world of insanity. 

"Go Outside and Drive" is the story of a man 
imprisoned within his own home because of drug addiction. 
When someone tries to help him he says, "I think I need a 
prison/in order to dream of being free." 

"Manhattan Bridge" is a very sweet instrumental, 
with standout acoustic work by guitarist Chan Kinchla. 

By far the bestpiece on the disc is "Whoops," asong 
that speaks out against laboratory animal testing (specifi- 
cally chimpanzees, because they cry like a human child), and 
about this paradise, earth, which we have taken for granted 
and trashed. 

This disc may have been much better if the recording was 
not disrupted by John Popper's accident. Maybe next time 
out they can put it all together and serve us something fiill of 
Ufe instead of pot luck. 



WKKL: Alive and well on the air 



by Brian Ford 

Staff Writer 



WKKL crew adds a new mix to this semester's sound 



Picture this: you're in your car, flipping through the 
stations, you stumble upon atop-40 dance music station, but 
for some odd reason, you're just not in the mood to hear some 
1 3 year-old girl request the latest New Kids on the Block hit. 

OK, no biggie. How about a little classic rock? 
Then you think to yourself, "Wait. . . , I like Led Zeppelin, but 
can't these guys play anything else?" What else is on? 
Howard Stem? Nope. Rush Limbaugh? Please. Is there 
anything out there that I might actually want to hear? 

Out of flrustration, you hit the scan button. Through 
passing sounds of local news in Spanish, and something else 
by Englebert Humperdinck, your tuner stumbles onto 90.7, 
where you finally hear something cool, something different! 

Welcome to WKKL, the station operated by the 
CCCC radio club. WKKL has a completely alternative 
format. Playing anything from reggae to heavy metal, 
WKKL is establishing itself as a primal radio presence on 
Cape Cod. 

With its main focus on alternative variety, WKKL 
has four main specialty shows, broadcast on Sunday, Mon- 
day, Thursday, and Saturday. For you Metalheads, Sunday 
night offers Scott Segal's "Metal-itis: It's not a disease, it's 
a cure!" Scott will do his best to destroy your hearing from 




The Beverly Hillbillies 

a wild jaunt down memory lane 



by Sheila Caldwell 
Staff writer 

For all those "40 something" age folks who spent 
endless days after school laughing at the television series The 
Beverly Hillbillies, here is a nostalgic trip of innocent 
slapstick humor. 37ie Beverly Hillbillies movie is a wildly 
entertaining jaunt down memory lane, unless of course you 
still spend endless days in front of channel 38. 

The full house audience roared in unison as the 
"Texas tea" spurted up from the ground, pouring down on Jed 
and his faithful dog Duke. Oh, did 1 give away the story? 

The movie cleverly transfers the Clampetts to the 
90 's without absence of the usual antics of ridiculous fun that 
made the television series a hit. By the way, Elly May's 
monkey has aged well over the years. The injection of 
modem day happenings— highway shootings and echoes of 
Jeopardy's theme song-add to the humor of the light hearted 
plot of greedy Califomians attempting to swindle the hicks. 

Surprise visits from Zsha Zsha Gabor and Buddy 
Ebsen, who played the original Jed, offer a silly twist to the 
flick. 
■■■■ ■ ■■■■ ■■■ ■■■■■ ■ ■■■■I 



Movie Review 



Although Max Baer' s hyperactive stupidity as Jethro 
was sadly missed, Lily Tomlin undoubtedly makes up for 
this with an outstanding performance as Jane Hathaway. 
Tomlin's lanky physique and peculiar body gestures only 
strengthen her wittiness as the banker's kiss secretary. 

Some critics have attacked the fihn, calling it 
"cardboard" and "stupid," but let us not deny the television 
series itself was in fact quite stupid. But is there harm in an 
amusing family flick with no sex, no violence, just all out 
hilarious slapstick? One cannot view this movie in search of 
an inner meaning or deep plot. Let me tell you right now, 
your not going to find any. 

If you need an excuse to check out this mindless 
movie, invite your friend's kids, but be prepared to laugh 
more than they do. The humor is the exact same silliness that 
had you chuckling years ago. 

The Adams Family remake sparked a witty hint of 

days gone by, The Beverly Hillbillies, yet another. What next 

Gilligan's Island, maybe Green Acresl You know you 

would be buying a ticket and popcom for that. 

...And let the credits roll ... the fun doesn't stop there! 




EMPORIUM 

Largest bead store on Cape Cod 

Offering semi-precious, glass, crystal,' 

seed beads, bone, leather and findings 

^ring in this ad for a 20% discount 1 

I Ex^esJl/3p/93} 

590 Main Street, Hyannis 

790-0005 




w p.m. to 1 a.m.. 

Mondays on WKKL, from 7 to 10 p.m., it's Tommy 
G's "Jamaican Soundsystem," featuring the best reggae the 
human race has to offer. Thursday's, from 1 1 p.m. to 1 a.m., 
Alex X (no relation to Malcolm), hits the airwaves for 
"Sleepless," his Avant Garde/Progressive alternative show. 
Lastly, on Saturdays, it's D.B. on the Cape, playing 
choiceOtherwise, tuning into 90.7 FM will bring you a 
satellite broadcast of WBUR, a radio station out of Boston 
University. But don't expect to hear the same format on 
WBUR, as they consist mostly of talk radio. 

You also won't hear those long, boring commer- 
cials on WKKL. Since WKKL is a publicly funded station 
at a college institution, the FCC prohibits private advertising 
on their airwaves. However, they do allow imderwriting, 
which is an endorsement of a private company who may help 
sponsor a certain show orperiodofairtime. 

WKKL is a school sponsored club operation, who 
are always looking for new members to join. If you have any 
interest in becoming your own cool radio personality, give 
WKKL music director Sherry Aheam a call at the station or 
leave a message there. 

These specialty radio shows aren't the only thing 
WKKL has to offer. Other nights you can tune into "Gouvair 
on the Air" on Sunday evenings, "Prime Time" with Dave on 
Thiursday nights, "The Klown" late on Mondays, Brian 
Johnson and the "Slick Dog Rick R." on Wednesdays, and 
"Pokey," followed by a man who calls himself "3XB" on 
Friday nights. Sunday afternoons belong to Jose and then K. 
Vincent from 3 to 7 p.m.. 

Requests? "If we have it, we'll play it. We take 
requests anytime," K. Vincent said. Forarequest, call 362- 
7766 for whatever you want to hear. Just leave those New 
Kids requests for another station. 

Unfortunately, WKKL is not permitted to broadcast 
24 hours a day. On weekdays, the station runs from 7 p.m. 
to 1 a.m., and on Saturday and Sunday from noon to 1 a.m. 



Boston Fun 

At the Orpheum: 

The Rocky Horror Show (live on 

stage) 

Fri. Nov. 5th 11 p.m. $17.50 

At Avalon: 

Matthew Sweet 

Fri. Nov. 5th 7 p.m. $15.00 19+ 

Living Colour 

Tues. Nov. 9th 8 p.m. $18.50 

19+ 

Stir It Up Reggae Dancehall 

Party 

Mon. Nov. 8th 8 p.m. $15 adv/ 

$17 day of show 19+ 

Aimee Mann 

Fri. Nov 12th 7 p.m. $15 18+ 

The Lemonheads 

Tues.+ Weds. Nov 23rd + 24th 

8 p.m. $15 all ages 





Rehearsal And Performance 



Alex Connor and Kevin Ferry 




The Rehearsal and Performance class, taught by Professor Nancy Willets, will be 
performing four one-act plays on November 19th and 20th at 8:00 p.m. in the studio 
theater here on campus. These plays have no charge, but a contribution to the cause 
would be greatly appreciated. 

The plays that Nancy has selected are witty and spontaneous. They do not follow 
a conventional tradition, rather more of the "off the beaten path" approach. With 
these types of plays, students learn how to use there acting abilities in different 
perspectives. 

Nancy works closely with the students, breaking done the scripts line by line. This 
method teaches the "up in coming actors" why they are moving in a particular 
direction or how to stay in focus in a scene. This collaboration enables them to better 
understand the contexts of their character. Also, students learn to rehearse together, 
helping them to build the foundation of the scene being performed. 

"R&P is not just for seasoned performers," Nancy explains, "this class is for anybody 
remotely interested in acting. I have students that have never taken a single acting 
class and completely enjoy performing." The R&P course is held on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the down stairs theater located in the 
Tilden Arts Building. by Bryan Russell 

The Royal Noise, songs of love and poetry 




i 



During the 1 6th centur/, a true gentle- 
man knew that the only way to court a 
lady was to demonstrate his talent in song, 
dance and poetry. If Cupid 'sorrow missed 
the object of his desire, the young man's 
passion turned to despair. These pains of 
lovers inspired the composers of eariy mu- 
sic which is performed by artists in resi- 
dence, "The Royall Noyse" (TRN). 

Dr. Robert Kidd, chairman of the Fine 
and Performing Arts Department and lover 
of early music was inspired to gather this 
group of musicians, academics, vocalists 
and lovers of literature to recreate the 
Elizabethan court style of entertainment. 
He explains that eariy music (written be- 
tween 1000 and 1 750) is popular today in 
Europe and in the United States. TRN's 
purpose is to expand the popularity of this 
music on the South Shore and the Cape by 
teaching people about it and the era in 
which it was created. 

Dr. Kidd further explains that "the word 



'noyse' was used to mean music well and 
sweetlyplayed," usually by the aristocracy 
who pretended to play with ease but 
"practiced like mad to pull it off." TRN's 
concern for accuracy demands that they 
use copies of the original music and instru- 
ments that ore reconstructed from the 
designs of the antique pieces. This period 
music come from five countries; England, 
Spain, Germany, Italy and France. 

The group, appearing in Elizabethan 
costumes, presented "They Lunatic, The 
Lover and The Poet" in October, at the 
Tilden Art Center and will be returning in 
December. They played "with airy grace" 
while bantering about the joys and trag- 
edies that love has bestowed upon most 
of us. This universal theme was meant to 
reach an audience from varying age 
groups and backgrounds and to enhance 
the feeling of peering from behind closed 
curtains at the aristocracy at play. 
Susan Willett, one of Dr. Kidd's music stu- 



dents and a vocalist, attended the pen 
mance. She noted that it was hard to) 
where the music of the instrument enc 
and the vocalist began which show 
that the performers had succeedec: 
blending the two sounds. Susan said ft 
"Linda Houle had not played the violai 
garriba long and seemed to have taH 
to it with such ease." 

Credit goes to the "Noyse of Musitio 
who ploy to the "antickes" pert^ormed 
TRN. This year's members are: Robert 
Kidd, Marcia W. Dalton, Lore Loftfji 
DeBower, Lucy M. Brett, Nancy W. DiX' 
Eugene G. Heyerdahl and Linda M. Ho( 

"The Royall Noyse" invites all to ex|3 
ence the "Noyse" of yesteryear durl 
their upcoming Christmas Concerts to' 
presented on December 3rd and 5th. ; 
formationaboutthegroupandtheirsch< 
uleofappeorancescanbeobtoinedfrc 
Robert Kidd in the Tilden Arts Center or 
calling 945-9525 or 771-8771 . ^V AdoKei 





Dance production underway 




■e's a dance production underway that will be shown at 
I'clock December 2 and 3 in the Tilden Art Center. The 
of this production is "The Dance of Life", produced by 
sCailunn. 

dance piece to be presented is in memory of a brave 
man Jimmy Hayes, who passed away from multiple 
is (MS). Mrs. Galium, teaches dance here at CCCC, knew 
/es well; he was her husbands cousin. 
3n Mrs. Galium first met Mr. Hayes seven years ago, he was 
hy, athletic young man. He was the captain of his football 
ind gave moral support to all the other players. "Jimmy 
had a sparkle in his eye," Mrs. Galium described. "As he 
i and worked with his teammates, you could see the 
jrf ul joy he possessed just being alive, sharing his soft sense 
orwith those that were around him." It was at this time that 
/es was diagnosed with MS. 

new complication in his life was overwhelming for him. 
ie next few years Mr. Hayes spent all his time trying to live 
is disease that was taking over his body. Ms. Gallums said, 



This is one of three articles ttiat wiil be writen about ttils performance. Next, I will 
be interviewing some of the performers, getting there insight on this production. 
Also, within this performance, there are dance pieces that have been submitted by 
students that co-inside with the theme of this dance; and will be interviewed as well. 

Kindred Spirits presented at art gallery 



"5 



"It was extremely sad to look into his eyes and watch him sink 
deeper into this weakened state." Mrs. Galium added, "to see a 
human being particularly somebody that you are close to go 
through such a grave ordeal and still have the courage to fight, 
gave me many sleepless nights just thinking about him." 

At the end, I remember looking at him in his hospital room, 
attached to life support machines. I watched him slowly pass 
away. Mrs. Galium said. 

As much as it was sad, Mrs. Gallums explained, i couldn ' t help 
but feel a greatjoy of relief come from his body. It felt like he hod 
been freed from such miserable pain. 

"Today, I feel happy when I think of Jimmy, I can imagine him 
playing football in heaven " Said Mrs. Galium. 

Jimmy Hayes joy for life, and the struggles he encountered is 
the theme of this dance production. It will be a three part dance 
piece, performed by faculty, students and special guest Brian 
Feigenbaum, collaborating different styles of dancing to express 
their objective. by Bryan Russell 



Fhe Higgins Art Gallery's exhibit of 
:k and white photographs by Eu- 
e Atget and Berenice Abbott 
Tied a somber display. I entered the 
sry late Saturday afternoon. 
lA/hile viewing the photographs, I 
zed that Atget had not only cap- 
d Paris at the turn of the century, but 
he had captured images reflected 
op windows and had blurred some 
es in the foreground while capturing 
Jils in the background. 
Abruptly, the pictures seemed to be 
3 modern. At this point I realized 
I was looking at another artist's 
jres of a different city (New York). 
he subject matter seemed similar, 
ty and change. 

this time I went to the desk and 
d questions. The attendant spoke 
Jt Atget and Abbott as if he knew 

and treated me to a more de- 

d tour of the exhibit. When I men- 

d the blurred images and reflec- 



tions, he said that Atget's camera was of 
a type where the amount of time that 
light was allowed into the box either 
created a clearer image or one less 
focused. 




Atget's method of developing his 
photographs included a wash in saltwa- 
ter which made them sensitive to sun- 
light. 



The photographs of both Berenice 
Abbott and Eugene Atget are at the 
end of the exhibit and in themselves 
seemed a bit eerie. Berenice Abbott 
admired Atget's simple pictures of a 
changing city to the point of buying 
some of Atget's photos and presen/ing 
them. She also asked him to sit for the 
photo which is included in this exhibit. 

According to the attendant, 
Abbott's admiration of Atget's work 
inspired her to record New York Gity 
during the depression era. Her photo- 
graphs reflect Atget's influence on her 
work. This is especially apparent in ex- 
hibit no. 27 in which she has super-im- 
posed a picture of older cars and a man 
over a photo of a bus terminal. It is a 
ghost-like image which remains with the 
viewer even upon exiting the show. The 
observer, having gained some incite into 
these two artists, then can view Atget's 
and Abbott's photographs by the galleryA 

exit. by Ada Kelley ^ 



2. 



page 10 Mainsheet November 4, 1993 



Fociis 



Is alcohol as 'sinful' as cigarettes? 



byMICHELEQUEENAN 

Focus Editor 



Drinking alcohol has been acceptable behavior for 
centuries. Alcohol is often a staple at parties, ceremonies, 
dinners, or sporting events. 

The alcohol contained in drinks is ethyl alcohol, a 
depressant drug that affects the brain and slows down central 
nervous system activity. As with most drugs that affect the 
brain, it has strong addictive properties and therefore can be 
easily abused. In fact, alcohol abuse is one of the most 
significant health-related drug problems in the United States 
today. 

President Clinton's omission of "health taxes" on 
alcohol from his funding formula for health care reform 
missed the opportunity to address America's most serious 
health and drug problem. "Alcoholism!" said Ben Jones 
director of The National Institute of Recovery. 

Hillary Rodham Clinton's defense of this "tobacco 
only" policy before a congressional committee showed a 



misunderstanding of the disease of alcoholism. Mrs. Clinton 
was comparing alcohol with caffeine and saying that alcohol 
should be "used as directed." 

Alcoholism, according to Family Medical Guide is 
defined as a physical and emotional dependence on the drug, 
characterized by excessive use and constant preoccupation 
with drinking. Alcohol abuse in turn leads to mental, 
emotional, physical, and social problems. 

According to Mr. Jones, 50 percent of the alcohol 
industry's profits come from alcoholism. Alcohol is a 
powerful addictive drug to one of 10 drinkers, and there is no 
way to know which one of 10 kids who picks up their first 
drink wiU suffer from the addiction. 

In realizing the possibility of higher alcohol taxes, 
Elizabeth Board of the Distilled Spirits Council of the U.S. 
warns, "The more you raise the tax on spirits, the more 
consumption goes down." 

Our nation has about 1 8 million alcoholics, each of 
whom directly impacts the lives of five other people in a 
negative way, according to Mr. Jones. Although legal, 
alcohol has created America's largest drug problem by fer. 



Consider these statistics printed in USA Today. 

Alcohol is the drug of choice by U.S. teenagers, and 
drunken driving is the leading cause of death in that age 
group. 

According to the American Medical Association 
and the National Council on Alcoholism, at least 25 percent 
of our nation's hospitalized patients suffer from complica- 
tions of alcoholism. 

Over 50 percent of our nation's prison population 
committed their crimes "under the influence." 

Alcoholism causes 500 million lost workdays in our 
nation annually. That amounts to more than $20 billion in 
lost wages, and $35 biUion in reduced productivity. 

Fetal alcohol syndrome is one of the three top 
causes of birth defects. 

A 1987 report toCongressfromHealth and 
Human Services reported that 10 percent of all drinkers 
consume 50 percent of all alcohol sold in America. 

A Washington Post- ABC News poll showed 75 
percent of Americans favoring heavy alcohol taxes to pay for 
health care. 



Student Survey: 

Should the President tax alcohol for health care reform? 








Sean Patterson 
Liberal Arts 

"Yes, Alcohol is a luxury not 
really needed. Some sacrifice 
has to made." 



Karen Northrup 
Nursing 

"No, dgarettes are detrimental 
to everyone. Alcohol isn't 
unless an alcohol problem 
exists." 



Deirdre Sherman 
Foreign Language/Arts 

"Yes, tax it outrageously. If 
you only tax it 25 cents it 
won't make a difference." 



Gregg Martin 
Math/Science 

"No, we don't need anymore 
wasteful spending, there are 
enough taxes not being used 
properly." 



Tom Garvey 
Academy of Life-Long 
Learning 

"Yes, tax cigarettes tax alcohol 
that's what the sin tax is all 
about." 



Both sides of the issue... 



Please tax liquor, so 
we don't get sicker 

by NANCY K. BRENNAN 

Staff Writer 

Taxing liquor in order to pay for Clinton's health care package makes good sense. 
With the exception of tobacco, what other readily available, legal substance is directly and 
indirectly linked to more deaths and raises the cost of health care for all by burdening oiu* 
insurance with needless injuries? Liquor. Booze. Call 'em what you will, but accept the 
fact that in our society, alcohol is a liability. 

I attended a lecture at UMASS/Dartmouth on October 2 1 , given by Jean Kilboume, 
who showed that cigarettes are responsible for approximately 400,000 deaths; alcohol = 
100,000 deaths; and all other drugs = 30,000 deaths per annum. We obviously can't tax 
illegal drugs, because they don't really exist, right? But why not target the drugs which we 
do acknowledge, and which have proven time and time again to be dangerous. 

One of the main reasons there isn't an enormous public outcry against the cigarette 
tax proposal, is that people have come to understand that cigarettes are bad for one's health, 
and that if the price increases, more people will give up smoking, and fewer will start. Duh! 

So why are we having so much difficulty seeing the same affects with alcohol? 
Because the lovely alcohol lobby doesn't want us to, and by God, those folks we have up there 
on the "Hill" don't want them "Booze Fella's" taking back their campaign contributions. 

It's so sad that we are allowing decisions about our lives, our health, our families, 
and our government to be made by wonderful folks like the Tobacco Lobbyists, Liquor 
Lobbyists, and NRA "tough-guys." 

Let's dedicate this holiday season to the lobbyists and our children: Buy little 
Robert, or little Susie, abottleofBourbon,acarton of Lucky'sandanAK47, semi-automatic 
assault weapon. See how long yow child lives in the hands of the Lobbyists. 

Or get on your phone , computer, typewriter, or take outaplainoldpad of paper and 
number two pencil, and write to those silly little men and women in Congress who are Hell- 
bent on being re-elected, but could care less about our health, and teU them they can save 
their campaign contributions, 'cause we ain't votin' fer ya anyhoo! 

As my friend the Conservative Republican said, "We have to take more responsi- 
bility for our actions." 

Well, hey Conservative Republican friend, I say, make it really expensive to act like 
a jerk, and we'll make it much easier to take more responsibility. 

Tax liquor, so we don't get sicker. 



No new taxes! 



by KEVIN MOULTON 

Feature Editor 



People are always going to say that alcoholism is a m^or health problem in this 
country, and they're right it is. However, the fact of the matter is that when someone takes 
a drink they are not causing immediate danger to the person next to them. If they were to 
get behind the wheel of a car and drive, well then that is a different story. If aperson were 
to pull out a cigarette and start to smoke vtith others around them then they are forcing others 
to breath in their polluted air which could cause them harm. 

People who smoke are always going to put those around them at a physical risk, for 
that reason I think an increase in the cigarette tax in order to aid in the payment of the new 
health care package can be justified. I don't feel, however, that President Clinton could in 
any way justify an alcohol tax on the American public. 

Although I rarely drink, I do realize that alcohol plays a major role in otv sociefy 
today. When it comes time to celebrate an occasion, such as a holiday, people ate always 
going to have booze on hand. Granted when a person drinks they are not doing their liver 
or blood pressure any favors, but at the same time they are not forcing the person next to them 
to be affected by their drinking of alcohol. 

Those who become alcoholics do raise ahealth issue and amajorproblem that needs 
to beaddressedin this country, butlthinkthatitismoreapplicableonapersonallevel. While 
they are killing themselves, they are not bringing the rest of society down with them. It just 
doesn't seem right to punish the rest of America, when on occasion they may want to go out 
for a social drink after work with the guys/girls. 

There is no such thing as a casual smoker because no matter where or when they 
do it they are always going to harm something around them, whether it be a person who has 
to consume second hand smoke, or the enviroimient whose ozone is constantly being 
depleted. 

While something does need to be done to curb the amount of drinking done in 
.cociefy, I don't think a tax on the general public is the answer. Instead of placing the direct 
burden on the consiuner, the government should first direct its attention on the industry 
which provides it. 



Woman's Page 



Mainsheet November 4, 1993 page 1 1 



Five questions 
you must asl< your 

gynecologist 



The Independence House: Keeping up the fight 



by NANCY BRENNAN 

Staff Writer 



by KATIE BANIS 

Women's Issues Editor 



The time for your routine gynecological exam approaches. 
In the past you have had no problems. The day of your exam 
you feel anxious about whether will they find anything 
abnormal. If they do, you wonder what you will do. 

Susan Love M.D., director of the University of California, 
Los Angeles (UCLA), Breast Center, and gynecologist 
Constance Bohon M.D., of Columbia Hospital for women in 
Washington, D.C. identified five crucial questions women 
must ask their gynecologist about common gynecological 
conditions which may be discovered during a routine exam. 

The following is their advice as reprinted from a recent 
issue of McCaU's magazine: 

Your Pap smear comes back abnormal 
WHAT TO ASK: "Are the cell changes major?" 

There has been a sharp rise in the mmiber of abnormal Pap- 
test because smears are being classified in a new way that 
identifies minute cervical irregularities (atypias and nuld 



The Independence House celebrated another year 
of helping battered women, and their children, and sexual 
assault survivors all over Cape Cod at their annual luncheon 
on October 15. 

Independence House (IH) is a non-profit agency 
which provides survival resources to women such as a 
twenty-four hour hotline, emergency shelter and support, 
counseling, education, and many other services. According 
to IH literature, the organization's purpose is "assisting 
individuals re-establish lives fi-ee of fear and violence 
through a philosophy of self-help and self-empowerment." 

Sherry Brandsema, ^^^^^^s^^;^;^^^^^ 



dysplasias). These can be caused by infections or irritations help themselves. 



Executive Director oflH, said 
that "Women have a difficult 
time adjusting," after leaving 
an abusive situation. A 
woman may leave and return 
to the situation five or more 
times, because of the emo- 
tional control the abusive 

partner may have over her, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
Ms. Brandsema said. 

However, Ms. Brandsema explained that IH was 
not established to make decisions for women about their 
situations, but to offer women methods by which they can 



in crisis," the report states. 

IH's Rape Crisis Services, in its fifth year, has staff 
and volunteers who meet with victims of rape at local police 
stations, offers support groups, and holds weekly sessions for 
the "Significant others," of rape and sexual assault clients. 
One of the programs at IH is the Domestic Violence 
Prevention Program (DAIP) which offers AGENDA groups 
(AGreement to ENd Domestic Abuse), for men who batter. 
In cooperation with the SherrifFs department, AGENDA 
works to re-educate men about violence. 

According to Bonnie Schermerhom, the Domestic 
Abuse Intervention coordinator, it is up to the men who are 
abusive to ask for help. The AGENDA program works 
closely with 1 2-step programs such as AA and N A, because 
the men need to be free from substance abuse in order to 
1^^^^^^^^^^:^^=:^ profit from the program. 

Ms. Shermerhom said 
that the biggest problem as- 
sociated with the program is 
that some "men come in for 
the wrong reasons. They 
come in to get their partners 
or children back, or to get 
restraining orders lifted." 

Jack . DeMello, 
Barnstable County Sherriff, 



'IH was not established to make 
decisions for women about their 
situations, but to offer women 
methods by which they can help 
themselves.' 



that do not develop into cancer. In fact, a recent study from 
UCLA found that seventy percent of women with mild 
abnormal Paps had normal smears nine months later without 
treatment. 

If your Pap smear shows only minor cell change, Bohon 
recommends a wait-and-see approach. This means getting 
another smear in about three or four months; if the abnormal- 
ity is still present, it should be diagnosed through abiopsy so 
your doctor can determine whether it requires any action. 
"But don't let your doctor lose track of you,"Bohon cautions. 
A lesion that becomes moderate or severe is more likely to 
become cancerous and should be removed by your gynecolo- 
gist without any delay. 

Your mammogram shows calcification 
WHAT TO ASK: "Are the calcification widely scattered 
and in both of the breasts?" 

These calcium deposits are very conmion and are usually 
harmless. "Calcification that are scattered all over your 
breasts are generally benign," Love says. However, if they 
are very small and tightly clustered, they may signal the 
existence of precancerous cells, since these cells often 
calcify when they die. This finding warrants a biopsy- 
especially if the calcifications are new. Also, if it is yoitf first 
mammogram and it shows calcification. Love recommends 
having another X-ray in six months. 

You have growth in your ovary 
WHAT TO ASK: "How large is it?" 

Bohon' s rule of thumb for evaluating an ovarian mass: 



According to the IH's Annual Report for Fiscal '93, 
an immediate response for women's help is available 365 
days per year. "This tremendous undertaking involves 
extreme commitment, sensitivity, and dedication to women 



said that there is a stigma attached to inmates who are 
convicted pedophiles, but that batterers are not similarly 
stigmatized. Not only are sentences too lenient, Mr. DeMello 
said, but [criminal justice agencies] "aren't finding solutions 
to violent problems." 

He explained that there is very little counseling, and 
that the system needs to spend less time on consequences, 
and "be more aggressive in providing solutions." 



Liz Walker asl<s Cape for Support of Jane Doe 



by NANCY BRENNAN 

Staff Writer 



Liz Walker, anchorwoman for WBZ's Eyewitness 
News, traveled to Cape Cod on October 15 to speak at the 
Independence House Annual Meeting, and to gain support 
for the Jane Doe Walk for Women's Safety, which was held 
October 17. Ms. Walker is co-chairwoman, along with 
Marjorie Clapprood, for the Jane Doe Safety Fund, a project 



which supports domestic abuse shelters in Massachusetts. 

Ms. Walker has been involved with Jane Doe for ^^ve a real problem with violence on television. 



scanner regarding domestic violence and murder, and "we 
didn't cover them ... it was as if that death was less important 
than any other ... it's only in the last few years that [domestic 
violence] has been on the front page." 

Ms. Walker said that the mission she wishes to 
accomplish through Jane Doe is to "change the attitudes 
about domestic violence," which she acknowledges will be 
difficult and take a good deal of time. She added that she 
would bet that every family has had the problem somewhere 
within. 

Speaking of her medium, Ms. Walker stated, "I 

She also 



k 



two years, but she said that the issue of domestic violence has expressed how much she disliked programs like "A Current 

always been ofinterest to her. She explained that "nobody Affair," and "Hard Copy." She asked "How dare we tell you 

ever wanted to talk about this before. The most important what's wrong with society ... and then air this junk?" Ms. 

thing is to get it out." Walker was a force behind the removal of these programs 

In her speech before a room of more than 150 gom the WBZ lineup, 
women and men, including State Senator Therese Murray, When asked how she felt about being an 

Barnstable Sheriff, Jack DeMello, and District Attorney anchorperson, and only being able to dedicate a few seconds 

Philip RoUms, Ms. Walker said, "for so long we refiised to to violence in the inner city, Ms. Walker explained that 



Continued on page 12... 



acknowledge that [domestic violence] was even aproblem." 
When she was a reporter in Denver, Colorado 15 years ago, 
she explained that calls would come in over the police 




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"urban violence is so much apart of our fabric it's no big deal 
... you don't get shocked anymore." 

She went on to say that "[we] glorify and condone 
violence," and that we have to change "how we in the media 
look at it." She explained that the media "looks for the 
unusual," and that "kids get kiUed in Roxbury every week- 
end," so the deaths are not unusual. 

Ms. Walker plans to continue in her role to support 
survivors of domestic violence, and said that "I will try to go 
anywhere I can in the Commonwealth to talk about fanuly 
violence." 



Hyannis Office 
62-68 Camp Street 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

778-6700 



New Bedford Office 

12 Brigham Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

999-5757 




Every Thursday from 1 2:30 to 3:00 
room CI 06 Upper Commons 

Students and Faculty Welcome 



page 12 Mainsheet November 4. 1993 SpHng SchcdulC 1994 

State Of the Cape 1994 

Innovative solutions for environmental problems of the 90s 

bv DARLENE MOKRYCKI interference with natural coastal processes has reduced the large stable habitats are "sliced and diced" and wildlife 

CoDV Editor functional values of the Cape's coastal features." They stocks are suffering or even disappearing. Finally they decry 

blame the state wetlands regulations that permit seawall the installation withoutregard to wildlife, of Route 6. 

i'/ate o//*e Cape /9P^ published by the Association for the construction to protect buildings which predate the regula- "This highway fence, perhaps the greatest new 

Preservation of Cape Cod (APCC), and edited by Dana tions.TherearealargenumberofsuchbuildingsontheCape. threat to genetic renewal for Cape upland mammals, was 

Homig, boardmember of the Barnstable Conservation Foun- They question the continual revetting of the shoreline saying installed without any envirotmiental or regulatory scrutiny," 

dation, is a collection of fifteen essays by 20 local experts on that we need to ask ourselvesdo we want to continue with this said the authors. They go on to say that perh^s wildlife will 

issues pertinent to Cape Cod. practice until we build a virtual "Berlin Wall" aroimd find their way over or imder this fence, but that the wildlife 

Topics of discussion range from growth manage- ourselves? The authors blame the widespread responsibility doesn't need yet another obstacle thrown in the way of its 

ment and traffic control to freshwater ponds, wastewater, for enforcement of coastal management laws for their being survival. They go on to plead: "MR. HIGHWAY COMMIS- 

habitat, marine ecosystems and environmental issues along ineffectual. Lisa Hendrickson is an environmental scientist SIGNER, TEAR DGWN THIS WALL." 

with the ethics and economy of these issues and their and marine biologist who has worked for state and federal CCCC Professor BrendaBoleyn and past president 

influence on Cape Cod. governments. Dr. Giese is a coastal geologist at the Woods of the APCC presents "A case for teaching new Civics." Ms. 

Beth Josephson works with alternative wastewater Hole Oceanographic Institution and co-founder of the Center Boleyn feels that education of our youth regarding the "New 

technologies for Gcean Arks International, a nonprofit re- for Coastal Studies in Provincetown. Civics" of the Cape, is essential to inform them and future 

search and educational organization. In her chapter on waste ' generations. "TheNewCivics"toMs. Boleynisanewmore 

water she points out that "most of our septic tanks leach 'fank^ OTI t\\Q hanks of the SCnta^^e enlightened sense ofconnection between preservation of our 

partially freated wastewater directly into the same aquifer ^ _ f b natural resources and municipal and personal affairs. She 

from which we draw our drinking water." The chapter, ISgOOnS WerC llllCQ With plEIltS & hopes to foster through educational efforts "an enviroimien- 

entitled "Wastewater, think of it as simply a misplaced f|„|, rxrckai-ina a nlvn/nnri march* talethic~a sense of conscience, stewardship and responsibil- 

resource," goes on to offer viable suggestions regarding ****» CiedUlig a yiywuuu lildlMi jjy., According to Ms. Boleyn, we need to instill apprecia- 

keeping our water drinkable. Sewering and the composting - tion and respect in our youth with an attitude of fairness and 

of the sludge were, of course, mentioned as alternatives to Mark H. Robinson, the executive director of Cape justice, for the greater good of oui common wealth, 

septic tanks. Cod Conservation trusts, and Eric G. Strauss, an Assistant This book is "must" reading for those of us who are 

She also mentioned Harwich's daring experiments Professor at UMASS, Boston and member of the APCC concerned enough about the future of the C^)e to want to 

of the last few years whereby Ocean Arcs International of board of directors have brought the reader's attention to knowhowwearedoingandwherewearegoingwithrespect 

Falmouth set up an experiment in ecological waste treat- Habitat and Endangered Species, decrying the fact that each to saving the Cape for the enjoyment of fiiture generations, 

ment. They set up a series oftranslucent tanks on the banks day more and more habitat is disappearing. They make clear The "State of the Cq)e Conference" will be held 

oftheseptage lagoons which were filled with plants and fish that on the borders of these habitats is concentrated the Friday and Saturday November 5th and 6th here at CCCC. 

creating an ecologically engineered plywood marsh. In greatest biodiversity because ofthe changing terrain. Frag- The college is subsidizing $10.00 of the $15.00 cost to 

summer on the average of 1200 gallons per day of influent mentation caused by development is occurring at alarming students. For details, see Professor Boleyn in the Science 

was fed to the marsh by pumps deep in the muck of the rates all over the Cape. According to Robinson and Strauss, building ground level, 
lagoon. While critics said that this was not truly representa- 
tive of septage, because in some instances the pimips didn't 

go deep enough, the system nevertheless removed amazing tyu.oc 

amount"! of niitripnt'! anH nthprnol1iitant« frfim thp wa«p "" SECiio* iitLe iimi o«i5 taeoit iHsisucioii Soch f aeiiEjuisitES ss bead 

amoums or nutnenis ana omer pouuiams irom me waste. hu,„i„es .kts/huss cokh, t ^ «>o c . c« ptest = »ssesswe»t tes t pehiis - >t. 

"We have met the enemy and it is us" the chapter by emos-oi sub»ei of mss ccbr t-.ao- »:i5« n 3 lunscen ifrn 

Lisa Hendnckson and Graham S.Giese deals With loss ofthe '^^ rr-oC" iiso ' 'k - - liii; l ' 

beaches of Cape C od. The a uthors contend that "human EiiST^iB cati «nt'UTuof'"ULi'""1-ef ■ :;io« n i f riiinn ,. % sou? iMSo 

. . . Continued from page 11 :«ioi-ti coli «e<c tsiuoi suls til : . Tsi T"! 3 fdench j » soTCT Eaioo 

One that's smaller than two centimeters is probably just EiioPil con. «e«c «stuDT~sSLr ~^:'-: sop'jt ii f l c«lc«GHEii i soicr inBo 

foUicle cyst. These occurwhen the follicle (the sac contain- iiioi-is coCl iie«c istuur stis ":■:' tzjb* t z iiU-iwH i sour eoJOD " #.#% 

ing your egg) continues to grow rather than rupturing and e.Io1-6* coll »Et[ tsTuoi s»lS STT -'TIBp — ii TTliTi toiC T uioo ^^ ^^ 

releasing the egg; they usually disappear within a few ^ __^ _ T^ " 

6 66> J uouauj uioaj/ptoi yyimuj a lew £8101-70 COLL RE«C ISIUOI SIILS ^-.0'-- «:*SP N II 3 IIEHT* L « Hill E HTOO CI " " 

months without treatment. However, any growth that is _ stMt o«tE:ci/i8 stcp:o3/i2 ^^ ji 

i„„„„j ,. J. u J T , ,j £i161-71 coLl (ie«c ISTiJoi suls T1:o3- fiijp li ii T iiEiu* L n m'H i Ofilir ^^m 

largeordoesnt go away may need to be removed. It should st«h o«tE:c3/;i sicp:os/u ^^ ji 

be examined on a «inooTam rioht awav Somp rvctc mau ebioi-oi found in uarimG 9:30-ic:4i> r"5 3 ncciiiii BIT miT ^^» 

oc cxdimnea on a sonogram ngnt away, some cysts may ebioi-oj found in i.«niiic_ io:qo-ic:5o« h » f 3 deuisch soicr ptesi w^ 

disrupttheovary'sfimctionor, very rarely a growth could ebjoj-oS found in wBin'iis it:oo-H:5o« » 5 f "TuctSm iictc pTest '> 

, J J> o- E«t03-0« FOUND IN NPIIIIIG ^ li:0O-1J:5OP N II F S HCCMN NtIO PTESr ^^ 

Oe cancerous. teloi-^o found in miiliNC iioo- 9:1s« r « J cl<>> " nSIC ^iTlSt "" £0^ 

Vnil'ro «nM vnii hoiia nhrn.-.! «..»,».■ EBI03-H FOUND IN WlilTIIIC »;00- e:SO« « li F 3 SHUPI IID S0106 PtEST IC 1 

YQV re tpiq ypu nave tmroij tumgr Eilds-sl found in wsming «: i o- t-.l^t ■ 5 titttvi sens > t b t ^^a 

WHAT TO ASK: "Will it interfere with nrejmanHp*'" e«103-6* found in ubitinc 6:io- 9:30p > 3 puii/ p soi04 ntst 

Jr^, r^r: "'""""»="erewiin pregnancies. E«io3-7o found in iBiiiic— B:oo-fl:«5i TT 3 suTin r r -TiTirr-rrnT 

The latest thinkmg IS that these common uterine growths si««T^o»tE:ci/ie srcp:03/u _ #.^% 

usuaUy can be left alone unless their symptoms- such as "'"1^[n^i;cJ;l;';?.p;owu ''°°'"'^ " ' ^^""^ ^mrr -rnir^ %^ 

excessive bleeding- interfere with a woman's life. But not aiS^IIJ "SS! "i"!""' yVZ-V-^^^ J, \^^. "^T^ O 

all doctors have gotten the message. A recent study from efioo-«j seJf misi i cultiii 6:3o- «:30f s •- rsurr - iicic —mnr x rsiin ^ ^ - 

Rand Corporations in Santa Monica found that about one Enffi-nniiES sies ms i 3:io- tusp r ir 3 PcntcRLtH w\n ^^T 

fourth of umiecessary hysterectomies are performed to Vsu-'A »» s!" \"\ !i V-?v^-V-Z \ » UKiTi" ?»' tno i X 

remove fibroid that didn't warrant the procedure EFio»-t3 fncsspl i <si hup sis 7:00- 9:oop > 2 schniiitz soio7 efioj [11 

. .<-,. J ■ vpioi^uuic. ELIOZ-Ol ELEliENlipf FJEiiCl.^ii lOiOO-ieiSSi KTygF (DEBOiTeapS STZC '"tLlOT * IT 

Assummg your nbroid IS asymptomatic, says Bohon, it ELig*-oi eleneniast ge«i<»i. ii Jjoo- i:5op "_ii f ♦ oebo»e« im nio7 eLio3 ^^ 

probably doesn't require any treatment beyond moderating. elio>-oi elehent.bt sptmsii n luiSS-icllS. hIkSf < oEBotE. pb n!" elibs ^^ 

(Ifitgrowsveryfast,thatcouldmeanyouhaveamalienant "'"-"^ element.bt spinish ii ii:oc-m:so» hthbf < deboieb pb - nHST elTOS ^^ 

. ^ ]. ■^cuijruuuavcailiailguauL E HQt- aj ELEMENTHBl SPANISH II 3:0t- AcSUP TUB « ESPESSCN HI iC EHOS ^^ 

tumor rather than a fibroid -but this occurs very rarely.) If E1111-70 e s l i: basic , 6:6C- s.-uop h n a lOFFir htn e ^^ 

you're planning to get pregnant, however, a symptomless riTo^JT intebheS fbenck n" ' ii:cc-;; 5o« Htnap « cebokeb ps mi2c elJoi ■■■^ 

fibroid can be a concern. Although the vast majority of ^'^"»-*° i"tebneo spanism ii H^S -'r "i'b*^ — *-S£-He>j«o »ijc eljos ^|^ 

women who have fibroid during preenancv do verv well a Hi>o*-pi aovaitceo fbench 9:3p-io:*sa is 3 oEsokEB ns sues elios *" 

_ _, ^, ., , ^, , , ' , ' ' EN10t-0» ENGLISH COPPOSITlOH I »:CU- 8 : SUA HUE 3 PABtlN D HI 05 f«105 

growth that s larger than an orange and close to where a fetus to 

would grow can cause problems. In this case you may need "'"'-'" ""-'^h coHPosifioN i 9:gu- v:soa h > f i pab.in o h1o» e.io3 ^J ^^ 

surgerytoremovejustthefibroid. Butthisprocedureshould """"" '"«lish cohposiuom i 9:oo- »:5oa « ■, f 3 oalich ngic \»\ai ^0\ 

be done only when absolutely necessary, Bohon stresses, en>oi^u« cn.li^h i.6iiPosiriaN 1 ' ia:ao-<(ij:!>si n u f — i palits s ijttj — fitoj ^^^ 

since it can cause scars that can cause infertility. ESiiinR iNeiisH cosposifioa r " ii-mi-Ti'ssoA « b f -x laTifsieiiSiii NCi Estoi- ^^) *° 

Your doctor finds a lump in your breast estopos ihSlIsk coiiposmos i t2:00-s:'.7!!|i * 5 f 3 pmtih moj ibtdt i^ *" 

WHAT TO ASK: "Is it a dominate lump?" — ™-^r» i , _ ^^ »o 

.,.,,, .„ '^ EN101-07 ENGLISH COHPoSi floll I 12:C0- li.HT/ !l k F i iLeWfttltSAl — ITCJ PSVTi ^^^ 

Not all lumps reqmre treatment. They can be caused by ' ao 

ahaimlessswellinginyourbreasttissuethatusuallycomes "'"^s "'"sh co-Pos^noN i ,=1,0- ,:«r * i f 3 »sb «3 "Emi 

andgoeswithyourperiod.(Somedoctoiscallthisfibrocystic "«'-*» f«LisM cohpSsitioh i ^oip-iiisi t « 1 FTTiNiris Mi nm 

disease,butLovesaysthat'samisnomer.) This swelling can Emoi-ti engliIh conpo'siTioin 9ntl-Tt:"«»~ni rrcoSSTur" sores'" "i>»oi ° ssir'stBotifrs osl. 

give breasts a lumpy texture. But a lump that feels distinct SRioi-tj englis-ii coHposrrioH t itwf T?5npT6 f" t Foino t "nrei - TiTtot- ^ »" _ 

from the rest or doesn't change during the course of your gs,Br-*5 iNGLish cohposHmoh • am- u-iw t » - 3 hCp-hee- sskt fSTor - *° 

menstrual cycle should be checked by a breast surgeon . »c 

v^^« ;„ ™;„j .!,.<■ .u . . c ^ ■ EH101-63 ENGLISH CoN^bSlTloN 1 6:30- «:3i)» b mreiiirnn S6ICS itvn 

Keep m mmd that fewer than ten percent of dominate *o 

lumps turn out to be malignant, and having one doesn't J*Tff^*''""-rs" coHPosiTioHi sns-ynB^- ^— s 36H«$oR-ir -SBics-nroi - - ^^ 

necessarilymeanyouneedsurgery. Forexample,byaspitat- Eimn-«5 ENeusH rosresrnoirr - tno- »T3onr~ - -3 UListtrasBT- tm -nun - 

ing the lump a doctor may be able to determine it's only a . fnioi-'o {liecisH toHFbsiiiot* 1 k-.w- «:OI)f h b 3 staff Rnn — fttoj 

cyst. "I think many surgeons are still doing too many surgical "ehtut^^ iNSLTsirioJi^osmoB r — t i:Ci)- th^f in 3 pabiin l~b — Htn e tii03 ""^ 

biopsies on lumps," says Love, "ff your doctor says, 'No EKTTiT4^'»srrfHlB^»^°n^T-^3u^^P r rxuxx^T »fvcc f.io3 

rf,H?fi^°?i 'T' ' "^T"''" ^T,^^^y'' *«" y°" mu . -;, ^huux u.F.MmM i .:3o- ,..m . i .«»u Rrniirrmi -'^ 

should definitely get a second opmion. »o 



Spring Schedule 1994 



Mainsheet November 4, 1993 page 13 



Want a challenge? 

Need help sharpening your writing skills? 
Interested in beefing up your resume? 
Want to see your name In print? 

If you answered yes to any of these questions, sign up for 
Journalism I when you pre-register for spring. We are 
looking for bright, energetic, talented people to be report- 
ers, photographers, darkroom technicians, advertisers, lay- 
out and graphic artists for the MainSheet,.CCCC student 
run newspaper. 

Join us and gain not only job experience and academic 
credit, but also become part of our team and make it your 
home away from home. We hope to see you join are award- 
winning organization so stop by the MainSheet office 
(Upper Commons) or Professor Bill Babner's office N209 
for more information. 

EN U1 1$ offered at 9:30-10:45 on Tuesdays and 

Thursdays or on Wednesdays from 3:30-6:20. 



continued from page 3 

It is very important that you attend registration. If 
for some reason you can not attend, you must go to the 
registrar's office to register before the end of the semester. If 
you do not do this promptly, the popular classes may be full 
and you will have to wait until the rest of the student body is 
done before you can register. 

December 16th is registration for the counter stu- 
dents or for anyone who failed too pre-register, not Decem- 
ber 1 St as stated on the school calendar. Arrive early to avoid 
the rush. Some students arrive as early as 5:30 a.m., so be sure 
to mark your calendar! 



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spring Schedule 1994 



Mainsheet November 4, 1993 page 15 



-iXEXZXCICZKrCXICXKXKXicCK 




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page 16 Mainsheet November 4, 1993 



Back Page 



What's Happening' 



Music and Arts: 

Brown Bag Events 

This year's theme: 

Multiculturalism 

Weds, at noon & Thurs. 

at 12:30 

Tilden Arts Center 

lobby 

Seminars & 
Workshops: 

Awakening the Sacred 
Feminine 

6 week experimental 
class for women who 
want support in bringing 
forth the wild woman 
and honoring the 
goddess within. 
Fridays beginning Oct. 
22nd, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 
sliding scale fee 
For info call Cunjan 
Laborde 563-7575 or 
JoEUen Rice 362-8968 



MBTI TYPE Workshops 

Fall '93 

For more info call 362- 

2131, ext. 452 

Introductory 

workshops: 

Nov. 8,10, & 12,12:00- 

1:00 p.m. L102 

Nov. 30, & Dec. 2, 9:30 - 

11:00 a.m. L102 

Issues Workshops: Tfor 

participants who have taken 

MBTI) 

Novembers, 3:00-4:00 

p.m. L102 Type and 

Couples 

November 16,9:30- 10:30 

a.m. L102 Type and 

Learning 

December 8, 2:00 -3:00 

p.m. L102 Type and 

Careers 

Dealing with stress 



workshop 

weekly meeting, Wed & 
Thurs. 3:15 to 4: 15 
CCCC upper commons 
Classes are free and open to 
all students 

Sponsored by the Adult 
Reentry Center 

To participate in a 
workshop, sign up at the 
Counseling Center, 
Administration Building. 
All sessions are held in the 
Library/Learning Resources 
Center-Conference Room 
(LI 02). 

Contests: 

National College Poetry 
Contest 

Open to all college & 
university students desiring 
to have their poetry 
anthologized. Cash prizes 
will be awarded to the top 



5 poems. Deadline is 
October 31. Contest rules 
available at the MainSheet 
office. 

The National Library of 
Poetry Contest 

To enter send one original 
poem, any subject or style 
to The National Library of 
Poetry, 11419 Cronridge 
Dr„ P.CBox 704-Zl, 
Owings Mills, MD 21 1 17. 
Entries should be 
postmarked by September 
30. New contest opens 
October 1,1993. 

Intramural Sports 
«&: Activities: 

Bodyworks class 

Low impact aerobics, 
step,cardiovascuIar 
conditioning, gutbusters 
and toning, stretching and 
relaxation, nutrition 



information. 

Mon - Wed - Fri, 1 1 to 12 

P.M. in the Gymnasiiun 

Basketball Tues.& 

Thurs. 11-4 

Volleyball Mon. & Fri. 

2-4 

Indoor Soccer Wed. & 

Fri. 12-2 

Floor Hockey Mon. & 

Fri. 2-4 

All sign-up sheets for 
intermural sports are posted 
in the Life Fitness Center. 



Club News: 

Ski Club invites you to 
ski Loon Mtn. 

Nov. 26. $20 for stu- 
dents, S25 for guests. 

Ride & lift included. 
For more info call 

Diane Grondin, ext.393 



Killington, Vermont 
Dec 3-5. $119 in- 
cludes 2 nights lodging, 
lifts, 

and ride. For info 
call Diane Grondin, ext.393 

Gay-Bi Lesbian 
Club 

Tues. 1-2 p.m. CCCC 
Upper Commons, CI 06 

Pot luck dinner. For 
info call ext. 320 



Your activity or event wil 
be published in the 
MainSheets What's Hap- 
pening on a space avaible 
basis. Please send submis- 
sions to the MainSheet in 
the care of Cindy 
SteinmuUer. 



=^ 



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We Support Your Choice. 

Counseling, Housing, and Medical 
Assistance Available. 

Call Carolyn Toll Free in Boston 

1-800-533-4346 

Confidentiality Respected 



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Organizations wanted, to promote the Hotest Spring Break 
Destinations, call the nation's leader. Inter-Campus Pro- 
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state of the 
Cape 

pages 



Movie Review: 
Flesh and Bone 

page 14 



Dead Beat Parents 



page 11 



Student ^^ 
Discounts m^m^ 

page 12 




m SHEET 



Dvember 18, 1993 



Issue no.5 Volume XVI 



Cape Cod Community College West Barnstable, MA 



Distributed REE 



Conference: 1f we can't protect this corner of the 
earth, maybe we can't do it anywhere' 



by DARLENE MOKRYCKI 

Copy Editor 

Setting an "action agenda" for 
the remainder of the decade, 
and working out amongst ourselves 
what the next frontier will be were 
two of the main goals of the State of 
the Cape 1994conferenceheldhere 
last weekend. 

In her opening remarks at the 
Association for the Preservation of 
Cape Cod's 25th Anniversary con- 
ference, Ms. Susan Nickerson, Ex- 
ecutive Director of the APCC, indi- 
cated that the organization was 
proud of the book it had published, 
State of the Cape, 1994 and equated 
the assembl^e to a "living version 
of the book." 

A panel, consisting of Peter 
Ryner, former director of planning for Barnstable, Greg 
Watson, Director of the Eastern Regional Office of the 
Nature Conservancy, George Woodwell of Woods Hole 
Research Center, and Ed McMahon of the American 
Greenways program, was introduced by Ms. Alix Ritchie, 
president of the APCC. 

In her remarks, Ms. Ritchie urged members of the 
association to stand up for their principles, be tough in their 
analyses, and brainstorm to determine the "greater good". 
She defined "stewardship" as "being the keepers." She 
asked, "How seriously do we take this challenge?" 




From left to right : Greg Watson, George Woodwell, Susan 
Nickerson, and Alix Ritchie 

"If we can't protect this comer of the earth maybe we 
can't do it anywhere," lamented Ms. Ritchie. 

Dr. George WoodweU, founder of the Woods Hole Re- 
search Center, opened the discussion. He made a series of 
observations regarding the "public interest vs the private 
interest," stating that "public interest often falls victim to 
private interest." He said that it is reasonable to remind 
govenunent that they represent the public interest. 

Dr. Woodwell also stated that as the rate of growth of the 
area increases, its desirability decreases. He likened our 
practice of zoning, "building-out" the zoning, and then re- 



zoning, to "strip mining." He reminded 
his listeners that the world is "finite." 

We must assure that biotic systems 
remain viable, he urged, and proceeded 
to give some mind boggling numbers of 
how fast our numbers are doubling. 

Saturday morning's agenda was com- 
prised of six different workshops. Topics 
included Natural Resources, Preserva- 
tion Challenges, Waste Dilemmas, Green 
Economy, and Cape Cod Household. 

A buffet lunch was served, and a pre- 
sentation by the Barnstable Public Schools 
System, entitled "Randy Fuscia"was en- 
joyed by all. The skit was followed by a 
speech by Congressman Gerry Studds, a 
long time environmental advocate. 
Studds' remarks were well received by 
the enthusiastic crowd. 

Afternoon sections involved Environ- 
mental Education, Role of Non-Profit 
Groups, Politics and Activism and Media and the Environ- 
ment. 

The broad based agenda brought concerned citizens 
students and association members to the conference in 
impressive numbers. 

The general concordance was one of hope for the 
achievement of a responsible environmental ethic, and for 
success in moderating responsible, planned growth. 




Senate gives funds to fix computers 



by BRIAN FORD 

Staff Writer 

President Kraus and the Student Senate posted $2000 in 
fijnds last week to help restore computers in South Hall . The 
money will go Awards replacing monitors, keyboards, and 
disk-drives which are now worn out or obsolete. 

In a meeting with President Kraus on October 29, 
Student Senators Mark Maxim and John Ahem offered to 
appropriate $1000 from the Senate budget if the college 
would supply the other half. There was an agreement 
reached and the repairs are expected to be completed before 
the start of final exams. 




Should Dr. Kevorkian be in 
prison for the role he plays in 
assisting the terminally ill to 
commit suicide? 




100 students polled 



Students take advantage of Indian Summer on Monday and Tuesday 



page 2 Mainsheet November 18 1993 



Campus News 




/ 



SLEEPY HOLLOW 
CEMETERY 



"fzP 




.>' Vfc»i a(» fe» « ( ii ft i 



Student Eric McCarty poses at Sleepy Hollow, on the recent trip to Concord. 



continued from frontpage 

Some computers have been in use for almost 9 years, as 
fliey break down, their parts are often replaced by salvaged 
parts of scrapped computers. The Student Senate contends 
that these computers desperately need to be updated or 
replaced. 

Students agree that something must be done to update 
the computers. Many students have had trouble with losing 
information ondisks. 

"I think it is a good idea," said Cathy, a student from 

"I think it is a good idea," said 
Cathy, a student from Sagamore. 
"I have been afraid to use the 
room because I have lost so much 
due to faulty drives." 



Sagamore. "Ihave beenafraidtousetheroom because Ihave 
lost so much due to faulty drives." 

Although new computers had been installed in South 
108 last year, students cannot always access the room 
because of classes being held there. Math/science major 
Michele Queenan said, "I think the changes are going to give 
more students access to the computer room." 

Also, these computers feature Intel 486 computer chips 
and 3 1/2" disk-drives; these features are unavailable in the 



older computers. Since most students prefer to use 3 1/2" 
disks, they have problems using the older computers because 

"These drives have trouble copy- 
ing from disk to disk," said Stu- 
dent Senator Ahern. "5 1/4" disks 
aren't very reliable either. The 3 
1/2 '"s are much better." 



they only can suit the less efficient 5 1/4" disk. 

With new disk-drives, the problem will be eliminated. 
They will feature both 3 1/2" and 5 1/4" drives, so they will 
be compatible with the South 108 computers. 

For now, if students wish to use the older computers with 
theirS 1/2" disks, theymustcopythe disk ontoaS 1/4", which 
poses problems with the equipment currently in use. "These 
drives have trouble copying from disk to disk," said Student 
Senator Ahem. "5 1/4" disks aren't very reliable either. The 
3 l/2"'s are much better." 

Although new computers are the students' preference, 
the older ones will serve the purpose just as well with some 
restoration, according to President Kraus. The computers 
need updating, but Mr. Ahem feels that what the students 
really need are new computers. 

"For now, we just want to get as many computers 
running for the students' use as possible," said Mr. Ahem. 



The College Cafeteria: A sure cure for the munchies 



By ADA KELLEY 

Staff Writer 



With the pressures of studying, students are often driven 
to aGarfield -like attack of the munchies and turn to CCCC's 
cafeteria to nourish both mind and body. These cravings and 
pocketbook restrictions usually override concerns about 
nutrition and cholesterol levels . Many students reach for the 
cheapest and least healthy of the foods when nutritious 
choices abound at the campus cafeteria. 

A recent interview with Judy O'Brien, the new manager 
of CCCC's cafeteria, offers 

foodforthought. Ms. O'Brien, ^^^^^^^~~~~^"^~ 
who was recently hired by 
Executive Food Services, Inc. , 
has 20 years of experience in 
kitchen management. She has 
worked at Park Plaza and 
Copley Plaza in Boston. Her 
recent move to the Cape gave 
her a chance to apply her ex- 
perience to a different aspect 
of the business. Working on a 
college campus offers her a chance to work in a different 
atmosphere as she helps the students in the Hotel Manage- 
ment course cater CCCC's staff functions. 

Ms. O'Brien's main duties are to oversee the office 
functions of the cafeteriaand to coordinate food supplies and 
deliveries with the planned menus. She credits the kitchen 
staff with having "more experience in the actual preparation 
of the food and taking pride in uising fresh food for their 
dishes." 



Judy O'Brien and the staff at the 
"Greasy Spoon" are trying their 
best to turn institutionalized food 
into down home cooking without 
raising the prices. 



Irene Hanop who has been with Executive Food Ser- 



vices since the beginning of their three year contract with 
CCCC said that "there is not much you can do to grilled food 
but we only use ' Crisco, ' no fat, no cholesterol vegetable oil 
and we do offer 'egg beaters' now and we have a salad bar." 
She explained that the food is prepared in advance is for those 
who are in ahurry. Mrs. Harrop would prefer to make orders 
up by request. 

Although the Executive Food Service's main office 
prepares the menu, the kitchen staff uses their own home 
recipes. Dina Koubaris contributes her special Greek spin- 
ach pie; and chef, Lawrence Spencer, adds his ideas to the hot 
food menu. Lawrence gained 
^^^^^^^^~~~~^^^~ his experience from The Asa 
Bearse House in Hyannis and 
Sam Diego's. 

Except fw the new items 
on the menu, Mrs. Hairop said 
the prices haven't changed 
since last August and "the spe- 
cials" are not special prices 
but special food items for the 
day. 

Mrs. Harrop explains 
that cleanliness is a major concern in food preparation and 
that is why plastic gloves are used as well as hats, smocks and 
a sink is placed near the grill for frequent wash up. 

Judy O'Brien and the staff at the "Greasy Spoon" are 
trying their best to turn institutionalized food into down 
home cooking without raising the prices. 

The choice is up to the customers. Will it be 
a side of veggies, homemade soup or fries and a greasy 
burger? 



News Briefs 

What's Ahead in Health Care 

A panel discussion "What's Ahead in Health Care" 
will be held by the Cape Cod branch of the American 
Association of University Women at 1:30 pm on Sun- 
day, Nov 21 at the West Dennis Community Center. 

Guests and public are welcome. For fiirther infor- 
mation call Elinor Zeeb at 255-5468 

Women's Basketball scheduled 

The CCCC gym will be open Sundays from 2:30 to 
4:30, Novthru March for women's basketball. Fee is S 
3.00 per player. Call Ms. Ferguson at 362-2131. 

CCCC HiresAdult Education Teacher 

Maureen Cahill of South Chatham has been named 
lead adult basic education teacher at CCCC's Hyannis 
campus. Ms, Cahill earned her B.S. degree at Provi- 
dence College and amaster's degree at Boston Univer- 
sity. 

Three Summer Sessions Planned 

CCCC will offer two additional six week summer 
sessions in 1994. The sessions will run May 3 1 to July 
7 and July 1 1 to August 16. The classes will meet four 
days weekly for 1 10 minutes per class, either from 8 to 
9:50 am or 10 to 11:50 am. 

The seven week session is June 20 to August 4, with 
classes scheduled both day and evening. 

Speakers Bureau Booklet offered 

CCCC is offering a free booklet listing more than 
S3 feculty members and administrators comprising a 
speakers bureauavailablefcH-publicappeaiances. Please 
call 362-2131, ext 390. 

Ethnic Diversity Club to meet 

The Ethnic Diversity Club will meet in the upper 
commons every thursday at 12:30 pm. All are welcome 
to join. The club's goal is to promote sensitivity 
awareness of varying cultures. 



LD students discover 
their potential 

by MARTHA lOVE 

Staff Writer 

Last Thursday a Learning Disability seminar was held 
on "strategies to achieve". Carol-Lynn Cotaoir opened the: 
seminar by introducing Dr. Sommers, the Learning Disabili- 
ties Specialist here at CCCC, along with Joyce Chasson and. 
Chris Thew of the O'Neill Center. 

According to Dr. Sommers, many learning disabled! 
(L.D.) students need to leam by hearing as opposed to thef 
"regular" reading way. L.D. 's make up five percent of all da» 
students. 

The first speaker was Deborah, a first year student here; 
she explained that in school she felt stupid and firistratedi 
Becoming active in drama really helped her because id 
stressed memorizing techniques. Here at the college she has 
the right to use a tutor and to take her tests on a wordi 
processor. She is also granted more time on tests. Shesaidi 
her most valuable resource is Dr. Sommers. 

The seminar's moderator Carol-Lynn Cotooir spoke 
next on what it felt like to do exceedingly well in the woiii 
place, but also to feel like a "beautiful house with no 
furniture". Her self-esteem was exceedingly low. Hereatthe 
college she uses text books on tape and now knows that there 
is life after L.D.. She is also active in the Student Suppoti 
Services. 

Margie, a mother of three children, also found schoa 
frustrating. She had a tutor in high school and here she fet 
"I'll be fine." Her professor also introduced her to Dr 
Sommers. She said, today she feels better than fine. 

Our last student speaker was Jeanette, who summed u] 
what many students often feel,"Ididn't want anyone to know 
I was disabled." She today utilizes talking books, a tutor 
extra time, and anote taker if necessary. She said "never lool 
down on yourself." She added that Tom Cruise and Cher an 
also L.D.'s to emphasize her point. 

. . . Continued on pcige 3 



Cairiftus News 



Mainsheet November 18. 1993 page 3 



TeleCOUrseS spring into 1 994 Roots Resurrected 



by SHERRY AHEARN 

staff Writer 



With enrollment on the incline, so are the 
number of courses otfered through the tele- 
course program each semester. Spring 1994 marks 
the tliird semester that CCCC will offer telecourses. 

For those unfamiliar with the service, telecourses allow 
students to take college credited courses without having to sit 
in the classroom. Attendance at the campus is limited and in 
some cases, non existent. For the disabled, courses can be 
completed entirely through the mail. Other students need 
only to show up on campus to take their final exams. 

Originally designed for the elderly and disabled, these 
courses can be a saving grace to students with work, sched- 



uling or transportation problems. The courses can be viewed 
at designated times and days on the TCI Cablevision System 
which services the towns of Barnstable, Yarmouth, Dermis, 
Harwich and Chatham or videocassettes of the classes may 
be borrowed for up to 3 days from the Radio & Television 
Services office in the library. 

Steve LeClair, Coordinator of Radio & Television Ser- 
vices, runs the telecourse program and is assisted by Beverly 
Mayler, and David Lubelzik, technical assistant. The lec- 
tures are filmed in the TV studio on campus and are then 
edited with pre-recorded footage of concepts related to each 
course. The professors have 
complete control over the editing process. 

The five confirmed courses for Spring '94 are English 
Composition I, English Composition U, General Psychol- 
ogy, Child Psychology and Introduction to Business. Regis- 
tration and tuition are the same as with any other course. 



by CHARLENE WALLACE 

Club Secretary 





Efforts to recycle on campus reachi a lovy^ in the Science building. 



LD Stud6ntS continued frontpage 2 

Martha Armster, a criminal justice graduate with hon- 
ors, felt that one must accept L.D. and then go on from there. 
She spoke about the frustrations she has in her work as 
dealing with juveniles as well as their sadness and anger. The 
good part is that she can relate to them. There aren't many 
who are able to do that at the Barnstable House of Correction. 

The seminar was then opened up for questions. Repeat- 
ing courses was a major concern. Many L.D.'s repeat 
courses. Algebra is a prime example. It is wiser also to take 
only two or three courses as it does take longer for us to 
integrate what have read or heard. 

Carol-Lynn read at the end of the seminar, "This pro- 
gram is to raise the awareness of the college community and 
high school students of what it is like being a learning 
disabled in college and that college L.D.'s are bright, ca- 
pable, hardworking individuals that succeed if given the 
proper chance." 



Anyone who walked into the middle of this seminar 
wouldhave observedapanelof extremely articulate and well 
poised individuals. There was a feeling of pride emanating 
from them. As Deborah's poem "AU About Me" states "The 
brightness abounds around 

me,lifluigmeuptoanewIevelofbeing. Hope and h^piness 
have taken my hand and are guiding me towards new 
possibilities. Cautiously I take a step. I know not of this new 
world and I am overwhelmed by its openness. There doesn't 
seem to be any walls, any ceiling, or floor, only vast space. 
Should I have wings I'd fear r d fly, and yet I feel apart of this 
space. That which surrounds me is a part of me. I rejoice in 
thQ.a2lsnd<g-feat is mine." 



The Ethnic Diversity Club has resurrected once again. 
Our first meeting was held Nov, 4th, 1993 from 12:30to 1:45. 
The Ethnic Diversity Club is an organization that is open to 
people from all waUcs of life who wish to share the history of 
their ethnic background, also welcome are those who wish 
to educate themselves about other cultures. 

The primary goal of the group is to help create an 
environment here at CCCC which is sensitive to all ethnic 
groups. 

'we hope to support, empower and 
commit students to have pride in 
their ethnic heritages with the in- 
tention of helping to increase the 
enrollment' 

Our objectives are to make people aware of ethnic differ- 
ences that we share as well as to educate and increase 
awareness of ethnicity. We hope to discourage the use of 
negative stereotypes that have been formed regarding par- 
ticular social group memberships. 

Finally, we hope to support, empower and commit stu- 
dents to have pride in their ethnic heritages with the intention 
of helping to increase the emolhnent and retention rates of 
students from diverse backgrounds here at CCCC. 

Our standing officers presently are as follows: Pam 
Humphrey, President, Charlene Wallace, Secretary and 
Aljamien Islam, Treasurer. 

The Diversity Club meets every Thursday at 12:30 pm. 
on the second floor of the commons building. 
Please join us. 

Unity 

What is Unity? 

Unity is when we unite as a people and not as 

separated individuals. 

It is when we focus on mankind and not on the race 

of that man. 

Unity is when we strive with one mind, heart and 

spirit, to bring goodwill to all and peace on earth. 

It is when we lift up and not tear down our brother 

or our sister. 

Unity to me is when I see my brother or my sister in 

need, to lend them a hand and to be a friend when 

all others have forsaken. 

This is imity to me 



I 



Minut;es 
MAX 

FOUR SHORT PLAYS 

taken from the Actor's Theatre of Louisville 

presented by the 
Rehearsal & Performance Class 

directed by 
Nancy Willets 

NOVEMBER 19, 20 • 8:00p.m. 

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Studio Theatre 




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■ 



page 4 Hainsbeet November 18, 1993 



Opinion 



Editor answers racism charges 



by TOM REDMOND 

Campus News Editor 



A recent editorial of mine questioned the special gam- 
bling franchises allotted the Indians. I'm against these 
tranchises. The examination of this issue fostered com- 
plaints of racism. The Affirmative Action Committee held 
a meeting and there were editorials with much critical 
commentary. 

The word racism is thrown around these days like so 
much confetti that one can hardly see the parade of issues. 
There is a hue and cry for more diversity on campus. I say 
welcome to the world of diversity where critical and dissent- 
ing opinion breathes free! It is a sad commentary when such 
earnest intellectuals must cower behind the red flag of racism 
to avoid the critical and sensitive issues of the day. 

Are the Indians above reproach? Is the subject of 
gambling taboo? 

What a farce! This is a classic case of overkill and 
yellow journalism. My article taken on its own merits is not 
racist. What made it racist were the actions of one CHARLES 
F. THIBODEAU, managing editor of the opinion page. Mr. 
Thibodeau had a conflict of interest and pursued his own 
private agenda. 

Mr. Thibodeau wrote an editorial entitled "I Apolo- 
gize;" as well he should! He should apologize to the 
Affirmative Action Committee and minorities everywhere 
for his irresponsible and manipulative behavior. 

Mr. Thibodeau manufactured this incident by inserting 
inflammatory pullquotes which mislead and confiise the 
truth. They do not reflect the true nature of my article or me 
for that matter. Anyone who knows me and my academic 
record understands that I have far better literary judgment 
than that. 

I might also note the "photo not available black box," as 
a further attempt to discredit me. 

Prior to publication Mr. Thibodeau and colleagues felt 
compelled to alert certain interested parties; the A.A.C., of 
which he is a member, the Indian Tribal Council, and Ms. 
"Talking Eyes" Black, the student who lodged the com- 
plaint. 

This article was published this way without my consent. 
Evidently Mr. Thibodeau lacks the intellect and courage for 
an open debate and must resort (o subterfuge. 

This lack of editorial objectivity is a blatant betrayal of 
this newspaper's trust! These actions were pursued by Mr. 
Thibodeau to purposely fan the flames of controversy. 

Having Charles Thibodeau on the Affirmative Action 



Committee is the equivalent of having an arsonist on the fire 
department. This insidious conduct is a form of backhanded 
racism and very dangerous. 

I stand by the main tenets of my article. They clearly 
state that the Indians should have no more right than anyone 
else to petition the state foragambling franchise, particularly 
in light of the fact that they do not pay state taxes on these 
enterprises. They do not. I cite Title 25, sec. 471 of the 
Federal Code. 

I also do not believe in special entitlements as they are 
a poor substitute for real justice. They serve only to stigma- 
tize a segment of the population and fragment society. 

I have listened sincerely spellbound and frozen in si- 
lence as members of a local tribe mesmerized me with a 
recounting of their "trail of tears." It is impossible to 
reconcile that these atrocities were committed against a 
people who believe they were put on this earth to preserve 
and protect nature. I am deeply moved by both their 
eloquence and passion. 

It is at this juncture, however, where my intellect 
interrupts my heart. It begs the question. What's your point? 
What does yesterdays news have to do with gambling 
casinos? 

I do not, like some more impressionable people, suffer 
a guilt complex over the confluence of historical events. 
Employing guilt to cloud the issues is the tactic of a used car 
salesman. 

I realize that there were grave injustices committed 
against the indigenous people. There are serious grievances 
that exist today. I condone neither. However, I fail to see 
how gambling casinos will redress these issues. 

Does one expect gambling casinos to be a panacea for 
the world's social ills? Are we to put one armed bandits in 
Bosnia? Should we feed the children of Somalia poker 
chips? Gambling does nothing but victimize and corrupt. 

What about all the "relations" that cohabit gambling; 
organized crime, money laundering, prostitution, drug abuse, 
and alcoholism. Do we really need this type of fatma in our 
natural preserve? 

The day gambling casinos become the moral arbitrator 
of justice will be the day Sitting Bull stands up! 

Perhaps some Great Sachem will ponder this dichotomy. 
Why would such a noble race of men, whose people were so ! 
decimated by the white man's diseases, choose to infecti 
themselves with yet another white man's disease in order to 
perpetuate their culture? 

This is a fate of the darkest irony. 



A society which lies in the middle of the road 



by KEVIN MOULTON 

Features Editor 



Should I go and try to lie down in the middle of 
Mass. Avenue at the begiiming of rush hour traffic, or 
shouldn't I? If I started to hear this question running aroimd 
in my head after seeing a movie, I don't think my first stop 
would be Mass. Ave., but instead Mass General. 

Over the last month two teenagers have died as a 
result of trying to imitate a _^,,^^^^^^^,^^^^ 
scene from the movie, ThePro- 
gram, in which star members 
of the football team lie down in 
the middle of a crowded free- 
way to prove their testosterone 
level. At the same time MTV is 
taking seriousheat fortheir pop- 
ular cartoon Beavis and Butt- 
Head, due to a recent incident 
inwhicha five-year old boy set ^^^^^^^^^^^^^= 
fire to his trailer and in the 

process killed his two-year old sister. With each instance the 
debate arises over whether or not shows such as these should 
be allowed to air due to the influence they have on the youth 
in America. 

In an attempt to ease the preassure, producers from 
both shows have emitted the scenes causing controversy, but 
let's face it the damage is aheady done. The scene from The 
Program has been smeared across the American tube ever 



was detrimental to my learning process, they would sit down 
with me and explain to me what was wrong with the show. No 
matter what they said, the most important point they always 
stressed was that it was "just a TV show", which meant that 
it was O.K. to watch it but that as soon as the television was 
tinned off so was the concept of the show in my mind. A 
parent who just walks into aroom and says,"I don't want you 
watching that show", or just turns the TV off isn't meeting 
their responsibility to their child in an acceptable manner. 
One way or another the child WILL watch the show, whether 
^^^^^::=^;;^^^^^^^^ it be at a friends house or 
when you're not around. Par- 
ents who lay the blame on the 
Mass Media are lazy parents, 
who need to stop pointing the 
finger at others and look in 
the mirror and ask themselves 
if they are doing everything 
they possibly can to raise well- 
^^^^__^^^^^^^^___ informed children who know 

the difference between right 

and wrong. 
Granted a parent cannot hold their child's hand 
everywhere they go, but if they gave their children guidance 
from their begiiming then maybe we wouldn't have to worry 
about a kid having enough common sense to stay out of the ! 
middle of the road. 

Before each episode of Beavis and Butt-Head, a 
warning is flashed which for simplicity states,"This is a 
cartoon. Do not try this stuff at home." And that's all it is, a 
cartoon, which if taught to watch in the right context and 



'the most important point they always 
stressed was that it was "just a TV 
show", which meant that it was O.K. to 
watch it but that as soon as the televi- 
sion was turned off so was the concept 
of the show in my mind.' 




Editorial Staff 

Sheila Johnson 
Michele Queenan 
Kevin Moulton 
Bryan Russell 
David Whitmore 
Jack Higgins 
Tom Redmond 
Katie Banis 
Vincent Raimo 
Charles Thibodeau 
Cindy Steinmueller 
Darlene Mokrycki 
Melissa Phaeneuf 



William Babner 



Contributors 



Sherry Aheam 
Michele Auclair 
Laurel Bloom 
Nancy Brennan 
Jon Coutino 
Sarah Curley 
Jennifer Dixon 
Brian Ford 



Editor in chief 

Focus 

Features 

Alts/Photos 

Photos 

Entertainment 

Campus News/ 

Women's Issues 

Graphics 

Editorial 

Campus Life 

Copy 

Advertising 

Faculty Advisor 

Amy Paine-Gold 

Ada Kelly 

Robert Koenig 

TerriLadd 

Martha Love 

Erin Rose 

Jayme Wood 



The MainSheet is a member of 

NECNA 

(New England Collegiate 

Newspaper Association) 



Student activity fee should nott 
fund equiptment repair 
Letter to the Editor 



since the deaths of the boys, and every trendy teenager across 

the country is echoing the words of Beavis at the slightest taken for what it's worth, it can be funny. Parents need to 

spark from a lighter. remember that it is not up to TV executives sitting behind a 

While I feel for the families who have lost their desk in Manhattan to raise your kids. Every parent should 

loved ones, at the same time I fault them for the fragedies look at the opportunity to raise a child as an honor and a 

whichhave occurred and not MTV or Disney( they produced privilege, and should make every effort to raise that child in 

The Program). While growing up my parents always tried a successftd manner. Don't just leave the kids in the middle 

their hardest to instill the concept of right and wrong into my of the road frying to figure out the do's and don'ts of society 

head. If I was watching a television program which they felt on their own, give them a big push in the right direction. 



To the Editor: 

During my time on the Student Senate, I have beei' 
exposed to many issues concerning the state of this coUeg 
and the welfare of its students. The Senate deals with studen 
activities, concerns, and the difficult task of voting to alio 
cate money to causes we feel are worthy. This money come 
from the student activities fee each student is required to pa; 
in addition to their tuition. Believe me, it is not easy to maki 
decisions regarding money that comes from students. 

Just recently, we voted to allocate $ 1,000 to the comt 
puter lab to purchase 10 new disc drives. Soon after our vote( 
President Kraus agreed to match our $ 1.000. Iwasshocket I 
that the Student Senate, an organization set up for studeni 
activities and needs, had been asked to pay for disc drive 
for the computer lab. It seems to me that our college, whict 
is considering the purchase of a building in Hyannis, should 
have $1,000 to improve the computer lab. One thousand 
dollars is pin money compared to the five million doUa 
proposed expenditure for the purchase of the building: 
Something is wrong with this picture. 

While some people at this college are looking to expano 
outside of our Barstable campus, I see this as missing the l| 
target. There is so much that needs to be done here on oui 
existing campus, that I cannot begin to comprehend the ide; 
of expansion. How can we begin to focus our attention anci 
finances somewhere else?? TTie disc drives in the computer | 
lab are only one example of academic needs that are not 
being met here. The theater department, die library, and oui 
campus newspaper , are just a few areas in need of funding 
The Student Senate cannot pay for all of these things, as w< 
have a limited budget, not to mention the fact that the it i.', 
not the resposibility of Student Senate to fund equiptmem 
repairs and upgrades with student funds. 

The most disheartening realization to me, is that mos 
students do not voice their opinion about where theu- mone] 
is and will be going. Every student has the power to asl 
questions, voice their opinions and influence importani 
decisions. If the students do not stand up for what thej 
support, or concern themselves with what they do not sup 
port, important decisions will be made for them. There m 
many serious problems at this college that need to b< 
addressed by the students. Every student here has an equa 
say as to where our money is spent. Please remember that 
Now is the time to get involved and have a say as to when 
your hard-earned money is bemg spent. When your monej 
has ah-eady been channeled towards projects that you do noi 
support, it may be to late!!! 

Student Senator Shira Goldberg 



Letters 



Mainsheet November 18, 1993 page 5 



Nauset grad witnessed students smoking pot in class 



Letter to ttie Editor 



'o the Editor: 

In a recent MainSheet editorial Charles Thibedeau 
iTote about the "Fleet." I was not surprised at all by this 
ecause I am a Nauset graduate. 

I had the privilege of attending three different high 
chools in three different cities and countries. Nauset had the 
rorst and most obvious drug, alcohol, and cigarette prob- 
3ms. It is so obvious that even a kindergartner would know. 
a my senior year, which is the only year I attended high 
chool at Nauset, I was in a science class where the students 
penly smoked marijuana and drank alcohol. The question 
ou might be asking yourselves, is did the teacher do 
nything? The answer is no. He did squat. 

Parents might be saying, well these are students that are 
rom the bottom of the barrel. My reply is: HELL NO, these 
re your straight A and B students. They are demonstrating 
} other students that they can abuse drugs, alcohol and 
igaretts and remain in good standing in the school. These 
tudents who are supposed to be "role models" because of 
leir exemplary grades, set a poor example for those impres- 
ionable students who are following in their footsteps. Pai- 
nts tend to ignore this type of misconduct if the student isa 
rom a lower class— thinking "this can't happen to my son or 
aughter." 

How can these things go on without anyone reporting it? 
have personal knowledge that it has been reported but no 
ne is honestly willing to do anything about it. 

Start at the beginning of your child's day, on the busses. 
>ur tax doUarsare usedto fund the busses. Children use 
rugs, alcohol, and cigarettes on the busses. 

I suggest that we fire those bus drivers who can not 
iscipline these children (this includes those bus drivers who 



warn the children to duck down so that no one will see them .) 
Use parents to take turns monitoring the students on the bus. 

Next, check each student's locker for illegal drugs. 
This can easily be done by having police dogs sniff the 
lockers monthly while children are in class and unsuspect- 
ing. 

Children are hiding their drugs in such places you 



I would just like to bring to 
your attention the fact that 54 
percent of children living in non- 
city areas use and abuse mari- 
juana. 



would never suspect, like the lifesaver holes containers. 
Alcohol is kept in sports bottles or water containers. Walk 
into the rest room during, before, or after school and you 
would think by the odor that it is the smoking room, not the 
bathroom. 

Next, have each teacher tested for drug use; include the 
administration. 

Administrators can't moniter your child after school, 
that is up to you as a parent. 

Here are some suggestions: 

(1) Ask your child where they are going, who they will 
be with, what time they wiU be back, and make sure they have 
money to call you if they get into a situation which they can 
not handle. 



(2) Emphasize communication. It seems that children 
are no longer talking to their parents with respect and 
sincerity. I am always able to talk to my parents about any 
topic. 

(3) Ask your children questions. How was their school 
day, or date, or friends. 

(4) Communicate with parents of your children' s friends. 
Validate that there is a permissible gathering in their home. 
If there are doubts about your children's friends, decisions, 
and absence tell them so. Talk to your child. If the child 
won't give you a straight answer or you distrust your child's 
answer, tell them so. Be honest. 

(5) Listen. Don't do all of the talking. Don't just hear 
what your child is saying, try to understand their feelings. 

(6) Ask questions. It will show you care and are inter- 
ested in what your child is conveying to you. 

(7) Teach your child that you care about them and their 
health. Smoking, drugs, and alcohol all cause serious health 
problems. Second hand smoke and driving drunk influence 
us all. 

Nauset students are openly asked if they would like to 
attend a pot party. 

Nancy Reagan was right in teaching our children to just 
say no. 

What happened to teaching our children that it is alright 
to be different? What about teaching our children of the 
power of peer pressure? 

According to "partnership for a drug free America, 54 
percent of children living in non city areas use marijuana. 

If you would like more information on teaching your 
children about drugs call them at 1-800-624-0100. 

Katie Bairis 



Wellfleet is no different than any other town 



Letter to the Editor 



ro the Editor: 

As a parent of a Wellfleet teen, I feel compelled to 
respond to Charles Thibodeau's article of Oct. 7th, ("A 
Groovy Place to Hang").While I appreciate the effort Mr. 
Ihibodeau makes to address an ongoing problem of what to 
do about our restless youths, I found the tone of his article to 
be too negative and a bit too sensational for my taste-blown 
aut of proportion I think. 

I dropped in unexpectedly at two of the types of parties 
lie refers to, knowing my own teen would be there, and I 
found no porno, no trippers, nothing outrageous. What I 
found was a bunch of semi-dazed kids listening to too-loud 
music and trying to mimic the adults they know by drinking 
alcohol (sure, it' s a drug, but they know it' s the one condoned 
by society). 

We all try to do our best, as parents, and it never seems 
to be enough. But to blame the problem on one town, 
[Wellfleet, is to reinforce a very negative stereotype that, 
jonfortunately, puts Wellfleet's kids at a huge social disad- 
Ivantage vnthin the Nauset region. (Mr. Thibodeau and I both 
iiave sons who live in Wellfleet so he should know better.) 
Wellfleet is no different than Orleans, Eastham, or Brewster, 
jl am told, when it comes to scoring liquor, etc. In fact, the 
one time I encountered two small half-kegs of beer at aparty 
Hiy son decided to spontaneously host, I had the hcense plate 
•)f the keg owner traced to a Brewster parent. But much of 
fhis is beside the point: These kids party down here on the 
pape because it's always been this way-it's what their 



parents did and probably their parents before them. And 
there aren't many alternatives offered. 

Wellfleet has responded by changing the Recreation 
Director's position from a part-time position to a full-time 
job. But it will take more than one person to make a change. 
I said this some ten or twelve years ago when I applied for the 
Rec. Director's position. Though I wasn't hired, I wouldn't 
have accepted the job as it stood. I'd offered to take apay cut 
and to share a co-directorship at that time because I felt, and 
still feel, the job is too big for one person. We will simply 
make that one person our scapegoat when he doesn't turn out 
to be Super Man. And, stiU, the problem is ours. If we don't 
like it we ought to try harder to change it-not to criticize it 
but to CHANGE it. How about a drop-in center? Whatever 
happened to live bands? With real artists the kids could focus 
on instead of the canned muzac they tune out to now? 

One more thing: Mr. Thibodeau mentioned that a lot of 
kids are smoking these days. This doesn't surprise me with 
the Joe Camel campaign in the faces. But do we realize how 
much it's in our faces as well? Camel Cigarettes have been 
riding the N.Y. Times' Bestseller List for many weeks now 
in the form of its nimiber one book, Bridges of Madison 
County (there were so many Camels in it I started to see 
humps); and e\.en Mary Chapin-Carpenter features the "two 
syllable cigarette" in her hit song "I Feel Lucky." Want your 
kids to quit? Wake up and smell the smoke. Teach them how 
to say no. Boycott. Write letters. Petition. Act. 

From a parent-activist, 
Judy Wallace 



IWe need to recognize our allies 



Letter to the Editor 



the Editor: 

If you are a woman, person of color, Jewish, homosexual, 
erson with a disability, or of aboriginal decent and were 
iffended and want to take issue with the article Charles 
"hibodeau wrote and published in the MainSheet on Novem- 
er 4, 1993 titled, "I would Like To Apologize," you need to 
eriously re-think your position and examine your knowl- 
dge base. 

It seems that we can deny and ignore words used in the 
rticle such as swamp nigger, queer, — t, kike, and mother - 
— ^r when spoken amongst private groups or between indi- 
iduals and not be offended or not respond if offended. 
Iiese terms are used by people (oh no, not me!) all the time 
nd we as a society rationalize their use in many different 



ways(example:he/shewasangry,theywerejustjoking,etc.) 
Yet when words of this nature are written and used to make 
a point, (a just point, may I add) or to educate or confront 
issues, we get offended. 

Charles is a man who belongs to the "White Christian Male 
Establishment," as he puts it, yet he has enough depth, 
sensitivity and courage to publicly challenge the status quo. 
Charles confronts racist, sexist and other oppressive acts and 
behavior when they need to be confronted. He advocates for 
justice, equality and equity for all oppressed groups. 

It is unfortunate that he himself carries such a burden that 
he feels he must apologize for his social group. I wish that 
there were more men who had his integrity. 

Charles thank you for being visible and accessible. There 
are some of us who know who our allies are. 

Roseanna Pena-Warfield 



To the Editor: 

1 am appalled at some of the students attending this 
coUege who do not prepare themselves for daily classroom 
activities. Classmates in my Foundations in Writing, Basic 
Math, and Reading and Study Skills classes Arrive daily 
without doing homework assignments. 

Also, they do not have notebooks. Calculators for 
math, and last of all the their required book for the class. This 
is not only an uncomfortable situation for the teacher, but for 

'those students who do constantly 
arrive late and unprepared for 
class without a proper excuse 
should receive a failed grade ...' 

the students who do ariive prepared for class. 

Most students have independent excuses as to why 
they do not arrive at school on time. One student's car had 
broken down while driving to college. Most times, 
however,the excuse is unbelievable; for example, one stu- 
dent stopped at Burger King for lunch even though the drive 
through is ten cars long; their classesstartsat 12:00p.m.; and 
their watch shows the time of 12:15. 

To solve this problem, I would suggest that those 
students who do constantly arrive late and unprepared for 
class without a proper excuse should receive a failed grade 
for the class. A written notice should be sent to the student 
in regards to the problem. If the student receives financial 
aid, that student should not receive financial aid for the next 
semester. It's time for you students of CCCC to wake up and 
grow up. 

Regina Coleho 

Foundation in Writing student 

Letters Policy 

Letters must include the writer's name in 
order to be published. MainSheet reserves 
the right to edit to suit length and style re- 
quirements. We regret that we cannot ac- 
cept poetry. 

Correction 
The dance performance, "The Dance 
of Life" will be held on December 3rd 
r and 4th, instead of the dates listed in 
the last issue. The MainSheet apolo- 
gizes for any inconvience. 



lUHfllHia 



page 6 Mainaheet November 18, 1993 



Political correctness be damned, 

the current wave of oversensltlvity is ridiculous 



by DARLENE MOKRYCKI 

Copy Editor 



Last week I was in the company of some lesbian 
acquaintances of mine one of whom happens also to be 
Jewish. 

The conversation revolved around a dilemma we 
had in the MainSheet office one day, regarding gays and 



'No, I'm not a proponent of eth- 
nic slurs, but to be ridiculously 
oversensitive to the point where 
one must be afraid to say any- 
thing at all, is also ridiculous. ' 



lesbians: Is "gays and lesbians" a redundancy? 

While in politically correct Ungo it is not, my 
lesbian fiiend has been of that persuasion long enough to 
remember when it was aredundancy, and I also must confess 
to being of an age old enough to remember the day when 
lesbians were gay. Iremember when gays were "queer," and 
when "queer" was derogatory. 

I have finally lived long enough to see it come 
around full circle to where "queer" is politically 
coirect(according to my lesbian acquaintance, who, after I 
told her that I was writing this article told me in no uncertain 
terms that she no longer wanted to be called a fiiend). 

Now the rub. My acquaintance who happens to be 
extremely sensitive to such issues, told me that there was a 
team in Salem called the "Witches." She said that the 
opposing team had held arally the theme of which was "Bum 
the Witches." The phrase, while I must confess I know very 
little about nor do I know anyone who is into witchcraft, I did 
not and could not find offensive. 

I told her that, in my opinion, if they call their team 
the "witches" they would have to be prepared to deal with 
people who want to "bum the witches." To which she 
retorted what if they said "Gas the Heebes?" While I must 
confess I was momentarily taken aback by the language, I 
replied that I would feel the same about a team who called 
themselves the "Heebes." This conversation does, of course, 
border on the ridiculous. It was phraseology used only to 
make a point. 

There is more than one definition and more than one 



correct usage of the word "bum." Same goes for the verb 
"gas." 

Now my (fiiend no longer) is up in arms over my 
insensitivity. She claims that I will hurt people who are still 
alive and who lived through the holocaust by printing this 
article, that I will be accused of being anti semetic. 

I say enough! Enough of this politically correct 
bullshit. 

She then asked me to use "scalp the Indians" as an 
example for my story, rather than "gas the Heebes." 

Excuuuuse me! I, myself can see no difference 
between the two save the ethnicity of choice. 

I have Native American blood (without tribal ties)- 
-my great grandmother was fidl blooded Cree. My father 
remained in contact with tribal affiliates throughout his life- 
-I did not. 

I am not offended by an opposing team's use of the 
play on words "scalp the Indians." I must confess that I have 
never "walked a mile in the moccasins" of a Holocaust 
survivor; no, I've never even spoken to one. But, as a 
Catholic, my particular ethnic group has been a target of the 
Klu Klux Klan. Other ancestors have been wronged, also. 
Those Indians who were given smallpox laden blankets to 
warm them in winter died too. No, neither group had peoples 
exterminated in niunbers as great as millions, but each life 
was the only life its owner had to give. 

"Minutemen" doesn't particularly offend me ei- 
ther. Nor do the "Browns,"the "Warriors" or the "Colts 
kicking the Buccaneers." 

I am not "black," which is politically incorrect 
today nor am I a person "of color,"which is apparently 
today's politically correct phraseology. 

"Colored people" is incorrect, as are 
"Negro,""Nigger" and even I must confess as I search my 
memory it goes back to the days of the particularly offensive 
"tar baby." 

And who of my approximate age, has been spared 
listening to "Eenie meenie miney Moe; catch a nigger by the 
toe?" 

I'm not so sure the words are as offensive in 
themselves as the reasons for them and the political times and 
conditions during which they were coined. Many black 
comedians on HBO today use "nigger" every other sentence. 

I'm not Jewish, nor Irish nor Portuguese, nor Asian, 
but I've known people who were called "Kikes," and"Micks," 
and "Spies" and "Gooks,"in my day. None of whom have I 
hated because of their differences from me. Actually, it was 
these very differences which attractedme to them. Ethnicity 
has always been of great interest to me. 

I do have some English, some Italian, some French, 



some Native American ancestors, and have heard every 
Wop, Ginney, Mafia, Frog, Anglo, and Indian joke ever 
invented. Offended? of course when one's people are 
attacked or ridiculed in this manner one is offended. 

No, I'm not a proponent of ethnic slurs, but to be 
ridiculously oversensitive to the point where one must be 
afiaid to say anything at all, is also ridiculous. 

Lest anyone call me insensitive to discrimination, 
please understand that I have lived through sexual harass- 
ment and discrimination as will fill and as wrong as any of the 
people who have cases before the courts today. 

Harassment, for example, where I was bluntly told 
by the owner of Dirats testing lab in Westfield, Ma. after 
working in United Technologies Materials Control Lab for 
eight years: "I don't hire woinen." These were words that I 
could have made him eat had I chosen to pursue the matter. . 
But which I didn't because I realized that even if I won, I'd 
lose. He would make it so miserable for me that I'd hate 
myself for winning. 

Once back in the late 60's, I was punched by my 
Supervisor, a 245 lb 6 foot tall male at Pratt and Whitaey. 
This was a matter uiiich I did pursue somewhat. It was 



•What's "Wo?" That is what the 
"politically correct" feminist 
might call a woman.' 



Student feels Halloween contest 
judging unfair 



Letter to the Editor 



Jo the Editor: 

Perhaps some of you remember me. I'm the man who 
continued to wear his Halloween costume after Hallow- 
een was over. (I was the medieval woodsman.) I did this 
in protest regarding the shoddy way the Halloween 
costume judging was done. No, I'm not complaining 
because I didn't win. I'm complaining because the 
judging was over before I could even get there to enter. 

Costumejudging was supposed to be from 12:30-1:30 
p.m. I've got the sign that says so, to prove it. I tutor in 
the SSSP from 11:00 - 1:00 p.m. No problem right? 
Wrong II went over to the cafeteria and spike to someone 
to let them know I wouldn't be there until 1:00 p.m. She 
said that would be fine. But, when I got there, I found out 
that the judging had been over for ten minutes. I'm upset 
because some people in this school are continually 
complaining that there's not enough student involve- 
ment. Then, some of these same people prevent students 
from getting involved because they don't follow their 
own guidelines. How can people get involved when the 
rules keep changiug? Maybe the people who decided 
that a 20 minute judging equals a 60 minute judging are 
the same people complaining that the math requirements 
are too difficult. 

Don't get me wroi^. I'm not running around crying 
"poor mouth" because of a contest. (Even though I could 
have used the money and think I could have won 




resolved after mudi investigation by giving me a raise and 
promotion to a level EQUAL to that of the 22 men in the 
department. (I was the only woman and the only grade 35 in 
the lab. The men were grade 37's.) 

The perpetrator's job was saved only by some 
generosity which arose from within me as I tefiised to tell 
them which supervisor had accosted me. He had begged me 
in the name of his wife and kids not to tell them who did it. 
I agreed, only to find out years later that I had been black- 
balled by him in an attempt to get ajob in atesting lab where 
the perpetrator was the company's liaison with P&WA. 

So much for fair play. 

I was also accosted by one sleazy engineer who used; 
to push his genitals into the thigh, butt or any other body part 
of any woman he chose to each time he needed to talk to one 
of them. 

When he did this to a fiiend of mine, and I men- 
tioned it to her she told me he was harmless. I wonder if his 
wife and six kids thought so. Ithoughthewasdisgusting. Let 
it suffice to say I did see him get his "just desserts" before I 
left the company. 

At any rate all this example is not in the form of » 
lament, it is intended to back my statements that I do know< 
from whence I speak when I refer to prejudicial conversationi 
and discrimination. 

Oh, I forgot to mention one of the parts of my) 
ancestory which I feel is the most important part of all my\ 
parts~"Wo." "Wo?" You may ask. What's "Wo?" That is 
what the "politically correct" feminist might call a wo man. 
Politically correct terminology of the nineties. It's bullshit. 
And, if now, it has caused the demise of a nine-year fiiend- 
ship, that's bullshit too! 




^^^^^^^^Sajg^s^^HiS^gi 



nata by M/c/iefe Qveaim 

something.) I want it known that I have no animosity for 
the winners. I simply had a costume that I spent a lot of 
time, effort and money on. I was proud of it and believed 
I could have won something. I wanted to get "involved". 
I also want to thank all the many people who 












•Repressive Celibate and the Seven 
Politically Correct Height-Challenged. 

complimented me on my costume. AND THERE WERE 
MANY! 

I look forward to hearing what the people in charge of 
this contest have to say for themselves. 



Eric R. Dexter 



Campus Life 



Mainsheet November 18, 1993 page 7 



Student Survey: 

Do you think that men are more nurturing in the 90's? 




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Amy Killam 

Early Childhood Education 

"I think it depends on how he's 
raised. I suppose they have to 
because more women are out 
working." 



Chris Pereira 
Sports Training 

"Yes, you're kind of forced 
into it. Ifyou're not your 
woman will find someone who 
is." 



Michele Gendron 
Hotel/Rest. Management 

"Yes, they finally woke up 
and are sick of the games. 
Girls are playing the games 
now." 



Todd Anderson 
Physical Therapy Asst. 

"Yes, I would agree with that 
statement. More is expected of 
men now than in the past few 
decades." 



Nancy Boyce 
Physical Therapy Assit. 

"Yes, theyhave to be because 
more women are out of the 
house working." 



student Profile: Gregg Martin 




Pinto ^ CMf Stelmaeller 
Age: 27 

Hometown: Wareham 

Course of Study: Math/Science 

What do you like best about CCCC? I love Cape 
Cod! I love the professors here. I also like the fact 
that the school is small and if I get lost somebody 
is able to help me. 



What do you like least about CCCC? When the 
grades go to the computer a 3.83 it gets com- 
puted OS an A- or 3.67. The student loses on their 
final GPA. 

Who has been your most influential professor? 
Prof. Boleyn and Dr. J. They are environmentally 
aware and active. 

What books and movies would yoo recommend? 

Brother's Kara Mazov is my favorite book and 
Clockwork Orange is my favorite movie, it's in- 
tense. 

What's your pet peeve? Tailgaters. 

Howdoyouspend your free time? It's nonexistent. 

No, hiking the White Mountains. 

What message would you send to the president? 

Learn to listen, then listen to leam and follow 
through. 



by Jon Coutlnho 

Staff Writer 



The chance to see the Rubens' exhibit in Boston, 
has been called "a once in a lifetime opportunity" for a 
reason, and the 32 art enthusiasts who went to the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts through the Student Arts Club did not 
let this one slip by. 

The students wanted to witaess the first interna- 
tional loan exhibition ever moimted in the United States of 
17th century Flemish Baroque painting and on November 7, 
and they were not disappointed. 

This exhibit was far from a "yawnfesf' as these are 
true worics of art produced by'one of the masters of the 17th 
century. "The Age of Rubens" revolves around the leading 
artist of the period, Peter Paul Rubens, who justly occupies 
center sts^e, but the exhibit also offers a flill range of works 
by his chief pupils and collaborators. Also part of the 

exhibit are paintings by more than 50 other Flemish special- 
ists in the fields of history painting, portraiture, scenes firom 
I daily life, \aDdscape, still life, and animal painting. 

According to Ndr. Peter Sutton, an exhibit organizer 
and lecturer, "Flemish Baroque painting is one of the greatest 
achievements of Western European Art and this show has 
superior quality, so that Americans might at last appreciate 
the ravishing beauty, power, and sophistication of Flemish 
painting." 

Rubens liked to work big, garage door big. Stand- 
ing in front of Rubens' "Prometheus Bound," Jack, a liberal 
arts major, stood in slack jawed, wide eyed wonderment. 
"You don't stand in front of these and look at them-it's as if 
your standing m them looking around. Amazing," he said 
slowly shaking his head. 

Rubens himself once wrote, "I confess that I am, by 
instinct, better fitted to execute very large works, than small 



curiosities ... my talent is such that no undertaking, however 
vast in size or diversified in subject, has ever surpassed my 
courage." * 

Also of special interest to those on the trip, and 
especially Professor McDonald organizer of the trip, was the 
mid-career retrospective of contemporary artist Robert 
Gumming. Professor McDonald and Gumming were room- 
mates in college and both received a bachelor of fine arts 
degrees at the Massachusetts College of Arts. 

"The whole time I knew htm, he never finished a 
single piece ... now look at him," said Professor Mcdonald. 
"His father was an engineer and this greatly affected his 
work," he added pointing to Cummmg's 5 foot square giant 
comma with gold geometric background. 

The exhibit "Gone of Vision," is in the Torf Gallery 
through November 28. The main attraction is a giant light 
bulb combined with the facial features of a skull. Gumming, 
a native of Mattapan, adapted this design from the outline of 
the skull that often speared on early New England head- 
stones. 

Some of his other works are paintings of "the 
burning box" or his tribute to "the comma." His work is all 
contemporary, diametrically ^posed to the "masters" found 
elsewhere in the museum. 

"It was not to long ago that you had to be dead to be 
shown here," Professor Mcdonald said, "and art like this 
wasn't taken seriously." 

From the 3000 year old mummies, to Picasso and 
Jackson Pollack, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts has 
something for everyone. Judging from the art students 
blissful coitmients, the masterpiece collection of Rubens, 
which shows through January 2, combined with the contem- 
porary vision of Gumming proved to be an exhausting 
experience. 



H1MS(MER*T[MTERC0JIPM 




Rubens in Boston: The chance of a lifetime 



FRANK CIEEX 

RICHARD KM 

MARGARET VAX SiM 



il! 



4iKNF.KAI. ADMINMIONi (112 STl'DENXS/SENIORN) KM 

Ticket* AtvJbMc at dw HCTC Boi Oflicei 7W.I4.1I 

abw nan«Mc au JFK Mm mm /Pun fa ClDltaiD)t/<:apG Cod Cnainonitv CoOcjtc 



<^iili:rTh(.iitcr Companv in k>catcd In 
KirJL'UtD'S GALLERIES 

U.Tin ^ ()i.xan SirLvi> in IhiwTiumti IK-anniN 



Hens of 

thousands of people 

will need blood during 

the holidays. 

Still wondering 
what to give? 

+ 

Amencan Red Cross 

G iue blood t^ ain. Once more will befeitfor a Retime. 



page 8 Mainsheet November 18, 1993 



Studds: let polluters pay' to clean up waters 



by DARLENE MOKRYCKI 

Copy Editor 



X, 



ids today no longer learn about bomb shel- 
ters; they contemplate building compost heaps instead, 
Congressman Gerry Studds told an audience of over 200 
concerned citizens, scientists, and students at the State of 
the Cape conference, Saturday. 

"The greatest promise we have is within our kids," 
said Mr. Studds, the keynote speaker for the gathering. 

Congressman Studds went on to say that we must 
preserve Cape Cod to preserve our chil^en's future. 

"How can we tell Brazil to protect its rain forests when 
we are leveling our own national forests?" he queried. 

The conference, held in celebration of the 25th 
anniversary of the Association forthe Preservation of Cape 
Cod, was hosted by CCCC November 5-6. 

Congressman Studds, an environmentalist, told the 
group "We must attach aprice to pollution." He advocated 
a "polluter's pay" approach to funding the Clean Water 
Act. 

We've made Stellwagen Bank a marine sanctuary, 
we've savedthe whales, we've saved the Striped Bass, said 
Studds alleging that collectively we can make great strides 
in maintaining our environment. 



He suggested that the cleanup of Otis Air Force Base 
be an "incubator of new ideas;" that we join forces to make 
what we must do there a learning experience for all of us; 
that we make Otis a place to experiment vidth many of the 
new technologies available and being invented s o 

rapidly in these ecologically conscious times. 

"Where else would [news people] break into a regular 
newscast with the news that the Provincetown laundromat 
is open," quipped Studds, referring to the special unique- 
ness of this peninsula. 

In discussing some of the many pitfalls that interfere 
with efforts to preserve the Cape, Studds told his audience 
that it is very hard to ask the poor in our community to put 
the existence of the Spotted Owl at the top of its concern 
list. He repeated a comment heard on the House floor 
regarding certain environmentally sensitive issues where 
the person speaking warned in earnest that the "ecog.estapo 
will be on our doorstep." 

"It is not, and cannot be jobs versus the environment," 
said the Congressman, urging cooperation between devel- 
opers and environmentalists. 

Studds told the audience that our task is to create an 
environment that we not only want to live in, but are able 
to work in also. 

He closed his remarks by telling the audience that as 
much as the sand or sea, it is they who make Cape Cod a 
remarkable place to live. 





Installation ot new septic systems, via Title V, help maintain our groundwater quality 



Problem Solving Explore 



by SARAH PAINE CURLEY 

Staff Writer 

A zany group of Barnstable Public School Students brought 1 
and wit to the seriousness of the State of the Cape Conference, 
production of "Randy Fuschia," an original folk tale written 1 
students left lunchgoers laughing and Congressman Gerry 
searching for expression as he followed them to the mike. 

The group is part of the Odyssey of the Mind Program. Thili 
international program, involving students from kindergarten tb' 
college, and is designed to foster creative problem solving; 
through competition. The philosophy of "Odyssey of the Mind'' 
creativity, persistence, and cooperation will empower particips 
problem solve. 

Groups must present a stimulating problem and a solution follJ 
given rules including a strict time limit (8 minutes) and the inc; 

f two quotes. 



Environmental careers will be high on the list of jobs for the future 



by SARAH PAINE CURLEY 

Staff Writer 



My great grandfether's life almost spanned a 
century. He was bom before horseless carriages were 
invented, before Orville and Wilbur Wright's historic 
flight at Kitty Hawk, before the decline of clipper 
ships. He lived through two World Wars and the Great 
Depression. WTien he died, Yuri Gagarin and a handfiil 
of others had orbited the earth. Americans could fly 
coast to coast in six hours or less. And most homes had 
central heat and running water, though his did not. 

A whole century in retrospect can seem like a 
whirlwind. Imagine, if you can, what life would 
be like without the conveniences we take foi 
granted. Perhaps it is harder to imagine, looking 
forward, all the things that will change. What new 
technologies will we have and what kinds of jobs 
will be created by them? 

One fast growing field is environmental 
technology, "enviro-tech", as it is sometimes called. 
This relatively new industry has emerged in the last 10 
years. The Boston Globe states that an estimated 
73,000 people in Massachusetts work for firms provid- 
ing environmental goods and services. Some new 
firms, including Environmental Health and Engineer- 
ing of Newton and Ransom Environmental Consult- 
ants of Newburyport, are among the fastest growing 
companies in America. 

Though enviro-tech is considered a growth 
field, it can also be a volatile one. John Cook, president 
of Environmental Careers Organization, advises job 
seekers to stay alert. 

Mr. Cook warns that some firms that are 
soaring today could crash tomorrow. His Boston based 



non-profit firm placed 450 people last year. In Febru- 
ary they published a volume on breaking into the 
industry called Complete Guide to Environmental 
Careers. Brenda Boleyn, a CCCC science professor, 
has a copy in her office on the ground floor of the 
Science Building. 

According to the Globe, the long term outlook 
for environmental careers in bright because the envi- 
ronment has become a mainstream political issue. To 
comply with federal and state laws, 2.5 percent of the 
US gross national product, SI 24 billion, will be spent 
on enviroiunental projects this year. 

There is van- j. ety in environmentally 
oriented careers. jgSflj.. The Environmental 
Protection Cfi2wS&J5^t Agency em- 




800 people \J^ J^/ "' "' ^"^ from 

New England. The^^X United Nations and the 

Peace Corps continue to 

promote environmental education in underdeveloped 

countries. 

Public health experts test soil, air, and water 
for contaminates. New England Aquarium conducts 
research on endangered species. Marine biologists 
search for untapped resources and try to maintain a 
balance between fish supplies and modem fishing. 

As the planet's natural resources are slowly 
depleted, alternative energy sources are evaluated. 
Robert Watson, author of a report for the Natural 
Resources Defense Council entitled 
Looking for Oil in All the Wrong Places, says "We will 



have apost-petroleum society. The questionis whether 
it will be like Mad Max or Ecotopia." 

Forestry management is changing in the face 
of environmental awareness. Countries worldwide 
now recognize the merits of replanting and are striving 
for global reforestation, not only to maintain a renew- 
able resource, but also to protect oiu: future climate. 

Other areas of concentration cotild be urban 
planning, mass transit, civil engineering, hazardous 
waste management, climatology, or agricultural pro- 
duction, to name just a few. 

Some enviro-tech personnel are trained in 
liberal arts. They perform the essential work of 
translators, commimicators, and policy makers. 

Students are encouraged to use resources here at the 
college to research careers. Use the periodicals avail- 
able in the library and COIN, a computer program that 
searches various careers. This program can be 
ised at The Adult Re-entry Center. There is 
another computer program called ZIGY 1 that is 
available in the Administration Building. 

Martin Holdgate, director general of The 
World Conservation Union in Gland, Switzerland, 
defines tomorrow as "forty years from now." He 
writes, "If humanity is to have a sustainable future on 
this diverse planet ... it can only be through a process 
of international cooperation that transcends anything 
we see today." 

As we zoom toward a new century and a new 
milleimium, it seem apparent that enviroiunental is- 
sues can and will wrap their way in and out of many 
aspects of our lives. Perhaps some of the changes we 
encounter will be dictated by the environment itself 

The best way to prepare for the future is to 
educate ourselves. Education is the key. We can 
unlock the door. 



Mtfc 




Power lines 

Student 

by BRIAN FOR 

Staff Writer 

Theclej 
on Cape Cod thi 
everything they ( 
possible. 

Granted 
environment, bui 
a complicated pr 
for Otis. 



1^ 

iteuieCape 



Don't kill the Golden Goose --work ticnd in 
hand with tourists 




Recycling at 
Barnstable Re- 
cycling Cen- 
ter: Recycling 
is one way to 
help preserve 
ttie Cape's en- 
vironment 



"Odyssey of the Mind" 

group chose Edison, "Gee, this is 1 percent inspiration and 99 

t perspiration!"; and Emerson, "What is a weed? A plant 

virtues have not been discovered." 

problem and the solutions were relevant to the State of the 

Conference. 

students sang, acted and danced their way through a riveting 

ites of weird costumes, rapid fire dialogue, and colorfvd prop 

!S. 

Id you take the elevator to the year 2020? 
ir hero, Randy Fuschia, made waste from the Outfall Pipe 
ear, patched a hole in the ozone layer, then mutated into a 
lan." 

mded happily when a "mermaid" mutant appeared! 
six students involved in Saturday's production were Hale 
'ucker, Lindsay Bateman, Jo Lyn Ahnquist, Jahni Clarke, 
iv Smith and Nathan Grade. 

Barnstable group won competitions at local anfl state levels 
;nt on to the international competition at the University of 
md in June. 

7000 young people from around the world including Russia, 
and Australia, competed. "Randy Fuschia, Folk Hero of C^>e 
placed 4th for performance and 12th overall. 
>Tatulations on a fine showing internationally, and an enjoy- 
xformanceatCCCC! 




by DARIENE MOKRYCKI 

Copy Editor 



J he 



ross fragmented wildlife tiabitat 

entaryiOtIs cleanup working 



ssachusetts Military Reservation is a big environmental issue 
at people fail to understand, however is that Otis is doing 
lat the cleanup is being done as quickly and as effectively as 

)blem with hazardous waste, and yes, it is detrimental to the 
)t expect the cleanup to begin and end in a single day. "It's 
ien. John Carlson, the Environmental Coordinations Officer 



he Piping Plover, an endangered species, has 

been the subject of much heated debate recently, because 
environmentalists closed off barrier beaches for one month 
in summer to assure the survival of fledgling chicks. 

Dr. Eric Strauss, Plover expert and champion, 
explained details of the struggle for survival that the bird 
is facing. He depicted the young as particularly vulnerable 
when they feed down by the high tide line where people and 
vehicle traffic are both allowed. This discourse was 
heard at a workshop during the APCC conference Satur- 
day. The workshop was entitled Natural Resources, and 
was held during the morning session on Saturday. 

During the session, an audience participant men- 
tioned that some type of compromise might be in order so 
as not to infuriate the populace by prohibiting vehicular 
traffic entirely, and thereby setting back relarions with the 
entire environmentalist position. 

Next, Mr. Scott Horsley discussed groundwater 
and the Ocean Sanctuaries Act which prohibits sewage 
discharge into coastal waters. 

Several suggestions were listed which might com- 
bat contamination of Cape Cod's groundwater, including 
the implementation of cluster development in open space; 
the designation of all future water supply sites; effecting 
stronger groxmdwater classification programs; and public 
education and training. 

In his segment, Mr. Rob Gatewood com- 
mended the Conservation Commission forpro- 
tecting our wetlands. He said that "eco- 
systems are not just more important 
than we think, but that they are 
more important than we CAN 
think." He discussed the 
100 foot "buffer 
zone" around our 
wetlands as being cru- 
cial to hundreds of spe- 
cies of wildlife. Mr. 
Horsley suggested that we 
endeavor to sequester devel- 
opment outside of the buffer 
zone, enforcing a 100 foot regu- 
lating zone. 

Duringthe segment on fresh- 
water, panelist David Worden was con- 
cerned with lakes and ponds. 

Ed McMahon was 
quoted as saying that the "loss of aesthetic quality is as 
real as the loss of water quality." The discussion turned to 
"ovemourishmentofponds and their resultingalgae blooms. 

The challenge to contain the toxins from the 
plume at Otis was also discussed. 

A third problem investigated was the introduction 
of exotic aquatic plants such as water chestnut, whereby the 
plants are taking over the ponds and choking out the native 
species. 

Most of the hazardous waste lies in the aquifer, 
which is the underground water supply. Although there are 
many clean areas, there are 77 contaminated areas through- 
out the base's aquifer. 

The Installation Restoration Program (IRP), the 
cleanup program in effect on the base, must first find out 
what type of contaminants lie in the aquifer. Then, using the 
latest technology, they must extract the contaminants and 
dispose of them accordingly. 

Using the latest technology, however, does not 
always have its advantages. Since most of the equipment is 
brand new, the IRP must find out what techniques are 
effective by a trial and error process, according to Gen. 
Carlson. This is what makes the process so time consuming. 

"We might be doing this cleanup at a lightning 
pace," he said, "the problem is that we don't know. This type 
of equipment has never been used before so we cannot 
compare our performance in the cleanup to that of others, 
simply because we're the first to use it." 

Another important area in the cleanup of Otis that 
often goes ignored is their efforts in asbestos removal. The 
IRP effectively removed all the asbestos from the buildings 
on Otis and is now in the process of bringing the asbestos 
cleanup to a close. All in all the asbestos removal project 
turned out to be tremendously successful. 

The IRP is now in the opening stages of closing and 




line, said 




Ducks frolic In a brackisti estuary 

Various persons were heard from in this discus- 
sion, and calls for segregation of the freshwater bodies were 
entertained. This would mean allowing gasoline powered 
boats on some, development on others, and nothing at all on 
those designated as "primitive ponds." 

Liming of the acid ponds was questioned, and 
there was mixed feeling about this. While it was discussed 
that lime may be a solution to the problem of acidity caused 
by acid rain, it was clear that the quantities of lime to be 
used were still debatable. 

M s . Pat Hughes who discussed our shore- 
that "all septage eventually gets to 
coastal waters." 

Some coastal areas overloaded 
with docks etc., have essentially elimi- 
nated shellfish habitats, according to 
Ms. Hughes. She states that the big- 
gest problem is storm water runoff, 
which brings with it pollutants from 
ftuther inland areas. 

Outfall pipes were also dis- 
cussed, as was the new proposition 
from Plymouth for an outfall pipe 
which will dump its effluent into 
Cape Cod Bay. 

Ms. Hughes lu-ged citizens to 

get involved by becoming citizen 

monitors for town government, 

even if they had no time or desire 

to be a committee member per 

se. 

One universal solution 
offered in each phase of this 
Natural Resources workshop 
was "education," —education 
of the public, of our law en- 
forcement personnel, and of 
town officials themselves, 
the conclusion of the time 
allotted, a general meeting washeld,andthemajorpoints 
from each meeting were jotted down on overheads for all 
to see. The "Action Agenda" was thus formed. 
Suggestions ranged from "if you want to save it from 
development— buy it," to "you are never going to stop 
development, but it must be proper development." 

When referring to growth management and tour- 
ism, the phrase of the hour was "Don't kill the "Golden 
Goose," in the context that, after all, tourists do supply 75% 
of our revenue on Cape Cod." A consensus from them 
might very well be helpfid. 

capping the landfill on the base. "The contract was just 
awarded to a company in Falmouth and they have already 
begun the opening phases," Gen. Carlson said. "The capping 
process will begin within the next few months and is ex- 
pected to be completed within a few years." 

Also, Otis has recendy opened a solid waste treat- 
ment facility, where the towns of Mashpee, Falmouth, Sand- 
wich, and Otis send solid wastes for treatment before they are 
carted off to SEMASS. Soon the base will build a wastewater 
treatment plant, which will cover Sandwich and Mashpee , as 
well as other Cape Cod towns who wish to use it. 

Otis will also build a recycling center within the 
next few years, which will be another aspirin for the Cape's 
environmental headache. 

Although Otis takes many knocks for its so-called 
"abuse" of the environment, along with their cleanup efforts 
which don't seem to be good enough for many people, they 
seem to be getting along just fine in their efforts to better the 
environment. They are donating land, money, and facilities, 
as well as cooperation with town officials to see that Cape 
Cod stays environmentally sound. 



page 10 Malnsheet November 18, 1993 



Focus 



Kevorkian's crusade conjures up mixed emotions 



by MICHELE QUEENAN 

Focus Editor 



Dr. Jack Kevorkian known as "Dr. Death" was refusing 
bail after being anested November 4th for not paying an 
increased bond. This bond stems from his involvement in the 
crusade for assisted suicide for the terminally ill which began 
three years ago. 

An opponent of Dr. Kevorkian posted $2,000 bail to stop 
him from continuing a hunger strike which he began when 
first arrested. The opponent John DeMoss, a Michigan, 
lawyer said "I am sympathetic to the terminally ill but oppose 
the hysterical bunch of rhetoric from Kevorkian supporters." 

On November 9th Dr. Kevorkian accepted a bail offer 
saying "to refuse to leave after bond was posted would be 



unconscionably headstrong." 

Dr. Kevorkian has been present or has assisted in the 
deaths of 19 people who chose to die due to a terminal illness 
over the past three years. His assistance with a suicide on 
August 4th lead to the arrest of Dr. Kevorkian. This arrest is 
the first since he began crusading for assisted suicide for the 
terminally ill. 

Judge Thomas Jackson who raised Dr. Kevorkian's bail 
said "Kevorkian has shown utter contempt and flagrant 
violation of the state's assisted-suicide ban." The ban was 
put into effect back in May and remains in effect pending a 
review by the Michigan Cotut of Appeals. 

On Monday November 8th a week of public hearings on 
the law will be held by the Michigan Commission on Death 
and Dying. The 22 member commission must issue a 
recommendation this summer on continuing the ban on 
assisted suicide. 



A poll, sponsored by the New York Times newspapers 
in Florida found support for allowing the terminally ill to 
commit suicide but also showed people are split on whether 
a doctor such as Kevorkian should help them. The poll 
showed 62 percent of 759 adults surveyed by telephone 
believe that terminally ill people should be allowed to take 
their lives. 30 percent oppose the concept, and eight percent 
were imcertain. 

But when asked whether they believed a doctor should 
be allowed to help someone die, 48 percent said yes, 46 
percent said no, and six percent were uncertain. 

On our campus many people have mixed emotions about 
the role Dr. Kevorkian has played in assisted suicide. For the 
majority of students the feeling is that Dr. Kevorkian should 
not be in prison for what he has done, and that the decision 
to take one's own life should be left up to the person who has 
the illness. 



Focus Survey: 

Should Dr. Kevorkian be in prison for the role he plays in assisting the terminally ill to commit suicide? 



"^iPil^H 


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P 11 





Priscilla Lenane 
Criminal Justice 
"No, people should have a 
right to the choice and 
individually comprise their 
own will." 



Dave Moriaty 
Communications 
"No, people should die 
naturally and shouldn't be kept 
alive with life support. Die 
gracefully and with dignity." 



Heather Prew 

CNA 

"Yes, what he is doing is not 
right. He should not be 
involved in peoples' decisions 
to die." 



Peter Niland 
Criminal Justice 

"No, people should have the 
right to choose their own destiny 
especially if they're terminally 
iU." 



Angela Hennemuth 

Psychology 

"No, people have the right to 

decide when to die if 

terminally ill and shotddn't be 

forced to stay alive." 



Both sides of the issue 



Nobody has the right to play God 

by TOAA REDMOND TT * *°"'<' be in prison with the key thrown away! Who 

.Campus News Editor -"■ f°f ^' ^^ "^ I' /'• ^^^^ ^' 8"^ '' "»' 
techmcally breaking the law, but he is violating all the 

moral ethics of the western world. I realize that there 
is a separation of church and state but there should not be a separation of state and ethics. 

This country's judicial foundation is based on the Judeo-Christian principles. The 
last I heard " Thou shall not kill" was still on the Ust. I understand that he is not reaUy 
murdering anybody, but He's providing the means. Is life not a sacred mystery? Who is to 
be the final judge of when life is no longer productive? Where do we draw the line? Upon 
whose values do we base this decision? If we allow these assisted suicides, what's next? 

To allow this type of thing to be acceptable in society would permit a dangerous 
elementtomcrementallypervadesociety. Where do we stop thinning the herd? Whatother 
burdens of society do we get rid of? The mentally retarded, the homeless, the crippled, illegal 
aliens? You get my point. It is a short trip from assisted suicides to the gas chambers of 
Auschwitz. Isn't life cheap enough already with all the drive-by shootings, domestic 
violence, racial disturbances, abortions on demand, and terrorists running wild. " Thou shall 
not kiU " is the last bastion of law and order we have in this country and it's on a thin reed 
at that! Permitting assisted suicides would open up the flood gates of violence and death 
becauseitwouldbeconsideredacceptable. There would be no turning back. Anarchywould 
reign over principle. The buck definitely has to stop with" Dr. Death". 



Euthanasia... A personal outlook 



by MICHELLE FLETCHER 

Special Correspondent 



The %gg & I The Place For "After' 




521 Main Street 

Hyannis, MA 02601 

(508)771-1596 



• School 

• Dates 

• Homework 

• The Mall 

• Work 



• The Prom 

• The Beach 

• Movies 

• Hanging Out 



7 Days A Week • 11 p.m. At Night Til 1 1n The Afternoon 



Euthan^ia the term stirs up a myriad of emotions in . 
many different people. At this writing, there is much i 
controversy surrounding Dr. Jack Kevorkian, the man i 
labeled the "suicide doctor". 

While some people cheer his imprisonment there are others (like myself) who 
support his efforts. It seems to me, as time goes on, we are less and less in control of own 
destinies. Government dictates to us more and more, now insisting that we endure 
imminent death brave*y, and handle it, like it or not. 

I can only take the liberty to view my own opinion as it would pertain to my own 
mortality. I realize my opinion will open me up to extensive criticism, and perhaps even 
public ridicule, but I am self assured enough to take a stance on what I believe in. 

My position is pro-choice. My mother lost her battle with cancer on August 27th. 
She suffered a long brave battle, that virtually sucked the hfe out of her very being. For 
those who have never witnessed firsthand the horrors of cancer, you are fortunate indeed. 
Simple words on a page can't describe the overwhelming rage, bitterness and sheer 
helplessness one feels upon learning your parent has a terminal illness. 

I decided early on that I would never reveal to her my anguish. I was determined I 
to be her strength. I joked a lot. I made amends. Time was precious, and we lived it the 
best we could. 

But cancer is deadly. It metastasized very quickly. She was brave, but afraid. My 
mother didn't want to die from cancer, but she didn't want to live with it either. I watched 
helplessly as this vibrant woman became a mere shadow of herself. I recall her fi:equent 
statement "If I could just mark the day on the calendar..." She knew she was dying, and 
she didn't want to suffer anymore. 

Who are we, as healthy individuals, to dictate to 'another what they must endure? 
We all have different thresholds of tolerance. 

Isn't it crazy that we have no problem putting an animal "out of it's misery," but 
condone watching a human suffer? 

When there is no hope, and death is forthcoming doesn't an individual deserve the 
right to end their pain? We all hope when our time comes to die with dignity. This is 
stripped ofa person who is tenninal. My mother died weighing 69 pounds. There was no 
quality of life. Assisted suicide is merciful when a person lays wracked in pain, and is 
waiting to die. Is this wliat we'd wish for ourselves, to lie helpless, in pain, in despair, to 
appease the morality of individuals unqualified to relate on a personal level? 

I believe God is loving and forgiving, and would not love us less if we succumbed 
to this disease and chose to exit with some dignity, sparing ourselves of physical pain and 
emotional despair, and of least importance of all, the financial burden we leave behind? 

I feel that my personal experience with a terminal loss, as well as my mothers input 
on the subject of euthanasia, has given me the input and the motivation to express my views 
on this highly volatile subject. 

I am in support of Dr. Kevorkian, and his humanitaiian efforts to alleviate the pain 
of those facing the inevitable. 



Features 



Mainsheet November 18, 1993 page 1 1 



Deadbeat parents are costing you money 

Tax payers are paying for other people's children, because parents are not paying child support 

hprailCP hpr Pv-hiichatiH Incf hie if\\\ onH har itrmmnlfwmnt^nf tU^:* »■.« 1,:^^ *> 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Staff Writer 



Massachusetts tax payers are 
shelling out millions of dollars 
because parents won't pay their 
child support payments. 

A recent report released by DOR re- 
vealed the impact of child support delin- 
quency on the Massachusetts' welfare caseload. 
It focuses on more than 83,000 families who 
receive Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) 
and who qualify for child support payments, but do not 

receive them. 

Using income tax data to analyze ability to pay, the 
Massachusetts Department ofRe venue (DOR) estimates that 
15,700 parents earn enough money to make child support 
payments to remove their families from AFDC, saving the 
taxpayers SI IS million annually. 

Because of negligence in paying child support, $646 
million dollars was owed to Massachusetts alone, at the end 
of fiscal year 1993. 

The case load now totals 248,111. There are 87,431 
families with children under the age of eighteen or in college 
who should be receiving child support payments. Only 
46,641 are paid on time, while 86,469 cases are in arrears. 
Cases waiting for paternity issues to be cleared number 
74,211. 

According to Mike Cuff, director of the Financial Aid 
Department, of the 1 , 100 CCCC students who receive finan- 
cial aid, 160 of them receive AFDC. 

The last year Dina, a CCCC student, received any child 
support was 1988. When her ex-husband defaulted on a court 
order, she went to court to obtain some money. At that time 
she knew of his whereabouts and called the DOR and told 
them where they could find her ex-husband. She received no 
help. 

If her ex-husband were paying child support, she would 
not have to go on AFDC in order to go to school. 

Pam, a mother of two children and a student interested 
in business administration, was forced to go on AFDC 



because her ex-husband lost his job, and her unemployment 
payments had expired. Previous to her ex-husband losing his 
job, she collected $200.00 a week from him. 

If child support payments were being received, the 
number of AFDC recipients would be down, saving tax 
payers millions of dollars. According to information from 
the Department of Revenue, the state government has taken 
a serious look at this matter, and intends to make a few 
changes in Massachusetts, concerning child support. 

"Last April we filed legislation that would give Massa- 
chusetts the strongest child support enforcement program in 
the nation," Revenue Commissioner Mitchell Adams said. 
"If this bill passes it will mean an extra S60 million per year 
for single-parent families and it will save the taxpayers over 
$102 million a year in AFDC and Medicaid expenses." 

There are two major reasons why qualified families do 
not receive child support. First, in approximately 74,000 
cases, the child was bom out of wedlock and paternity has not 
been established. Therefore, there is no child support order 
that DOR can enforce. 

Secondly, in another 22,000 cases, a child support order 
exists but the absent parent is avoiding payment. Usually 
when the parent is evading payment, he or she is self- 
employed, preventing DOR from deducting child support 
directly from his or her paycheck. 

Governor William Weld has come out in support of 
the proposed legislation. "The numbers in this study speak 
for themselves," said Governor Weld. "This analysis should 



'Failure to pay child support can- 
not - and will not - be tolerated in 
Massachusetts,' said Lt. Gover- 
nor Cellucci. 'It hurts families. It 
hurts taxpayers.' 



serve as a clarion call to every member of the legislature that 
non-payment of child support is not somebody else's prob- 
lem. It affects nearly every community in the 
ConmionWealth. Passing House 4944 will send a clear 
message throughout Massachusetts that no one should be 
able to duck the responsibility and obligation of supporting 



their own kids.' 

Lt. Governor Paul Cellucci also supports the measure. 
"Failure to pay child support cannot - and will not - be 
tolerated in Massachusetts," said Lt. Governor Cellucci. "It 
hurts families. It hurts taxpayers. We must do something now 
to stanch the flow of tax dollars that is flowing out of 
Massachusetts coffers in the form of AFDC payments that 
could be saved if absent parents would fulfill this fundamen- 
tal parental responsibility." 



'If you can't find absent parents, 
you can't make them pay' 



This bill would strengthen DOR's Child Support En- 
forcement Program in four key ways: 

Paternity Acknowledgement in the Hospital: This bill 
requires hospitals to provide both parents with information 
about the responsibilities of parenting to encourage them to 
acknowledge paternity at the time the birth certificate is 
prepared. In Massachusetts there are 61,000 femiUes on 
AFDC without alegally identified father. Establishing pater- 
nity in these cases is an expensive, time-consuming and 
adversarial process. 

Expanded Location Sources: If you can't find absent 
parents, you can't make them pay. House 4944 would give 
DOR access to more address information, such as billing 
addresses from cable television companies and other utiU- 
ties. 

License Revocation: Thousands of self-employed ab- 
sent parents do not pay child support. This bill would -after 
a notification and hearing process - permit DOR to revoke 
their professional licenses. 

Medical Support Enforcement: Allows DOR to en- 
force the health insurance provisions of child support orders 
as well as the monetary provisions. Also it makes employers 
who do not comply with these orders liable for medical costs 
incurred during the period of noncompliance. 

"The children of Massachusetts deserve the best future 
we can give them," said Adams. "This bill can make the 
future alot brighter for thousands of families in the Conmion- 
wealth, and we owe it to them - and to the taxpayers - to pass 
this legislation." 



Stress, stress, and more stress 



by MELISSA PHANEUF 

Staff Writer 



The cnmch is on. 

Exams, quizzes, research papers, and speech deliv- 
eries 
all seem to happen in the same week. 

Every year at this time, it seems that there is too 
much work to get done in a week, never mind one day. The 
amount of reading, writing, and cramming that stares up at 
students is overwhehning. 

And yet some students have another stress causing 
situation to deal with, COLLEGE APPLICATIONS! ! ! ! 

They have made the decision to go on to a four-year 
institution after receivinganassociatesdegree here at CCCC. 
That was the easy part. 

Now, they have to narrow their choices down, and 
figure out which schools, out of the ones they have received 
information from, to apply to. That part gives the students 
the most sfress. 

Here in the United States students face a problem 
that students in other countries do not have. There are 
hundreds of colleges and higher education facilities in our 
country. Living in Massachusetts, with an incredible number 
of first rate schools to choose from, is even more mind- 
boggling. 

Having this many colleges to choose from is a great 
opportunity. It gives students the freedom to choose the type 
of education they wish to receive. The Ultimate College 
Shoppers Guide, written by Heather Evans and Deidre 
Sullivan states, "Every college in this country has something 
special about it, and something that makes it the right place 
for certain students." 

So many choices can also be a burden. With so 
many schools to choose from, making rational decisions is 
very difficult. The Guide also states "For many students, the 
hardest part of the process is simply getting to know the 



hundreds of fine institutions available, and narrowing the 
field to the most ^propriate, and most exciting, schools." 
Students' decisionmaking can be influencedbymany things, 
such as where their parents want them to go, whether they 
want to move away or stay close to home, financial situa- 
tions, and where their concentration of study is offered. But, 
the biggest influence is where they are accepted. 

After deciding which schools to apply to, all stu- 
dents need to do is fill out the {^plications. 

STRESS, STRESS, STRESS, STRESS, STRESS ! 

This is when it is necessary to have time and 
patience. In order to complete the application for most 
schools, the student must write many dreaded essays. As if 
students don't have enough essays and papers to write for 
their classes! 

These essays are very important in the application 
process. They allow the colleges to know each individual 
student that is applying. 

When a student notices the blank lines on the third 
or fourth page of the application which states, "Use this space 
to provide additional information about yourself," panic sets 
in. The first thought is "Is this part optional?" Then reality 
sets in. The student realizes that this is the most important 
part of the application. The trick to this part, is to write as 
many positive things as possible wathout lying. Some 
students may feel as if they have done nothing worth writing 
about. This is impossible. Make a list of things that are 
important, or of interest to you. Write about something that 
has helped to get through a difficult situation, or a learning 
experience. Or consult a college guide that lists essay topics 
and pick one. The possibilities are endless. 

If an essay topic is given, just write about it. Take 
time to think through the response, but let it flow. Think of 
it as a gift to actually be given a topic to write about. 

When the essay is complete, put the application in 
the envelope, write the check, and send it on its way. Don't 
give it another siressfid thought ... until the replies comes in 
the mail. 



Cooking with Cranberries 



by Jack Higgins 

Hungry Man 




Grandma's Cranberry 
Bread 

1 cup sugar 

2 cups flour 

1 egg (beaten) 

1/2 tsp. baking soda 

1 1/2 tsp. baking powder 

1/4 cup margarine 

(melt-soflen) 
3/4 cup orange juice 



1/2 cup chopped walnuts 

1 tbs. orange rind (zest) mix these together-add last 

1 cup cranberries (halved) 

Sifl together dry ingredients then add sugar, egg, 

and margarine. 

Add mixture to greased loaf pan. 

Sprinkle cinnamon and sugar on top before baking. 

Bake in 350 degree oven. 

1 large loaf 1 hr. 

2 medium 45 min. 

4 small 30 min. "Happy Holidays" 



experience. Or consult a college guide that lists essay topics 
and pick one. The possibilities are endless. 

If an essay topic is given, just write about it. Take time 
to think through the response, but let it flow. Think of it as 
a gift to actually be given a topic to write about. 

When the essay is complete, put the appUcation in the 
envelope, write the check, and send it on its way. Don't give 
it another stressfiJ thought .^ until the replies conies in the 
mail. 



page 12 Mainsheet November 18, 1993 , 



Cooperative Education benefits everyone 



by SARAH PAINE CURLEY 

Staff Writer 



Cooperative education builds confidence in students 
and strengthens colleges while building ties within the 
community. 

President Clinton recently voiced his support for pro- 
grams that "don't just take what is earned in the classroom 
out to the community, but what is learned in the community 
back into the classroom." 

Co-op is a program of 
structured woricexperience de- 
signed to provide students with 
hands on, real world experi- 
ences. These work experi- 
ences can occur in private busi- 
ness and industry or in the 
public sector as national ser- 
vice. The federal government 
alone employs 14,000 co-op 
students. 

Integration between the 
classroom and the community is the essence of co-op. 
According to Community College Journal, co-op serves 
students, faculty, and employer interests. 

Co-op enhances learning. Some skills cannot be learned 
in the classroom, such as an understanding of workplace 
culture. A preUminaiy study by Robert Sternberg of Yale 
University and Richard Wagner of Florida State show that 
students' grade point averages tent to rise after a co-op 
placement. 

"Book learning takes on more credibility and provides a 
focus for learning," said CCCC Professor Barbara Swaebe, 
who just returned firom a four day conference of the National 
Society for Experiential Learning in San Francisco. "Co-op 
builds confidence and competence," she said. 

Studies conducted a Lane Community College in Oregon, 
one of the nation's largest commimity college co-op pro- 
grams, indicate that the drop out rate of co-op students is 
lower than that of classroom-only students. The difference 
may very well indicate that Co-op students desire fiirther 
education and their earnings might provide the means for this 
extended education. 



'My retail cooperative work ex- 
periences paid off. Last Thurs- 
day, Filene's promoted me to 
Department Manager of home 
and intimate apparel. 1 am an- 
other step closer to my goal.* 



the CCCC Coordinator of the Retail Management Program. 
She believes the co-op program has a "distinct advantage" 
for the college because it "keeps the faculty on their toes." 
The faculty gets feedback irom students and employers and 
therefore stay up-to-date with changes that should be empha- 
sized or pieces of the curriculum that might be missing. 

Employers may find salary co-op placements to be an 
attractive alternative to hiring new permanent employees 
during times of economic uncertainty. Regardless of the 
state of the economy, a high 
percentage of students ulti- 
mately are offered permanent 
positions by their co-op em- 
ployer. 

Lone Miller, a June '93 
graduate of the retail manage- 
ment program said recently, 
"My retail cooperative work 
experiences paid off. Last 
Thursday, Filene's promoted ■ 
me to Department Manager of 
home and intimate apparel. I 
am another step closer to my goal." 

DonWitkoski, coordinatorof the Hotel/Restaurant Man- 
agement program said another advantage of the co-op pro- 
gram is that students find out early if they like the field they 
are studying, enabling them to change courses of study, if 
necessary, without wasting precious time. 

"Co-op is most important," he added. "It provides a 
smooth transition from school to the workplace upon gradu- 
ation." 

Several graduates of the CCCC co-op programs are in 
management positions today. They maintain close ties with 
the college and contact program coordinators when they 
have openings that need to be filled. 

Debbie Harju, manager of Lane Bryant's at the Cape 
Cod Mall, is a former CCCC co-op student. When apart time 
opening developed this fall, she called CCCC for a co-op 
student to fill the position. 

"The cooperative work experience was a vital part of my 
education," Debbie said. She wanted to be a mentor for a 
CCCC student, to provide that same experience to someone 
else. 




Features 

Mickey 

offers 
interships 

to students 



by JENNIFER DIXON 

Staff Writer 



Barbara Swaebe, herself aproduct of co-op education, is 



Save a buck with a Student ID Card 



by SARAH PAINE CURLEY 

Staff Writer 



A student ID card caii be a ticket to savings. Did 
you know that you can save 30 percent on computer 
hardware,or 15 percent on books? How about discounted 
bike rentals? 

Smart students everywhere use their ID card when they 
shop. There are deals to be had. All one needs to do is ask. 

Tech Plus Computers Co. in Yarmouth carries new and 
used computers and offers a 30 percent discount on the 
purchase of any computer hardware. 

The Outdoor Shop in South Yarmouth gives students a 
10 percent discount on rentals and purchases. 
Butler Sporting Goods in Hyannis also offers a 10 percent 
discount "across the board" (except on hockey skates). 

A student with an ID can rent skis for $10 a day at Cape 
Cod Ski, Bike, and Scuba, Inc. at any of their three locations: 
Hyannis, Harwichport, or Orleans. 

Compass Rose Bookstore in Orleans offers students a IS 
percent discount on materials used for the research projects 
or classroom assignments. 

The Market Bookshop in Falmouth does not specifically 
offer a student discount, but does have a discoimt night. 
Everything is 10 percent off on Wednesday evening flrom 
5:30 to 9. 

Friendly's on Rt. 132 in Hyannis offers a 10 percent 
discount with a sUident ID. The Friendly's at the mall, 
however, does not. 

Hyannis Art Supply offers 10 percent oflF all piurchases 
with a student ID. There is also a one-time 15 percent 
discount card, available through your instructor, to help 
students with their initial purchase. Go in with a list of 
necessary supplies, the store discount card and save. After 
this first purchase, present a student ID to get a 10 percent 
discount. 

Students 25 years old or younger are eligible for dis- 
counted airfare. US Air's non-stop trips of 750 miles or less 
are only $59 one way or $123.50 round trip. There is no 
advance purchase necessary but tickets are subject to avail- 
ability. 

TWA sells a discount card to students ages seventeen to 



twenty five. The cost is $25 and will save 1 percent on any 
flight. These cards are available fi-om local travel agents. 

Another great deal for students of any £^e is the Student 
Advantage Card, available for $5 and accepted by 150 
vendors in Boston and 750 in New England. Though no 
businesses in our immediate area recqgnize this card, there 
are fantastic savings to be had. 

With the Student Advantage Card, students ages 18 and 
up can rent a compact car for $25 a day with unlimited 
mileage. (There is a25 percent surcharge for students under 
2 1 .) Card holders who fly can get cash back on airline tickets. 

The Student Advantage Card comes with handy wallet 
sized listings of businesses that recognize this card and their 
respective discounts. There are four different directories, 
covering Boston, New York, and all of the New England 
area. Each listing covers many retail stores, nightclubs, 
restaurants, and the like. 

For more information or to purchase the Student Advan- 
tage Card call 1-800-333-2920. 



Here are some of the many listings 
from the Student Advantage Card directory 
for the Boston area. 

Pizza Romano, 466 Commonwealth Ave.: buy any 

pizza, get the second one firee! 

Stitches Comedy Club, 835 Beacon St.: half price 

admission Sundays through Thursdays. 

Axis, 13 Lansdowne St.: two for one admission on 

Friday nights. 

AUston Beat, 384 Newbury St.: 15 percent offaU 

clothing. 

Squintz, 472 Commonwealth Ave.: 20 percent off 

prescription eyewear. 

And so it goes, firom florists to copy shops to music stores 

to hair salons to 

For more information or to purchase the Student Ad van- 
tage Card call 1-800-333-2920. The world is fiiU of great 
deals! Once you have this card, you won't want to leave 
home without it. 



Mickey and Minnie Mouse have supplied students 
at CCCC with numerous intern jobs at one of the world's 
most successful entertaimnent centers, Walt Disney World. 
This program is offered to all students by The Walt 
Disney Corporation through the school's Hotel Restaurant 
Department. Robert K. Johnson, coordinator of Hotel/ 
Restaurant Management and Donald Witkoski, co-op coor- 
dinator of Hotel/Restaurant program, enable students vrith 
the opportunity to apply for the co-op program that Disney 
offers. 

Disney provides low-rate housing, jobs working in 
a variety of areas in the hotel/restaurant and business fields, 
and an opportunity to experience the excitement and respon- 
sibility of working in a professional environment. Some of 
the jobs include that of hotel clerks, running vending stands, 
chefs and accounting positions. Mr. Witkoski adds that 
Disney is known for its prominent ciilinary arts program. 

There are three sessions that Disney interviews for 
in the Northern New England area: fall, spring and summer. 
The time they choose to start the co-op, conveniently coin- 
cides with semesters here at CCCC. As aresult, students can 
start at the beginning of the semester and return before the 
following semester. Also some students choose to go in the 
summer session to avoid missing classes in the ^1 and 
spring. In addition, students have the chance to take classes 
at Florida colleges as the credits can be transferred back to 
CCCC. 

"Once a Disney person, always a Disney person," 
Mr. Witkoski confides. There have been instances where the 
co-ops did so well at Disney, that they were asked to return 
upon graduation, and several have. Co-op students can 
benefit fi-om this experience greatly, because they are inter- 
acting with people from all over the country and can have fun 
too, he added. 

There are no special requirements for students to 
enter this program other than they have at least one full 
semester completed at CCCC. Once students are placed in 
the co-op program, they are guaranteed minimum of30houis 
a week at a salary between $5-$6 an hour. 

All fun aside, the program requires that the student 
take a class once a week on Disney's successful marketing 
and accounting strategies. From this, student leams how 
Walt Disney became the entertaiimient giant that it is today. 
Students can benefit fi'om this internship in many 
ways, says Mr. Witkoski. "They get to experience job 
training in their field, and also live in Disney World; some- 
thing every child dreams about. Not to mention being in the 
sunshine can be a benefit in itself." 




EMPORIUM 

Largest bead store on Cape Cod 

Offering semi-precious, glass, crystal, 

^eedbeads, bone, leather and findings 

^ring in this ad for a 20% discount I 

I Ex£ireiJV30/V3j 

590 Main Street, Hyannis 

790-0005 




Entertainment 

Music with a meaning 

by ERIK VOLPE 

Special C orrespondent 

Usually when some one says the words "punk rock" 
music images of multi colored mohawks, fast lyrics (that you 
can't understand and probably don't want to), and neo-nazi 
skinheads, flash through your mind. However, if you stop 
and take a closer look you'll find, contrary to popular belief, 
most pimk music possesses intellectual lyrics, and the music 
itself can be most uplifting. 

Punk originated in New York City and Southern 
California between the late seventies and early eighties. 
Bands like the Sex Pistols, Dead Kennedys, The Ramones 
and Joy Division opened the flood gates and were followed 
by bands like SNFU, Bad Religion, Minor Threat, Black 
Flagg and one of my personal favorite bands (which sadly 
enough have fallen into the hands of the new so-called 
alternative label) Social Distortion. 

Bad Religion, is one of the foundation bands that 
newpunkbandstodayarebasingtheirrootson. BadReligion 
came out with a new album this year csHedRecipe For Hate. 
The new album may not be better than earlier albums such as 
Against the Grain or Suffer, but they are still at the top with 
the rest of today's bands. Lead vocalist Greg Graffin is still 
writing lyrics that make you think about politics, religion and 
other synthetic flaws of the human face. Rhythm Guitarist 
Mr.Brett has opened up a new label called Epitah and is 
promoting some hot young new bands like Pennywise, 
Offspring and Sublime. In these bands, if you listen closely, 
you'll hear traces of Bad Religion. 

Peimywise, one of punk's newest and brightest 
bands from Southern California, has a sound, some say, 
which is a cross between Bad Religion and Minor Threat (not 
such a bad mix). The band features band members choosing 
to go by first name only; Jim on vocals, Fletcher on guitar, 
Byron on drums and Jason on bass. Their modem lyrics deal 
with real issues and they tend not to beat around the bush, no 
moaning and groaning here, their lyrics are based on pure 
sagacity. Songs like "Bro Hymn" and "Come Out Fighting" 
deal with friendship and hanging onto friends in a tough 
situations. 

"Dying to Know," a track from their new album (yn^Tiovfn 
Road, is about the hypocrisy of religion. If you let the album 
run long enough, you'll find a secret song at the end. The 
name of the band came from Steven King's novel 77 and the 
infamous clown "Pennywise." 

The band'sUve performances are always intense and are 
sure to get the old veins pumping. It's not tmusual at the end 
of each show for the whole audience to get on stage and 
bellow out the lyrics to "Bro Hymn" in a wild orchestra. 

According to a recent article in WARP magazine, slam 
dancing and moshing is acceptable at their shows, but 
Peimywise frowns on those who intentionally injure fellow 
moshers, the band tends to deal with this type of violence a 
lot when they play inside the Los Angeles area. 

If your interested in buying any of the Epitah labeled 
bands such as Pennywise, Offspring, Bad Religion etc. you'll 
have to go to Newburry Comics or Tower Records, most 
stores in the area don't seem to carry much punk music. So 
if your interested in opening your mind the next time your at 
the record store instead of buying that trendy new band of the 
month created by MTV, pick up a real album that actually 
means something. 



Mainsheet November 18, 1993 page 13 







Phantom chills bones. 



by TERRI LADD 

Staff Writer 



How far will you go to see a good play? Boston? 
New York? How about London? This year's production of 
"Phantom of the Opera" at Her Majesty's Theater in London 
is well worth the trip. 

The bone chilling music of Andrew Lloyd Weber 
combined with the voice and acting of Ethan Freeman makes 
the performance one of the most popular in the London 
theater district. The performance is sold out days in advance 
and played before a full and enthusiastic crowd. For many 
it is not their first viewing in this theater. 

Weber, 45, is known for his music in "Joseph and the 
Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" (1968), "Jesus Christ 
Superstar" (1971), "Cats" (1981),"StarlightExpress" (1984) 
and many others. He has received four Tony Awards, four 
Drama Desk Awards, three Grammys and five Laurence 
Oliver Awards. 

He is the first person to have three musicals running 
in NewYork and three inLondon (1982 and 1988). In 1991, 
he surpassed all his previous records and made theater 
history by becoming the first person to have six shows 
r unnin g simultaneously in London's West End. The list of 
this man's achievements seems endless. 

The resoimding organ music of "Phantom" has a 
stilling effect on the audience at this relatively small theater. 
Being a musical, the story is told mainly in song and scenery. 
The theater has been transformed for this musical with 



scenery and props becoming part of the theater itself 

The main story, written by Gaston Leroux in 191 1, is set 
around the remarkable Paris Opera House in the year 1881. 
It was a hotbed of politics and factions. From prima donna 
to stage hand the Opera House was governed by intrigue and 
nmior. Everyone jostled for position and defended their own 
territory or scrabbled for new. 

As this was happening a new set of owners takes over the 
Opera House and begins to encounter the mysterious "hap- 
penings" that incumber productions. 

Phantom, played by Freeman, imparts his knowl- 
edge of music on a mere chorus girl helping her rise to 
stardom. He is rivaled by an old lover from the girl's youth. 
At the same time Phantom is taking over the girl's mind and 
soul. The owners and company are forced by Phantom to do 
things his way or accept the punishment. 

Phantom never fiilly reveals himself imtil the final 
scene where he secretly becomes part of the cast. The story 
itself is compelling enough to keep the audience on the edge 
of their seats and resound with loud approval at the end of 
each scene. 

One very tender scene towards the end of the 
production involving the girl's choice over her own fate and 
that of the Phantom had most of the audience to the point of 
tears. 

The combination of musical score, articulate acting 
and singing along with the intimacy of the theater and the 
intrigue of London itself makes 'Phantom' well worth the 
trip across the atlantic. 



CD Review BLIND MELON 

Neo- Hippies show success can be torturous and empty 




by JACK HIGGINS 

Entertainment Editor 



A year ago Blind Melon's first release, Blind Melon was 
on the shelves of record stores across the country selling a 
paultry 1700 to 1800 units a week, and the band was 
wondering what had happened to the success they had strived 
for. 

Having already participated on the MTV 120 Min- 
utes tour, filled the opening 



.-i. (SOS} 2.4-0-025T 4» •. 






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slot on a tour with Sound Gar- 
den, recorded their first disc 
and released the single "Tones 
of Home," the band expected 
something to h^pen. Itdidn't. 

Then last spring, with 
the supportoftheirrecord com- 
pany, they released a video for 
the second single "No Rain". 
This launched the career of 
the so called "Bee Girl" (who 
is also featured on the cover of 
the CD) and started the Mel- 
ons rise to platinum status. 

The video was released 



into MTV rotation in June and by Septem- 
ber the disc had gone past the million 
mark in sales. 

After listening to the disc you 
have to wonder if you can sell anything 
musical without the imagery of MTV. 
Blind Melon can certainly stand on their 
own as a touring act, but it certainly 
needed MTV to reach the record buying 
public. What a shame! 

This disc is infectious, combin- 
ing a funky rhythm section with chunky, 
fat, syncopated guitar and smooth clean 

leads. The sojmd is quite reminiscent of 

mid 70 ' s rock, Gratefiil Dead, Atlanta Rhythm Section, and 
Wishbone Ash come to mind. 

The tales woven lyrically throughout this recording 
show the downside of the business in which this band has 
aspired. This band certainly does not like what they have 
gone through to be where they are, but in life you have to 
concede some things to get ahead. 

The songs here are catchy, yet introspective, letting 
us aU in to where they have been while working towards a 
dream that seems to be different than expected. 

There are some standouts on this disc, one of which 
was the first single "Tones of Home," they talk about their 
move to L.A. while the whole time thinking of home. 

The acoustic intro to "Change" complete with 
harmonica sounds very much like Neil Young. 
Other standouts include "No Rain" the famous Bee Giirl song. 
"Deserted," and the wonderfiiUy peacefiil "Sleepy House" 
which draws tones from the Allman Brothers. 

On the whole this is a very even, fine sounding 
release, but when it comes time for their sophomore effort, 
I hope they become more at ease with their popularity and 
celebrity status. Blind Melon isn't the only band that has had 
to leave friends, family, and familiar surroundings to achieve 
the platinimi plateau. 



Wi'tU -fAtS AP».. 






Advertise in the MainSheet 

Reach 4000 intelligent beautiful, big 
spenders. Next deadline: November 28 



ibziWfibH^BiBaKsmB 



page 14 Mainsheet November 18, 1993 

Flesh and Bone: 
Fluff and drone 



by SHERRY AHEARN 

Staff Writer 

It is a disheartening experience to spend seven dollars 
and two hours of a perfectly good Friday night watching a 
film which has not one shred of redeeming value, io, 
unless you're just going for the popcorn or need a dark place 
to take your date, avoid Flesh and Bone at all costs. 

The film which stars Dennis Quaid, Meg Ryan and 
James Caan tells the story of Arliss, a vending machine 
salesman (Quaid) who is haunted by a secret firom his past. 
He meets up with Kay (Ryan), a tough but vulnerable 
woman with possibly one of the worst Texas drawls in film 
history. James Caan, who has never looked or acted worse, 
plays Arliss' father, a despicable character who commits a 



'unless you're just going for the 
popcorn or need a dark place to 
take your date, avoid Flesh and 
Bone at all costs.' 

heinous crime 30 years earlier which is the basis (using the 
term loosely,) for the plot. 

The film is so downright predictable and the dialogue 
and characters so weak, the star power of the cast could not 
save it fi-om becoming a bore. There is absolutely no 
chemistry between the real-life married couple of Quaid 
and Ryan, and James Caan's character is just plain too siUy 
to be taken serioiKly. At about a naming time of two hours. 
Flesh and Bone runs about 90 minutes too long. 

So, if you like Dennis Quaid, go rent ne Right Stuff. 
Are you a Meg Ryan fan? Watch When Harry Met Sally. 
Is James Caan one of your old faves? Take home Misery. 
And don't even attempt to rent Flesh and Bone when it 
comes out on video, which will no doubt be very soon. The 
poor cast has been humiliated enough. 



Entertainment 





Concrete Blonde rages again 



by SHEILA JOHNSON 

Editor in Ctiief 



Johnette Napolitano is a remarkable performer, fi-om the 
second she sauntered onto the stage the audience was mes- 
merized by her brash and beautiful charm. Concrete Blonde , 
the old punk band turned pop/altemative/rock, was as fiery 
as ever at Lupo's Heartbreak Hotel in Providence, RI. 

The band, most knovm for their 1990 hit song "Joey," 
consists of Napolitano on bass and lead vocals, Jim Mankey 
guitarist, and Harry Rushakoff drummer. Live, the trio has 
an egdieness, a willingness to defy. 

The band opened up with "Haimted Head," a track fi-om 
the first album True. On this album there is a hint of punk, 
as the band continued over the years with Free, Bloodletting, 
Walking in London, and this years release, Mexican Moon, 
they developed a completely different sound. Each albimi is 
an entirely new experience. 

In between each track, Napolitano did not just continue, 
she stopped and spoke to the audience, told them a story, 
joke, and even thanked them for existing. "You are EVERY- 
THING, with out you, were are nothing." 

Before playing "God is Bullet," an angry song about 
dying by gunshot for no reason, Napolitano question the 
audience if they like guns, one woman screamed "I do," 



Robert De Niro and Lillo Brancato in A Bronx Tale 



by LAUREL BLOOM 

Movie Lady 



Some things in life just aren't fair. After seeing Robert 
De Niro ' s directorial debute Bronx Tale, I now have to make 
a decision. Do I like Robert De Niro better as an actor, or as 
a director? De Niro has always been one of my favorite actors 
and of course I was skeptical when I heard he was directing. 
It seems as though there's an epidemic of great actors 
becoming directors, but in this instance DeNiro proves 
himself as an all-around talent. 

A Bronx Tale, is a story about a boy, Calogero (played 
by Lillo Brancato) growing up in the Bronx in the 1960's. 
The drama revolves around his conflict between two men. 
The first is his father Lorenzo (played by Robert De Niro). 
Lorenzo is an honest man that earns an honest living as a bus 
driver. The second is a local crime-boss named Sonny 
(played by Chazz Palminteri) that feels indebted to Calogero 
(nicknamed "C" by Sonny) for not ratting him out to the 
police after "C" witnesses him killing a man. Lorenzo is 
proud of his son for not telling the police, but tells him, "You 
did a good thing for a bad man." 

"C", being only nine, is mesmerized by Sonny's way of 
life. Fancy cars, lots of money and the usual things you 
would expect fi-om a gangster. What isn't expected, is that 
Soimy is a good guy where the boy is concerned. He doesn't 
try to suck him into a life of crime, but rather encourages him 
to stay in school and repeatedly teUs him over the years that 
the crime way of life is not for him. When "C" is seventeen, 
Soimy even saves his life. 

Lorenzo (De Niro), as the "threatened" father tries time 
and time again to keep his boy away fi-om Sonny. He tells 
"C" that people don't love Sonny like he thinks, they just fear 
him. "C" is not convinced and continues to sneak in order to 
be with Sonny. It's fairly easy for "C" to be with Sonny as 
the bar that is Sonny's territory is next door to where "C 
lives. 

De Niro's performance as the "average" father is up to 
his usual standards. Although his role is stiTaller in compari- 

Napolitano quickly retorted, "Hunny, your not getting mar- 
ried, it's a gun!" 

The most intense moment of the show, was during the 
track "Wendy," fi-om Bloodletting. As she sang with her 
long black hair curtaining her face completely, she drew the 
audience into her, holding not only their breath but a few 
tears for the beauty of the song. 

The band didn't get on stage until midnight, but the 
performance was worth the four hour wait. 

For me, it is sad to hear the band has aimoimced that 
the new album will be the last. The members have agreed 
to break up and move on. 

According to an article in The Providence Phoenix, 
Mankey said "Every album we've done, for some reason or 
another, has had the potential to be our last one. Sbmehow 
we made it this long, but this will probably be it." 

As for going solo, Napolitano said, also in (he Phoe- 
nix, she doesn't feel she is cut out for it but wants to "do 
something edgier and atmospheric, a little more mysterious. 
I want to use my voice more like an instrument, experiment 
a little more." 



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PREGNANCY 

Consider All Your Options.. 
We Support Your Choice. 

Counseling, Housing, and Medical 
Assistance Available. 

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1-800-533-4346 

Confidentiality Respected 



De Niro excels in A Bronx Tale 



son, his position is something that any man could identify 
with. Whatcouldbemorethreateningtoamanthantothink 
your only son looks up to someone else more than you? 
Lorenzo won't even call his son "C", the nickname Soimy 
gave him, but instead calls him by his fiill name of Calogero. 
The one thing Lorenzo continually tells his son is that "the 
saddest thing is wasted talent." He is afi-aid Calogero will 
take the wrong path for easy money. 

The influence Sonny' has over him is never more 
apparent than when "C" wants to date a black girl. All of 
"C" 's buddies hate blacks, to the point of beating them when 
they ride through the neighborhood on their bikes. "C" 
knows he will be ostracized by everyone including his father 
if he admits he wants to date Jane, a beautiful, black girl. 
When he asks Sonny for advice. Sonny tells him to follow 
his heart. After all he says, "A good one comes along once 
in ten years." 

The screenplay, written by Chazz Palminteri (who also 
plays Sonny) is semi-autobiographical and is timeless in its 
message. Although the story is set in the 1960's the themes 
are justaspoignantandpowerfiil today. It's about breaking 
down barriers, and things not being what they appear. 

Without giving away the ending or the surprise cameo 
role, "C" eventually comes to terms with the two men in his 
life. The movie is told through the eyes of "C", with "C" 
narrating over various scenes as an adult today, looking 
back. He says that the biggest thing he learned from Sonny 
was to give and get love unconditionally, and that the 
saddest thing is wasted talent. It's all in the choices you 
make. Lorenzo comes to terms with Sonny's influence in 
Calogero's life and realizes it wasn't all bad. For the first 
time in the mo-vie, he calls his son "C" and tells him that he 
never hated Sonny, he was just mad at him for making his 
son grow up too fast. 

This is one of the best dramas I've seen in a long time. 
De Niro has proven he has the ability to excel both in firont j 
of the camera and behind. I'm always amazed at how an \ 
artist is able to do both simultaneously and to do them to 
perfection as well. It looks like a new era is dawning for De 
Niro, and A Bronx Tale is just the beginning. 



Women's Page 



Mainsheet November 18, 1993 page IS 



Women armed with weapons Toni Morrison 

breaks 'the si- 
lence in literature' 



by KATIE BAN IS 

Women's Issues Editor 



According to the Secretary of State's office, suicide and 
homicide have resulted in over 50,000 deaths annually 
between 1985 and 1990 and victims of violence have ex- 
ceeded 2 million persons annually. 

As the years progress the sense of security for women 
and their families continue to decreases. Violent and abusive 
behaviors contiaue to be major 
causes of death, injury, and 
stressintheUnitedStates. With 
this rise in violence women have 
resorted to taking steps in de- 
fending themselves, including 
arming themselves with weap- 
ons. 

Women are trying to pro- 
tect themselves in numerous 
ways, learning self-defense, 
arming themselves with guns, 
whistles, mace and pepper 
spray. 

"I have been interested in 
taking self defense classes for a 
long time, they seem to be the 
best measure of safety for 
women these days," said com- 
munications student Sheila 
Johnson. "It beats canying a 
gun!" 

These defenses are not al- 
ways effective or easy to ob- 
tain, certain states restrict the use of potential security 
devices. There are also many concerns that an assailant can 
turn the wes^n on the victim. 

The Police warned Diane Sawyer, of Prime Time Live, 
and her viewers, "don't get a gun as an empty threat." One 




convicted criminal told Ms. Sawyer that, "if you don't shoot 
me right away when you pull it out, I'H take it from you." 
Should women resort to carrying guns? With one 
million muggings in the United Stated last year more and 
more women feel it is necessary. "But most of the time the 
owner doesn't have a chance to get to the gun," says Ms. 
Sawyer. There are presently 2 million guns in the United 
States. That is one gun per man, women, and child. Only 34 
states have gun control laws. Two dozen cities offer money 
for guns returned to the police. One city fines the manufac- 
turer if the gun is used in an 
armed robbery. 

"I believe the woman 
has the right to carry a gun as 
long as she has proper training, 
and realizes the dangers of car- 
rying a weapon," said Liberal 
Arts student Michele Ryan. "It 
Icoidd be used against her." 

"Forty-three percent of 
guns are more likely to used in 
accidents," quotes Ms. Sawyer. 
Ms. Sawyer interviewed Sondra 
Bams a mother of two. Ms. 
Bams left the gun box unlocked 
for 30 seconds. In those 30 
seconds the oldest of her chil- 
dren shotthe 14month old baby 
brother paralyzing him from the 
waist down. 

Masters of Self Defense in 
Centerville. 

Forty-eight percent of 
Americans owning guns in their 
homes. In the town of Barnstable- Deputy Chief Tamash 
reported that there are 1624 pistol permits. With these 
figures in mind, "no wonder women are arming themselves," 
said a student Louise Bolupis. 



'I want to hold your hand,--may I?' 



by ADA KELLEY 



A roinaiitic eiicoiiiiter could conjure up iniayes of 
moonlit e\ eiiiiiys. exotic scents and walks on the beach but 
the issue of acquaintance rape has put an element of fear 
into romance. 

Ill the past, women grew up scarred by warnings 
about strangers. Today, the warnings are against acquain- 
tances. .4 recent Time article states"that while one in four 
women will be raped in her lifetime, the assault by a 
monstrous stranger, accounts for only one out of fne 
attacks." 

The rest of the cases are described as "acquaintance 
rape."" or forced sex between people that know each other. 

A recent Supreme Court ruling expands the defi- 
nition of sexual harassment to include words (alone) that 
are hostile. per\asi\e. harassing and frequent enough to be 
threatening or humiliating and the accuser does not have to 
pro\e psychological harm. 

This ruling forces men to rethink their approach to 



women, to change their image from that of conqueror to 
one whorespects another"! rights. The ruling makes it e\ en 
more important to gain consent before making any gesture 
that could be misconstrued as harassment. Likewise, women 
will ha\e totake responsibility for their actions if they give 
consent. 

"How can you make sex completely politically 
correct and completely safe'.'"" asked Newsweek jouViialist, 
Stephanie Gutmann. She wonders how "people can ha\e 
erotic or desire-dri\ en sex" with all the rules that surround 
the date-rape issue. 

"You must obtain consent e\ ery step of the way." 
said an Antioch College women's advocate. 

One idea for obtaining consent surfaced as a 
"Consensual Sex Contract" which included a disclaimer 
that states neither of the consenting parties "may claim to 
be the \ictini of sexual harassment, assault or rape as a 
result" of signing the agreement. Too bad if one partner 
said no after signing this agreement. 

So where does this leaxe the dating population'.' 
Looking forromance armed with consensual contracts and 
banana flavored condoms' 



Please fill out the following survey and return to the MainSheet 
office. The results will be used in another article on this subject. 

SEX 



WOULD YOU DEFINE THE FOLLOWING AS RAPE? 

▲ After an evening of drinking , the woman 
passes out, the man has sex with her 

A A married man insists on having sex with his 
wife when she does not wish to 

▲A man argues with his date until she 
reluctantly agrees to have sex 

▲A man pleads and uses emotional pressure 
to get a woman to have sex 

▲Do some women like to be persuaded into 
having sex 



RAPE 



NOT RAPE 



by MELISSA PHANEUF 

Staff Writer 



As the Swedish Academy announced this October the 
winner of the 1993 Nobel Prize in literature, women every- 
where were quite pleased, especially Ms. Toni Morrison. 

Morrison is the first black American and the eighth 
woman to win the prestigious prize. Morrison has based her 
six novels on black females, young and old. According to an 
Essence magazine, she has been identified by some as the 
only contemporary black feminist American Novelist. 

Chloe Anthony Wofford was bom in 1931 to working 
class parents, she was one of four children and grew up in 
poverty, she helped her family by getting jobs beginning at 
the age of 1 2. She changed her name to Toni Morrison upon 
attending the (then) all-black university Howard. She later 
wentontoComellwhereshereceivedherM.A.in 1955. She 
spent several years teaching at Howard, Harvard, and cur- 
rently at Princeton University. 

Her first novel was published in 1970, The Bluest Eye, 
followed by Sula(1974), Songs of Soloman (1977), Tar Baby 
(1981), Beloved (1987), and most recently Jazz (1992). The 
stories reflect her Midwestern upbringing, and they contain 
a hint of the historical and social pressures A^ch she faced 
as a young woman. According to the Associated 

Press, Morrison said she was inspired by, "huge silences in 
literature, things that have never been articulated, printed or 
imagined, and they were sUences about black girls, black 
women." 

The wiiming of this award by Morrison is a big step for 
women, and for people of color. Someday everyone will 
realize that people are all people: black or \^te, man or 
woman, rich or poor. 



THE NIGHT THOREAU SPENT IN JAIL 



by Jerome 
La-wrence and 
Robert E. Lee 

Will be pre- 
sented in Reader's 
Theater/Chamber 
Theater styles on 
Sunday December 5 
at 2:00 in the Stu- 
dio Theater. Gen- 
eral admission is 
$4.00, students, seniors, and CCCC 
family admission is $3.00. Please call 
the Box Office 362-6925 for tickets or 
purchase tickets at the door. 




EX! 






o 
U 
<u 

a. 

u 



Free Pregnancy Testing 

Non-Judgemental 

Guidance 

Support Groups 




pq 



298 Main Street, Hyannis 

800-439-1172 
771-1102 



page 16 Mainsheet November 18. 1993 



Back Page 



Music and Arts: 

Hyannis Center 
Theatre Company lo- 
cated in Richard's Gal- 
lery at the comer of 
Ocean and Main St., 
Hyannis, will open it's 
season during Thanks- 
giving week. The open- 
ing production will be 
the World Premiere of 
"Geronimo" Nov. 24 - 
28 and again Dec. 3 & 
4. All performances are 
at 8p.m. Tickets are $12 
for adults and S8 for 
seniors and students. 
For reservations call 
(508) 790-1431. Tick- 
ets also available at 
CCCC, JFK Museum 
and Puritan's. 



Brown 
Events: 



Bag 



This year's theme: 
Multiculturalism Weds. 



What's Happening 



at noon & Thurs. at 12:30 
Tilden Arts Center lobby 

Seminars & Work- 
shops: 

Awakening the Sa- 
cred Feminine 

6 week experimental 
class for women who want 
support in bringing forth the 
wild woman and honoring the 
goddess within. Fridays be- 
ginning Oct. 22nd, 7:30-9:30 
p.m. Sliding scale fee. For 
info call Cunjan Laborde, 
563-7575 or JoEUen Rice, 
362-8968 

The Goddess and 
Women's Self-Esteem 
workshop 

Nov. 20th, 10 a.m. -4 
p.m. Registration limited to 
15 participants. Fee: $80 in- 
cluding limch and supplies. 
For info . and registration call 
255-3811. 

MBTI TYPE Work- 



shops, Fall '93 

Introductory Work- 
shops: Nov. 30th & Dec. 2nd 
9:30- 11:00 a.m. in LI 02. 

Issues Workshops:(For 
participants who have taken 
MBTI) Dec 8th, 2-3 p.m. in 
LI 02 Type and Careers 

Dealing with stress 
workshop: 

weekly meetings Wed 
& Thurs. 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. 
Upper Commons Classes are 
free and open to all students. 
Sponsored by the Adult Re- 
entry Center. 

Poetry Contests: 
The National Library 
of Poetry 

To enter send one origi- 
nal poem, andy subject or 
style to The National Library 
of Poetry, 11419 Cromidge 
Dr.,P.O.Box704-ZI,Owings 
MiUs,MD 21117 

Intramural Sports 



& Activities: 

Bodyworks class 

Low impact aerobics, 
step, cardiovascular condi- 
tioning, gutbusters and ton- 
ing, stretching and relaxation, 
nutritioninfo. Mon-Wed-Fri, 
1 1 to 12p.m. in the gym. 

Basketball 

Tues. & Thurs. 1 1-4 

Volleyball 

Mon. & Fri. 2-4 

Indoor Soccer 

Wed. & Fri. 12-2 

Floor Hockey 

Mon. & Fri. 2-4 



All sign-up sheets for 
intermural sports are posted 
in the Life Fitness Center. 

Club News: 



Loon Mtn. 

The Ski Club invites 
you to ski Loon Mtn. Nov. 
26, $20 for students, $25 for 
guests. Includes ride & lift. 

Killington, Vermont 

Dec3-5. $119includes 
2 nights lodging, lifts andride. 
For more info on ski trips 
contact Diane Grondin, Fi- 
nancial Aid office, ext. 393 

Crew Club 

Join our school's most 
organized, conditioned, and 
elite yet least heralded club. 
Contact Loretta Santangelo 
(team advisor) in the Life 
Fitness Center. 

Club Lacrosse 

New practice schedule 
-Fall 

Fridays from 2:30 to 4 
:00 p.m.(bad weather - in the 
gym). Last practice will be 
Dec. 10th. 



Spring practice and 
games: M-W-F from 
2:30 to 4:30 p.m. 

During February, 
Fridays only, in the gym. 

1st Game 

CCCC LAX vs 
Mount Ida College 

Wed., Apr. 27th at 
3:30. Bus leaves at 1:30 
p.m. 

Gay-Bi Lesbian 
Club 

Tues. 1-2 p.m. Up- 
per Commons, CI 06 

Off Campus 
Activities: 

Holiday Fair 

Games, food, mu- 
sic, crafts andmuch more 
Sat. Nov. 20th 10-4 
p.m.Waldorf School of 
Cape Cod Trowbridge 
Rd., Bourne. For info, 
call 759-7499. 



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EARN YOUR 4 YEAR COLLEGE 
DEGREE ON CAPE COD 

Finish your Associate Degree at 
Cape Cod Community College, 
then 

..pursue undergraduate 
programs in Business, Liberal 
Studies or Criminal Justice, 
Continue working toward a 
Masters in Business Administration^ 
or a Master of Science in Criminal 
Justice Administration, 




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Barnstable Village 
508-362-4936 



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Resumes, term papers, etc. Quality work, , 

professional results, reasonable rates. 

Quick Turnaround. 

(508) 295-7048 



RACISM & SEXISM IN THE 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE 



Thursday 

November 18, 1993 

12:30-1:30 

NG8 



Learn how to recognize subtle racist and sexist comments. 
Become aware of how prejudiced thinking permeates ourcuUurtt 



Please feet free to bring your lunch! 



Presented by Project Advance/SSSP 



i 




Chancellor claims 
standards lax 

Pages 



Happy Holly-Daze 



Page 7 





)TN SHFFT 



December 9, 1993 



Issue no.5 Volume XVII 



Cape Cod Community College West Barnstable, MA 



Distributed FREE 



Smoking room temporarily condemned 



by BRIAN FORD 

Staff Writer 



Apparent vandalism led to the 
closing of the smoking room as it was 
found in shambles on November 16. 

Dean of Student Services Rich- 
ard Sullivan and Student Activities 
Director John French considered clos- 
ing the room permanently but reluc- 
tantly opted to give it another chance. 

Custodial workers in the Upper 
Commons discovered the mess; there 
were tables overturned, seat cushions 
thrown around, and garbage all over 
the floor. The custodians locked the 
room and immediately reported it to 
Bob Phillips, Director of Facilities 
Management. 

Maintenance refused to clean 
the room as they felt it was a problem 
fer beyond their realm of duties. 

"The room was trashed," Mr. 
Phillips said. "This was something I thought was a student 
problem so I called Dean Sullivan and left it up to him." 

Dean Sullivan promptly closed the room until further 
notice, then asked the Student Senate and the MainSheet to 
view the room and report any information about the incident. 
"In my 24 years at this college, this is the first time I ever 
witnessed such a wanton act of destruction," Dean Sullivan 
said. "I was absolutely shocked." 

Following the incident, a group of students who used 
the smoking room on a regular basis volunteered to clean the 
mess and help maintain the room for the remainder of the 




Connector approved for 
spring construction 



Thanks to student volunteers tlie smoking room Is now open. From left 
to right: Erica Muncey, Rob Turner, Bill Lajoie, Benjamin Wall, and Amy 
Gold. r 

semester. The room was opened again on the following 
Monday and has been in use ever since. 

Not everyone, however, believes the room was debb- 
erately vandalized. John French feels that people were 
wrestling in the room and selfishly decided to ignore the 
mess they made. Mr. French also believes that it probably 
was not even a CCCC student. 

"I don't think any of our students would do that," Mr. 
French said. "With so many years without an incident 
involving vandalism, it just doesn't seem that a student at this 
college would deliberately vandalize and abuse that privi- 
lege," Mr. French added. 



Possible expansion on campus 'priority projects 



by JOHN WHITE 

Staff Writer 



CCCC must decide if it wants to participate in a 
Massachusetts-wide priority projects program that would 
give the college $10,945,000. The funds would be used to 
expand off-campus and to renovate the current facilities. 
They would also improve and start several academic pro- 
grams. 

The projects program, which may be the only oppor- 
tunity the College will have this decade to deal with its' space 
and technology problems, could result in an increase in 
student fees. The state Health and Educational Facilities 
Authority vnll fund half of the almost $11 million appropri- 
ated for the College, and the College must come up with the 
other half 

President Kraus discussed the program in two College- 
wide forums and a press conference. 

President Kraus said that $5.5 million is earmarked for 
the acquisition of the KAO building in downtown Hyannis. 
It would be converted into an academic building. This would 
give the College much needed classroom space, and help it 
accommodate academic programs the state would like to see 
CCCC improve. 

The state wants the College to expand the health-care 
related programs, and begin programs in marine and environ- 
mental sciences. There would be expansions of laboratory 
and library space to carry these programs. A state of the ait 
language lab and teleconferencing facility would also be 
added. 



President Kraus explained that the "best minds at the 
College" will design apian on how to get the most out of the 
state appropriated funds while minimizing the impact on 
students. An early draft of the plan will come out in 
February for all to see. 

After getting comments and criticisms from the fac- 
ulty and student body. President Kraus and his staff will 
revise the plan. The College does not have to make a final 
decision on whether it wants to be involved in the program 
until the end of spring semester. 



'We don't want to increase (tu- 
ition and fees) another penny, but, 
in reality, we liave to decide if it's 
wortli it to participate in tlie pro- 
gram.' 



There was no estimate of apossible fee increase, but 
President Kraus admitted that fees could outweigh tuition. 
"It would be up to the Higher Education Coordinating 
Council," President Kraus said. 

"We don't want to increase (tuition and fees) another 
penny," he stated,"but, in reality, we have to decide if it's 
worth it (to participate in the program)." 

President Kraus stated that there might be alternatives 
to raising student fees. One option is issuing bonds to invest 



by Brian Ford 

Staff Writer 

A building connector which will join North and Soudi 
Halls together is scheduled for construction next semester. It 
will include a new elevator, handicap restrooms, and a 
hallway which will join the ground and first floor of the two 
buildings together. 

A state funded project budgeted at $900,000, the 
connector construction has been on hold since 1988. Al- 
though no contractor has been chosen yet to complete the 
project, the college and the state have agreed to break ground 
on it sometime this Spring. 

"Right now we have a verbal agreement with the state 
to expect the project to start by March of 1994," said Bob 
Phillips, Director of Facilities Management at CCCC. 

Constructing the connector will bring drastic change 
to the entrances of North and South Hall. The entire area 
between the first floor of the two buildings will be removed 
to make room for the new connector. 



'We've been trying to get this 
project off the ground for five 
years now and it would be a real 
advantage for the students if it's 
completed as soon as possible.' 



Indoor hallways will join the two buildings together 
on two levels, and an elevator will be installed to accommo- 
date all three floors of both buildings. The outdoor stairway 
on the side of North Hall will be removed and the ground 
entrance to South Hall will be moved forward 20 feet. 

The sitting area in front of South Hall will be elimi- 
naledtp accommodate handicap parking. Handicap restrooms 
will also be installed with the connector. With the new 
elevator, these facilities will make the buildings much more 
accessible to handicapped and disabled students. 

A victim of Massachusetts' budget crunch over the 
past few years, the connector project has been put off since 
1988, when it was budgeted at $800,000. Because of the 
state's poor economy, funds have not been available to 
begin the project, although the blueprints were completed 
some years ago. 

"Hopefully they're serious this time," Mr. Phillips 
said. "We've been trying to get this project off the ground 
for five years now and it would be a real advantage for the 
students if it's completed as soon as possible." 



in the Colleges' expansion. Another is improving the 
summer school program by installing air conditioning to all 
classrooms. This would keep students from feeling like they 
are "c^ed up in aroom" during the hot simuner months and 
increase enrollment. Private contributions could also relieve 
some of the financial burden. President Kraus said. 

The program was met with caution by fwjulty and 
students. One faculty member wondered how the College 
would be able to staff and maintain a new building with no 
increase in the operating budget. There were concerns ex- 
pressed with the proposed marine and environmental science 
program. A faculty member wondered if it would qualify 
students to be anything more than "dishwashers on Woods 
Hole." 

President Kraus admitted that, at this stage, there are 
more questions than ansvvers. 

continued on page 2 



page 2 Mainsbeet December 91993 



Campus News 



The Brown Bag opens 

Reveals talented students and faculty 



by TERRI LADD 

Staff Writer 



In the true spirit of ait and 
self-expression a dozen poets 
gathered to share their emo- 
tions. Professor Barry McPhee 
hosted the event and hailed 
poetry as the "queen of the arts." 

A combination of students 
and professors read original 
works in the lobby of the Tilden 
Arts Center, Thursday, Novem- 
ber 18th. The audience was 
both attentive and approving. 
For many of the poets this was 
not their first time to read in 
public. 

"I've read in area coffee 
houses and feel quite comfort- 
able in front of people," said 
theater arts major Michael Abdow. 

Mr. Abdow possessed full command of the microphone 
and used his theatrical skills to captivate his audience. 

When asked if he would like to see any of his works 
published Mr. Abdow said, "Even though I know a pub- 
lisher, I haven't pursued publication. After some reflection 
my 'masterpiece' just doesn't measure up to me anymore." 

The poets seriously used the open mike format to 
express what was deep inside them. This form of art gave 
otherwise shy people the opportunity to express themselves 
in a non-threatening atmosphere. 

Getrie Wilson, a liberal arts major, said that she still gets 
a "few butterflies" at the poetry readings she has partici- 
pated in. She does feel that the exposure in the college 
setting helps relieve some anxiety over public speaking. 

Amy Gold, a liberal arts major from WeUfleet read a 
poem what she sees as "a gentle expression of love:" 




Pale moonlight through window pane. 

Across your bed its careful aim. 

A shadow moves and tells the tale. 

How love is made in moonlight pale. 

Another student, David Marhefka, majoring in business 
administration, agreed that the college shouldkeep the open- 
mike format available. 

Many people passed through the lobby during the read- 
ings, stopping to Usten before moving oil Students could be 
seen from the balcony intently listening to the poets. No one 
seem distracted by the banging of the heavy lobby doors or 
the ringing of phones from the ofSces upstairs. 

"These are the words we use everyday, in the halls, at 
home, everywhere," said McPhee, "the difference is that 
these words are invested so that they have a different sense 
to them." 



CCCC reaches out to the community 



by TOM REDMOND 

Campus News Editor 



Between North and Main streets in Hyannis center, 
there stands a recently refurbished commercial building. 
The bustling retail business that once occupied its space is 
gone. One of many victims evicted by a harsh economy. 

Rising like a phoenix among the vacant ruins is the 
Cape Cod Community College Adult Learning Center. The 
Center's presence signals not the renewal of commerce but 
a renewal of people. The revitalization of this space is 
symbolic of the Center's mission, which is to revitalize the 
real victims of a demanding economy. Those with marginal 
skills and language barriers ^^^^^^^__-_-^^_ 
who eke out an existence on 
the fringes of society. 

The Adult Learning 
Center stands as a sentinel of 
hope for these beleaguered 
people. "Its' unique educa^ 
tional programs provide a 
bridge of transition into the 
mainstream," said Maureen ^^^ 

Cahill, program coordinator. 

The Center offers two main programs; an Adult Basic 
Education course and English as a Second Language couise. 

The Basic Education Piogram teaches the primary 
skills of reading, writing and math for the undereducated 
segment ofthe community. It is estimated that30,000people 
read at 7th grade level or less in the greater Cape area. "This 
is the last chance for many of them to grab on to the rope," 
said Ms. Cahill. 

There are certain criteria that must be met to qualify 
for this program. Eligibility requires a limited income, 
present unemployment, minimum education, low testing in 
basic skills and have English as a native language. " These 
are people who have fallen through the cracks," said Ms. 
Cahill," they are desperate and this program will help bolster 
up flie bottom line." This program also helps students to 
begin preparation for the G.E.D. High School Equivalency 
exam. Ms. Cahill is a graduate of Providence College and 



'The community needs this pro- 
gram to bridge the education gap 
between the Community Evening 
Programs and college level 
courses' 



earned her Masters in Education at Boston University. 



The English as a Second Language course is coordi- 
nated by Helen Guran. In conjunction with the C^)e Cod 
Literacy Council and the Barnstable Community Schools, 
this program assists those who have limited English profi- 
ciency make the transition to College level coiffses. The 
program provides instruction in reading comprehension, 
vocabulary and writing. There are an estimated 3,000 to 
5,000 families in the Cape area that could benefit from this 
program. 

" The commimity needs this program to bridge the 
education gap between the Community Evening Programs 
and college level courses," said Ms. Guran. Ms. Guran has 
worked with English as a Second Language and Adult Basic 
Education for six years. She 
eamed her Bachelor's degree 
in Art from UMass/Amherst 
and is currently studying for 
her Masters degree in Train- 
ing and Development through 
Lesley College. 

Both these programs 
utilize an innovative technol- 
__^_^^^_^^^_____ ogy called Nova-Net. It is a 
computer system which is 
plugged into a bank of lessons at the University of Dlmois. 
This computer classroom provides for a highly individual 
and self-paced learning process. 

The Adidt learning Center is supported by a network 
ofState, Local and Federal funds. It also receives assistance 
from JTEC, The Regional Employment Board of Cjqje Cod 
and the Islands, Cape Cod Literacy Council and CCCC. 

This program was conceived over several years with 
the help of Peter Birkel, Dean of Community Services, 
David Ziemba, Director of Academic Support Services and 
Scott Himstead, Publisher ofthe Cape Cod Times. 

"It fills an acute need ofthe community to assist those 
on the fringes of society into active and productive mem- 
bers," said Pat Wild, Director ofthe fecility. Ms. Wild has 
an extensive backgrotmd in corporate af&irs, public admin- 
istration and marketing. " with the support and vision ofthe 
college and the community, we have an opportunity to do 
something very special," said Ms. Wild. 



News Briefs 



Sea Change 

CCCC's magazine ofthe arts is accepting submissions for 

its 1995 issue. See door of N 237 for detaUs. 

Two masters degree weekend study programs offered 

Salem State College and the Cape Cod Center for Gradu- 
ate Education on the CCCC campus will run again 
startingin the fall of 1994. The programs are Reading and 
School Administration, open to certified teachers. For 
information contact Richard Nastri, 362-2131 ext.380. 

CCCC/Federated Church schedule Choral Evensong 

Under the direction of Robert W. Kidd, the Federated 
Church and the CCCC Choir and Chorus will perform 
"The Christmas Oratorio" and "A Festival of Lessons and 
Carols" on Dec.l2th at 6p.m. in the church at 320 Main 
Street, Hyannis. There will be a free will offering. Due 
to limited seating, admission is reservation only. For 
reservations call the church at 775-0298 or the CCCC box 
office at 362-6925. 

New Tech Prep Leader 

Harwich school committee chairman, Vahan J. 
Khachadoorian has been named coordinator of the Tech 
Prep program at CCCC, succeeding Marie Devlin who 
resigned in August. 

Public meeting for Otis cleanup 

On Wednesday Dec. 8 from 7-9 p.m. in room 1 at tiie 
Sandwhich Public library, the National Guard Bureau is 
sponsoring an in formal meeting about the clean up at 
Otis. For more info call Douglas Karson at (508) 968- 
4678. 



Racism and sexism 
in language 

by JAYME WOOD 

Staff Writer 

Recently, Lee Hamilton professor ofthe Race, Class 
and Culture in the U.S., lectured on the dangers of racism and 
sexism in everyday language. Racist and sexist language 
leads to prejudice thinking which can lead to discrimination. 
"One of the dangers of prejudice thinking," Professor 
Hamilton said, "is that we eliminate people and their input in 
our society." 

According to Professor Hamilton, one of the biggest 
dangers is the use of loaded words. Terms such as; the under 
class, imdeveloped, uncultured, and the weaker sex are all 
terms used to lessen the worth of anyone who isn't a wealthy 
white male. "We pretend there isn't a class structure in this 
society," she said, "but there is." 

Commercials are another source of racist and sexist 
input, she said, because commercials reinforce stereotypes 
and gender roles. They lead people to believe that they 
should strive for unrealistic standards ofbeauty, she said, and 
that they are ugly if they don't look like the models in the 
commercials. "If the ideal of beauty is the- blond, thin 
woman," Professor Hamilton said, "then all other groups 
become invisible." 

Anyone interested in learning more about racism and 
sexism should consider taking tiie class the next time it is 
offered. 



expansion 

continued from front page 

In order to be eligible for the fimds, the state demanded 
that the College obtain certificates of occupancy for all its' 
buildings. The College cuirently does not have an occu- 
pancy permit. In order to comply with state building codes, 
the College must enlarge the present classrooms. This will 
cause the loss of eight classrooms, further adding to the 
current space problems the college abeady faces. 




if |i" 



Caiht)iils Nfetvs 



Mainsheet December 9, 1993 page 3 



Daniel Webster "I Still Live!" 



by JENNIFER DIXON 

Staff Writer. 



Taking a stroll down leg- 
end lane, historian and pro- 
fessional actor Jim Cooke 
portrays the life of the noble 
and dedicated government 
activist Daniel Webster in the 
play , "Daniel Webster: 

'I Still Live!"' 

Webster's life as ahusband 
and father, and role as a leader 
and orator were portrayed to 
the audience through the tal- 
ents of Mr. Cooke. This solo 
performance focused on the 
historical importance and life 
trials of Webster, a 19th cen- 
tury forefather to American 
Government. 

The performance was a dra- 




matic history les- 
son that enhanced 
the realism that 
Webster once rep- 
re seated to his 
government and 
people. Mr. 
Cooke's insight 
on Webster's life 
filled the theater 
withanlSOO'sau- 
rora. The lan- 
guage and tone 
was that ofanoble 
historian who 

strongly stood up for such The play touched on the 
controversial topics as anti- struggles that Webster en- 
slavery and preservation of deavored to make sure his 
the union. voice was heard in govern- 



ment issues. 

Mr. Cooke has been per- 
forming historical produc- 
tions since 1985. In addition 
to Daniel Webster, Cooke is 
also well known for his por- 
trayal of Calvin Coolidge. 

Although Cooke's original 
plans were that of an actor, 
which he successfully accom- 
plished, he has become a 
knowledgeable historian 
through his performances. 

In the future, Mr. Cooke 
said he may possibly add in 
other characters of historical 
importance to his plays, 
which would fiirther praise 
and acknowledge these leg- 
endary historians. 



The mind and 
body connection 



by MARTHA LOVE 

Staff Writer 

When Yoga is mentioned it brings to mind certain poses 
such as standing on ones head or imitating an animal. 
Meditation is another idea that yoga evokes. On Thursday 
night, Nov. 1 1th, Katherine Trainor Bradley, M.Ed, a certi- 
fied Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapist, spoke on the Mind- 
Body coimection of yoga as an alternative tixeiapy. 

The seminar, which was sponsored by the Center for 
Successful Aging, was attended by amixed group of people. 
Ms. Bradley was introduced by Carta Priest firom the Center. 

Ms. Bradley spoke of the '90s as a decade of mind and 
body connection. Although yoga is an ancient art over 5000 
years old, it combines contemporary elements of treating the 
body and the mind. The mind is a "refined body" Ms. 
Bradley stated. She then went on to explain that yoga comes 
from the Sanskrit word "yug", which means "to join." 
Meaning who we truly are with our mind or body. 



'Although yoga is an ancient art 

No, they don't graduate; well almost never ^"^^^ ^^^^ years ow, it combines 

contemporary elements of treat- 
ing the body and the mind/ 



by MARK POLSELLI 

Staff Writer 



Who wants to go to a school where the students don't 
graduate? According to Registrar Martin Grace and the 
National Center for Educa- ^ 



'The Registrar's office show that 
of the 5000 students who at- 
tended classes last year, only 377 
graduated.' 



tion Statistics, most com- 
munity college students wiU 
never get a degree. 

Numbers released from 
the Registrar's office show 
that of the 5000 students 
who attended classes last 
year, only 377 graduated. i^^-^— 

This graduation rate has re- 
mained steady for the last 5 years. With an 8% graduation 
rate, the obvious question is how many students transfer to 4 
year colleges? Both Mr. Grace and Ernest J. Cole Jr., the 
Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs, say transfer rates are 
not recorded and are unavailable. 

However, some of the major findings of the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Education, in a survey report revealed: 

- Less than one-tenth of 1980 high school graduates who 
entered less-than-4-year institutions attained bachelor's de- 
grees by 1986. 

- When students delayed entry into 2 or 4-year institutions, 



their subsequent attainment of a bachelor's degree was far' 
below the students who entered immediately from high 
school. 

- Of the 1980 high school graduates who inunediately 
entered 4-year colleges, about 4 of every 7 stayed in school, 

and 75% of them attained 

"bachelor's degrees in 4 years. 

Because graduation rates are 
considered by many as an indi- 
cation of a college's success, 
these statistics are vital for stu- 
dents deciding where they will 
go to school. 
_ Congress considers gradua- 



tion rates important enough to 
enact legislation this summer called the "Student Right to 
Know and Campus Security Act." The new law, which 
requires colleges to report graduation and crime rates, took 
effect after colleges had successfully lobbied for its one year 
delay. Colleges that do not comply with this law risk losing 
federal student aid programs. 

There is disagreement on what defines success, and the 
importance of graduation data. But, if a specific part of 
CCCC mission is to provide high quality, low cost education 
for students planning to continue tiieir education, these facts 
become significant. 



Ms. Bradley explained that there were many theories on 
how yoga began. It is surmised that people noticed the 
fluidity and suppleness innate in animals such as the camel, 
the cobra, the eagle, and the lion, as well as the way the 
animals breathed. 

She explained the many types of yoga, Patanja, Hatha, 
and Rasha, to name a few. Hatha is probably the best known 
as it has been Westernized. 

She said, "Breath is Life, as you breathe so shall you 
live." It is important to keep this in mind as one is doing the 
Asanas or postures for they work together. Along with breath 
she suggests a mantra to use in doing one's breathing. The 
concept appears to be quite simple in this Holistic age. One 
can be any age or size. Suppleness comes through work. 
Yoga is very empowering; the only limitations are in our 
mind. 

Ms. Bradley teaches three classes. One class she teaches 
is here at the college. For more information, Ms. Bradley 
may be reached at 428-0723 . 



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Chancellor claims college admission standards lax 



by ADA KELLEY 

Staff Writer 



Massachusetts college officials have compensated for the 
decline in the number of £q)plicants by lowering their admis- 
sion standards, according to Stanley Z. Koplik, the Higher 
Education Chancellor. 

A recent article in the Boston Globe cited the Chancellor' s 
concerns that the drop in standards decreases the credibility 
of public colleges and sets unskilled students on a path 
headed towards failure. 

'Schools need to be flexible and 
not rule out students deserving of 
a four-year experience.' 

The Globe article quoted Chancellor Koplik as he ad- 
dressed flie Higher Education Coordinating Council; "There 
are far too many exceptions... (unskilled students) would do 
far better to get their feet planted at a community college and 
gain maturity and get used to the college experience." 

Confirming a drop in SAT scores, the University of 
Massachusetts released statistics in November showing that 
freshman scores have declined steadily from 1989 to 1992 
but stabilized last year. 

The Globe article also noted that budget cuts and higher 
tuition has caused a four year decline in enrollments which 
were followed by a slight increase this fall. Also noted were 



state college officials' defense of their admission record, 
citing statistics that showed fairly stable SAT scores and 
class ranks. But many nontraditional students are exempted 
from standard admission guidelines because SAT scores and 
class rank are not valid measures. 

Here at CCCC, Registrar Martin Grace noted that al- 
though SAT scores are not an issue for entrance to the 
college, the drop in standards "creates a domino effect." He 
noted that if the four year colleges drop admission standards, 
students will skip the preparatory courses and guidance that 
are available at junior colleges. Students plunge ahead only 
to discover that they can not make the grade and some get 
discouraged and drop out. 

Hosni A. Nabi, Dean of Academic Affairs said, "Our 
institutions are able to meet our social responsibility of 
working with s^ students. Many of our students are non- 
traditional students with an average age of 28." He further 
stated that, "community colleges are open admission institu- 
tions. Students are accepted at various levels of preparation. 
These colleges offer courses, programs and other educa- 
tional services to individuals who need improvement in the 
basic skills..." 

As the number of high school applicants drpp, there has 
been an increase in the number of older students who have 
been admitted to local and national public colleges. But the 
decline in enrollments are seen at the higher education level 
where budgets have been cut over the last several years. The 
Globe noted that total emollment declined 5 percent from 
1988 to 1992. 



Chancellor Koplik fiirther said "to take ill-prepared stu- 
dents directly from high school into the state colleges or 
university is not to run an efficient system." He added, "If 
we raise the high bar of expectations, students will get over 
it." Since he became chancellor in July, one of his priorities 
is a detailed review of standards. 

Urging that more emphasis be placed on students' aca- 
demic work, Framingham State College Dean Philip said 
"Schools need to be flexible and not rule out students 
deserving of a four-year experience." 

UMass Lowell president, William Hogan acknowledged 



These colleges offer courses, pro- 
grams and other educational ser- 
vices to individuals who need im- 
provement in the basic skills..." 

that enrollments and qualifications have dropped as the 
economy has slipped. He mentioned that the school has 
accepted 75 percent of ^plicants when in the past only 50 
percent were accepted. He further stated that enrollment 
dropped 22 percent since 1988 which made the lowering of 
standards essential to keeping the school open. He agrees 
with Chancellor Koplik's belief in the importance of higher 
standards. As the Chancellor said "We advertise the pursuit 
of quality. Iwant to seemore ofit" 



page 4 Mainsheet December 9, 1993 



■ *t fSA t T» r 1 



Editbtial 



The spirit of Santa Claus endures 



by ERIN ROSE 

Staff Writer 



Each year at about this time I begin to bombard everyone 
around me with Christmas music, decorations, and anything 
that has to do with Santa. When I was eight years old, my 
father inspired these sentiments in me with his creativeness. 

At this time, I was starting to doubt if Santa Claus really 
existed or not. On top of my new found doubts my family was 
moving into a new house, and I was convinced that Santa 
would never find the house. 

I am the oldest of four children so I didn't have an older 
brother or sister to tell me He wasn't real, as older siblings 
like to do. 

I was definitely naive, and although I wanted to believe I 
was having trouble understanding the finer points of Santa's 
trip. 

I didn't understand how he got to all the houses in the 
world in one night, or how he got into houses without 
chimneys. All the things the little kids all over worry about 
when they get old enough to question fantasy. 

My father knew how anxious I was and wanted the 
Christmas spirit and Santa to live on for me. Christmas Eve 
he sent me to bed and told me if I believed in Santa then he 
would leave some kind of proof that he was there. 

I went to sleep believing with all my heart Wanting so 
badly to remain a child, at least at Christmas time. 



When 1 awoke the next morning, I raced out into the living 
room and saw all the presents under the illuminated tree. I 
saw the cookie crumbs on the plate where I had left cookies 
and milk. 1 saw the carrots I had left out for the reindeer were 
gone. 

What I didn't see was any unquestionable proof that Santa 
Claus had really been there. I went upstairs to wake my 
parents. 1 was so disappointed, and almost didn't want to 
celebrate at all. 

When my father was awake, he told me to put my sneakers 
on and go out and get something out of the car. When I 
opened the front door and stepped out onto the snow, I 
noticed small footprints everywhere. 

They were all over the firont yard and they went right up 
onto the roof. I was amazed, they were reindeer prints. This 
was all the proof I needed to know for years to come that 
Santa was real. I even convinced some of my doubting 
school mates with my story. 

Years later I asked my father how he had made the tracks. 
Come to find out he had borrowed adeer leg, which was part 
of a gun rack, fi-om one of his fiiends and got out there late 
at night and made tracks everywhere. He even took a ladder 
and made them on the roof as a finishing touch. 

I was amazed that he took the time and trouble just to keep 
me believing for another few years. 

Now I know that as well as allowing me to continue 
believing, he made the Christmas spirit something I will 
always treasure. 




Editorial Staff 



Sheila Johnson 
Michele Queenan 
Kevin Moulton 
Beverly Delaney 
Bryan Russell 
David Whitmore 
Jack Higgins 
Tom Redmond 
Katie Banis 
Vincent Raimo 
Charles Thibodeau 
Cindy Steiimmeller 
Darlene Mokrycki 
Walter Rivieccio 



William Babner 

Sherry Aheam 
Michele Auclair 
Laurel Bloom 
Nancy Brerman 
Jon Coutino 
Sarah Curley 
Jeimifer Dixon 
Brian Ford 



Contributors 



Editor in chief 

Focus 

Features 

Photos 

Photos 

Photos 

Entertainment 

Campus News/ 

Women's Issues 

Graphics 

Editorial 

Campus Life 

Copy 

Advertising 

Faculty Advisor 

Evan Foster 

Ada Kelly 

Robert Koenig 

TerriLadd 

Martha Love 

Melissa Phaneuf 

Erin Rose 

Jayme Wood 



Writing Center offers academic support 



To the Editor: 

Thanks to the MainSheet and staff writer Sarah Curley for 
the informational article on the Office of Academic Support 
Services (OASuS) and all it offers to foster students success 
here on campus. The article explained the peer tutorial 
program offered through the Academic Development Center 
(ADC) in South 1 1 1 and the math Lab in Science 1 12. 

One more arm of OASuS is also ready to support students 
in their quest for a quality education— the Computer Writing 
Center. The center is located in South 1 15, just down the hall 
firom the ADC and adjacent to South 1 14, the open computer 
lab. The Writing Center is open five days a week beginning 
at 8 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, 9:30 a.m. on 
Tuesday and Thursdays. Hours are posted on the door and 
sometimes change during the semester to accommodate 
various classes using the room. 

Fifteen computers are available for students to use at their 
convenience for composing poetry, writing up a lab report, 
shoring up basic skills, or polishing written text with the 
CorrectGrarrunar software. Christine Jacques manages the 
Writing center, offering help to students with quick ques- 
tions on their writing or a jammed printer. She can also set 
students up with the SkillsBank self-directed software to 



work at their own pace to develop stronger basic sldlls: 
forming coherent paragr^hs, using correct sentence struc- 
ture, expanding vocabulary, interpreting gn^hic informa- 
tion, or even clues on accessing consimier infonnation about 
warranties and much more. 

For longer consultations—beginning papers, getting 
unstuck when you don't imderstand the assigrmient, or even 
checking papers over when you're sure they must be perfect- 
-half-hour appointments are available with a tutor in the 
ADC.just down the hall. But, for any preparation of written 
materials by word processing with a helping hand nearby. 



Letters Policy: Letters must include the 
writer's name in order to be published. 
MainSheet reserves the right to edit to suit 
length and style requirements. We regret 
that we cannot accept poetry. 



make use of this arm of the academic support service 
available to every student at CCCC. 

Thanks again to the staff at the MainSheet for woridng so > 
hard to keep our college commxmity well informed about 
issues effecting our lives, both on and off campus. 

Sincerely, 

Dianne Gregory, Writing Coordinator OASuS 



Vote against new seat-belt legislation 



Typesetter sheds light 
on editorial controversy 

To the Editor; 

In light of Tom Redmond's recent editorial accusing 
Charles Thibodeau of insetting an inflammatory pull 
quote into his editorial about Native Americans, I feel 
compelled to clarify a couple of points. 

As a pagemaker for the MainSheet, I am the person 
who actually enlarged the pull quote in Mr. Redmond's 
article. I did not manufacture the quote; it was selected 
fi-om Mr. Redmond's text. Because Mr. Redmond ex- 
pressed the thought contained in the pull quote twice in his 
editorial, both at the beginning and end of the article, I 
assumed it was an appropriate quote and followed routine 
procedure, enlarging and highlighting the text. 

As far as the photo not available box, 1 must assure Mr. 
Redmond that I inserted this box at the last minute, just 
prior to the paper going to press, after the staff was unable 
to locate aphoto of Mr. Redmond. Mr. Thibodeau did not 
direct me in any of these matters. I must add that I did not 
willfidly attempt to discredit Mr. Redmond. I merely 
followed routine procedure. 

I am certainly willing to take responsibilify for my 
actions. 1 would like to emphasize however, that the 
highlighted text was written by Mr. Redmond himself, 
and he should certainly accept responsibility for his own 
opinion. 

Patrica Allen 



To the Editor 

I am writing in reference to abill that is currently pending 
before the Massachusetts Legislature. Said bill, if enacted, 
would create a new mandatory seat-belt law. Like many 
other students here on campus, I am strongly opposed to such 
a law for the reason that it infringes upon the personal liberty 
and fi-eedom of choice of each citizen of this Commonwealth 

In 1986, aCitizen Petition Drive collected tens of thou- 
sands of voters signatures and successfiilly brought about a 
referendum vote concerning a similar mandatory seat-belt 
law and it was subsequently repealed. That law had survived 
less than a year! 

Apparently, those who advocate anew mandatory seat- 
belt law just do not get it They are doing nothing less than 



expounding the same old tired arguments in support of it. To ' 
those who advocate the forcing of the new mandatory seat- 
belt law upon the rest of us, I have the following statements: 
"If it is a battle that you want, it is abattle that you have !" You 1 
are promised one hell of a political fight! 

Committed individuals, including myself, will launch i 
another Citizen Referendum Petition Drive at the Appropri- 
ate time. We will again collect the number of voter's 
signatures and again have the issue put before the voters. 
Without doubt, the Massachusetts electorate will again vote 
down the matter, and again have it repealed. 

Thank You 
Sincerely, 
Ron Beafy, Jr. 



President Kennedy deserves to rest in peace 



To the editor; 

After thirty years of unanswered questions everybody is 
still trying figure out what happened to our beloved John 
Fitzgerald Kennedy. Manyofyou^^4lo^eadthisarticlebythe 
end might be offended for one reason or another but just hear 
me out. JFK to many was a sign of hope, change, he was 
going to turn this country around. 

I have no quams about saying JFK was a good man but 
hasn't the american public seen this man die to many times, 
really how many times a year do we have to see this graphic 
death. The public is complaining about to much violence on 
television, well JFK's death has to be one of the most graphic 
scenes I personally have seen on the old boob tube, that's no 
makeup or trick photography you see every year that's the 
real thing. 

The American public has made a Dallas episode of a real 
mans death, who shot JFK. How about the children of the 
Kennedy clan what do you think it would be like watching 
yoiu- uncles or even worse your fathers death on TV every 
year around the holiday season ... is that any way to treat the 
American royal family? 

Now lets talk about family values, last time I checked 
cheating on your wife isn't a cool thing to do. Is that what 



American heroes are made of? 1 think Elvis and the Duke ' 
would be disgusted. 1 also think its safe to say that seeing; 
the death of her husband was probably a very traumatizing ' 
experience for Jackie. rmsureshehasacopyoftheshooting| 
just in case she wants to reminisce, lets stop rubbing it in the - 
families face. 

Let a man die with some dignity and lets make sure that t 
we stop supporting Hollywood's truly disgusting act oft 
making a couple of bucks off aman's death. 

Eric Volpe 

No history lesson, please 

To the Editor 

In his reply, Mr. Peters lamented over the current 
situation in Bosnia. All due respect, but we Jews, Poles, Irish, 
Armenians, etc. don't need any history lessons firom you 
about dispossesed people. 

Bosnia is aresult of people staying huddled in their 
narrow parochial views, clinging to obselete cultuie. Per-, 
haps there is a lesson here for you? 

Rustor Petrovic , 



Entertainment 



Mainsheet November 18, 1993 page 5 



CD Review: Pearl Jam at end Upward stern?"""^ 
of 'the road known as potential' 



by JACK HIGGINS 

Entertainment Editor 



by KEVIN MOULTON 

Features Editor 



What do you do when your first album sells more 
than seven million copies, receives critical acclaim, and 
becomes the new sound of a generation. Well, if you're Pearl 
Jam you follow it up with an even better and more astounding 
sophomore effort. Vs.. Fol- 
lowing the success of Ten, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
which has remained in the top 
50 of the Billboard charts for 
abnost two years and produced 
such tunes as" Black"," Ahve", 
and" Jeremy", the twys from 
Seattle seemed to just go for it 
without care on their second 
release. 

While Ten seemed to ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
drop the label of grunge rock- 
ers on the band, and link them with the likes of Nirvana, Vs. 
has defined them as pure rock and rollers in a fashion similar 
to that of a young Led Zeppelin. Right from the opening 
track "Go" the band seems to thrive on a raw, yet more 
refined energy than Ten. The iirst thing that comes to mind 
when most people refer to Pearl Jam, are images of lead 
singer Eddie Vedderandhisburstsofvocalrage. Onceagain 
Vedder has managed to chill the spine with his gut-wrench- 
ing vocals on such tracks as "Blood" and "Animal". You can 
almost feel the anger growing within him as he lets out a 



'You can almost feel the anger 
growing within him as he lets out 
a Morrisonesque scream of,"It's 
my blood."("Blood"), which he 
seems to hang on for an eternity. ' 



he seems to hang on for an eternity. However, Vedder also 
is able to mesmerize you with efforts such as "Indifference" 
in which his voice is one which haunts you with eeriness. 
What also must not go unrecognized is the development of 
Vedder as a lyricist. While he once again challenges such 
topics as sexual abuse("Daughter") and 
suicide("Rearviewmirror"), he also provides an ahnost po- 
etic beauty on tracks such as 
^^^^^^s^^^aa^^^ "Elderly woman behind a 
counter in a small town"; "1 
seem to recognize your face. 
Hatmting, familiar. I can't 
seem to place it. . . .thoughts and 
thoughts they fade away." 

As much as it seems 
Pearl Jam is far from a one 
man show. This is a band 
which revolves around and 
survives because ofits' rythym 



Morrisonesque scream of,"It's my blood."("Blood"), which 



section ofbassist JefFAment, and drummer Dave Abrueizzese 
who set the tone for almost every track. Guitarists Mike 
McCready and Stone Gossard, who both compliment each 
other's talents, provide the explosion which allow each song 
to reach its climax in a feverish pitch. 

One has to wonder if these guys can get much letter, 
and hope that they do not exhaust their vast talents liefore 
they have traveled to the end of the road known as potential. 
In the meantime Vs. has provided their fans with a fabulous 
meal to feast on, and will leave them craving more and more 
new material. 



Cd Review: Smashing Pumpicins 



by JAYME WOOD 

Staff Writer 



The latest release from Smashing Pumpkins, 
SIAMESE DREAM, is a winner from start to finish. The 
band display their prowess on the production side of the 
business with their newest offering. SIAMESE DREAM 
avoids repetition while keeping their trademark sound. 

The disc starts off with a real kicker, "Cherub Rock." 
"Today" and "Geek U.S.A.," are two more examples of the 
band's godlike ability to create fuzz tone masterpieces. 



"Quiet" also has single potential as a catchy rocker. 

The mood subtly changes and darkens with "Quiver." It is 
with this song that the Smashing Pumpkins show their ability 
to orchestrate. Unlike many other contemporary bands they 
go beyond ripping off the Beatles, and draw from other 
sources such as The Velvet Underground. 

The Smashing Pumpkins are a band that has developed 
musically and this album shows that growth. Instead of 
simply wallowing in their self pity, they explore other 
emotional ranges in their songs. This gives the disc an almost 
human depth. With the release of this disc. The Smashing 
Pumpkins have come of their own. 



HYANNIS CENTER * THEATER COMPANY 



Presents a stagea reading or 



A CHILD'S CHRISTMAS 
IN WALES 

4 



Fri, Dec 10 8 pm 
Sat, Dec 11 2 pm 

8 pm 
bun, Dec 12 2 pm 

4 pm 




AJuhs S5.00 

CUJren $3.00 



By Dylan Tnomas 



Tickets avaiUle at llu: HCrC Box Office: 790-1431 
also available at JFK MuseuWPimtan Clotliui^Cape Cod Gammmiity CoQe^ 



Hyannis Center Theater Company is locatea in 

RICHARDS GALLERIES 

tne comer of Main & Ocean Streets in Downtown Hyannis 




With all the trouble Howard Stem has had with the FCC 
in recent times, why the hell is he hosting his own pay per 
view show on New Years Eve? 

Well it seems as though Howard has become somewhat 
of a humanitarian. Part of his PPV show on New Years Eve 
will serve as a mini telethon to help raise money for John 
Bobbitt's organ-reattachment. Bobbit has incurred over 
$70,000 in medical bills since his wife removed his penis 
with a knife. 

But we all know that there will be plenty more time for 
Howard to do his shtick. He will probably plug his new book 
"Private Parts" a few hundred times, although it is already a 
best seller and in it's second printing. 

Then there 's always his cohort "Stuttering John" with his 
sfraight faced off the wall, crude, and imnerving questions, 
aimed at well known celebrities. 

His recent pjpblems with the FCC will probably steer him 
away from the "Kielbasa Queen," or "Homeless Howiewood 
Squares". You can be sure that Howard will always say what 
ot her people only have the guts to think. 

Blues World Loses 
Another Great 

Albert Collins dead at 61 

by JACK HIGGINS 

Entertainment Editor 



Texas blues guitar ace, Albert Collins, died on Novem- 
ber, 24th of Itmg cancer. He was 61. 

Often called the "Iceman" iKcause of the high pitched, 
icy tone that he coaxed out of his ever present Fender 
Telecaster, Albert Collins will be sorely missed. 

Collins was one of the funkiest, sharp toned, blues guitar 
players to ever grace a stage. This signature tone of his was 
brought out of his electric guitar with just his fingers. He 
never used a pick. 

Collins made his name in Blues by frising different 
sounds he heard growing up. He copped licks from the ghetto 
bars in Houston, jazz phrasing from the likes of Jimmy 
McGriff and Jimmy Smith, as well as raunchy urban-country 
blues taken from his cousin Lightn' Hopkins. 

His live shows were always something to catch. 1 saw him 
in the early 1980,s at the old Jonathan Swift's in Harvard 
Square. On this night he walked right through the audience, 
up the stairs and out the door and down to the comer at 
Mass. Ave and back. This was something he did often and in 
those days it took a roadie with a spool of guitar cable to 
accomplish this feat. 

Collins was one of the last bridging blues guitarists that 
linked the old blues masters, to the guitar players of today. 
Many of the great guitar players of today Eric Clapton, 
Carlos Santana, and Robert Cray, to name but a few, drew on 
his material to develop their own styles. 

The passing of Albert CoUins will leave a great void on 
the American blues scene, his presence will be greatly 
missed. 



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ReCIORDS 

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(BMBHH 



page 6 HainsheetDecember 9, 1993 



Campus Features 



How to ovoid a 
financial aid fiasco 



The Bargain of Community Colleges 



by BOB KOENIG 

Staff Writer 



by JON G. COUTINHO II 

Staff Writer 

When Ruth, a first semester student, left the CCCC finan- 
cial aid office, she had a hard time controlling her anxiety. 
After an hour of arguing and exasperation, she discovered 
that her current financial aid problems were her own doing. 
Not only had she misread the forms, but she also submitted 
them late. 

Many of the common mistakes made by applicants for 
financial aid can be easily avoided by simply following 
directions. According to Nancy Brennan, 

CCCC student and worker in the financial aid office, there 
are several things students can do to assure easy access to 
available funding. 

1. File for financial aid early. Forms are available to 
students in January. Students who have not filed early may 
not have their aid packages complete for the fall semester. 
Make sure the form is filled out correctly and mailed to the 
appropriate agency. ^ 

2. Your Student Aid Report is important. When you 
receive your Student Aid Report (S AR), bring all of the pages 
immediately to the Financial Aid Office, with the back of 
Part 1 signed and dated. 

3. Corrections. If the information on your SAR is 
incorrect, bring it to the Financial Aid Office for review. 
Some changes can be made at the office, and others may be 
made by mail. Unnecessary changes may delay the process- 
ing of your financial aid. 

4. Dependency status. You must be bom before January 
1, 1970, a graduate/professional student, married, have a 
dependent, or be an orphan or ward of the court to be 
considered an independent. 

5. Verification. To be sure the information on your SAR 
is correct, a Verification Worksheet must be complete, 
signed, and submitted, together with copies of your tax 
returns to the Financial Aid Office. If you are a dependent, 
your parent's taxes must also be submitted. 

6. Financial Aid Transcripts. By law, ifyou have attended 
another college of university, you must submit a financial aid 
transcript. This has nothing to do with your academic 
transcript and must be submitted whether you receive finan- 
cial aid or not. 

7. Financial Aid Do's and Don'ts: 
—Do apply before the priority deadline. 

-Don't wait 'til the month before school to get started. 

-Do ask as many questions as needed of the financial aid 

staff. 

—Don't complain about your financial aid status if you 

haven't done what's required. 

-Do register at the appropriate time. You can't receive aid 

if your not first registered and matriculated. 

-Don't base your expectations for financial aid on the 

previous year's award. Rules and requirements change 

often. 

Most importantly, remember, the Financial Aid Staff is 
here to assist you, but they cannot read your mind or do the 
leg work for you. They can't help you unless you first help 
yourself Make a point of knowing what is required of you 
and the financial aid process should go smoothly. 



Life Fitness Center 

Break Hours Starting Jan. 4th 
Monday-Friday 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. 



Finals Week 

8:00 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. 

Dec. 16, 17, 20, 21 and 22 

ATTENTION 

Locks and towels must be returned to the gym by finals 

week. 
Grades and transcripts will be withheld until equipment 
is returned. ' 



During these sagging economic times, 
many young Americans are preferring to enroll at 
low-cost two-year community colleges instead of 
expensive four-year universities. At the cost as 
high as $ 1 00,000 to earn a hachelors degree at many 

four-year schools, it makes 

sense that commimity college ~~~"^^^^^~^^^^^ 
enrollment is up 23 percent 
over the last five years, and 
more than half of first-year 
college students are now en- 
rolled at community colleges. 

A positive reputation _.^____^^_^^^_ 
is also increasingat America's 
1200 conunuiiity colleges. The facilities at most two-year 
schools are top-rate, and many businesses and academic 
think-tanks are now recruiting several of the graduates from 
these schools. Even President Clinton is impressed with the 
success some of these schools have had in worker training, 
and has suggested that his administration may give commu- 
nity colleges a larger role in federal job-training programs. 

The biggest reason many students are choosing 
two-year schools over foiu: is financial. According to an 
article in U.S. News & World Report, the average annual 



tuition at community colleges is $ 1,300, compared to $2,300 
annually at four-year public colleges or universities. A 
$1,000 savings a year is a bargain many students cannot 
avoid. 

CCCC student Brian Ford says, "I come to school 
here because it's much che^wr for me than other schools in 
the area." 

The annual tuition and fees here at CCCC is $ 1 ,920. 

The average annual rate at some four-year Massachusetts 

state colleges, such as Framingbam State, Fitchburg and 

North Adams is about $3,200. A CCCC student can save 

^^^^^^^^^=:^^^^^^^s^^^^=^^^=^= almost$l,300ontuitionayear 

'At CCCC I can get a good educa- JeaThert^^mp^efS fT^ 

tion at a good price. Besides my years at those other three col 

" *^ •' leges. Atotalsaviflgsof $2,600 

car won't mal^e it to Boston' on tuition to a student who 

makes this move. 

At CCCC I can get a 



good education at a good price. Besides my car won't make 
it to Boston," says student Nina Thomas. 

Transferring fi-om a two-year college to a four-year 
college has also become less complicated over the years. In 
an article by U.S News & World Report, data compiled by 
Arthur Cohen, professor of education at the University of 
California at Los Angeles, reveal that 84 percent of those 
who earn degrees at community colleges with the intention 
of transferring to a four-year school eventually make the 
transition. 



Are there no average students anymore? 



by ERIN ROSE 

Staff Writer 



What is the most difficult mark for college students to 
get? The correct answer is "C," according to arecent article 
in U.S. News and World Report. 

The vanishing lower marks are forcing college cam- 
puses to become elitist. There ^^^^^^^^^^^^__ 
is almost no such thing as the 
average student anymore, ac- 
cording to reporter John Leo. 

In order to avoid the 
hassles of handing out less de- 
sirable grades, teachers often 
just give higher grades, ac- 
cording to Martin Meyerson "'^^""™"^^ 
former president of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

As well as making the grading process less strenuous for 
professors, the students' excellent marks are supposedly a 
reflection of their own teaching success, Meyerson said. 

Most students enjoy the leisure of doing less wotk to get 
higher grades than normal, and the release of pressure fiom 
their parents and others. 

However, they will find it more difficult to compete in 
the job world because of these meaningless grades. The dean 
of admissions at a top law 
school said that his office ig- 
nores m^na cum laude and 
cum laude honors from 
Harvard because they are so 
common. In fact 83.6 percent 
of Harvard seniors graduated 
with honors, according to the 
report. 



'professors have lost faitli in tlie 
value of reason and hence lost 
faith in the value of their sta- 
tus.' 



faith in the value of their status. Their inability to give 
grades that reflect the standards of their profession is a sign 
of a serious loss of morale." 

A good argument can be made in the students favor. 

Maybe students are just trying harder and doing better 

overall. However, the College Board has been monitoring 

the college bound students in high schools since 1972, 

^^^__^,^^,,^,^^^_^^ according to the report. 



The survey of high school 
seniors taking SAT's reported 
that in 1972 28.4 percent of 
the students said they had A or 
B averages in school. By 1993 
seniors reporting gradesof A's 
^^^^^ and B's^most tripled, jump- 

ing up to 83 percent, according to Mr. Leo. Consequentiy, 
"this h^pened vMle SAT scores were felling fi:om a mean 
combined score of 93 7 to the current 902," the College Board 
reported. 

If students are given A's and B's for mediocre work, 
how can they be expected to succeed in the working world. 
Outside of school good marks or praise is rarely handed out 
to people doing average or below average work. 



One reason for the this 
explosion of over-achievers 
maybe the rising tuition costs, 
the report explains. Students 
and parents alike don't com- 
plain about the expenses if the 
students are receiving higher 
grades, Mr. Leo said. 

Another theory Mr. Leo 
reportedblamesfheSO's. Pro- 
fessors gave average students 
more generous marics to keep 
those students from the dan- 
gers of the draft, he said. 

Harvey Mansfield, a 
Harvard professor, said "pro- 
fessors have lost faith in the 
value of reason and hence 
lost 




The opportunity to 

complete your 

bachelor's degree 

" through the 

Lesley College 

off-campus program. 

•*■ Classes meet one weekend per month in Hyannis 
•*■ Unique transfer credit & life experience poUdes 
* Financial Aid if eligible 



Lesley College Graduate School 

is offering a bachelor's degree program in 

Human Development 

leading to provisional 
Elementaiy Education teacher certification 



Anticipated Start-up: Spring 1994 



For information and an 
application, please call 
Jane Kuniholm at 
(508) 362-2809 

Lesley College Graduate School 

(617) 349^10 or (800) 999-1959 Ext 8310 



ESLEV 



The Graduate School 



Mmce Meat 



Mainsheet December 9, 1993 page 7 



Kwanzaa: A celebration of African-American culture and values 



Sy SKYE CARLSON-GREENE 

pecial Writer 



As the calendar's page turns to December, thoughts of 
Christmas and Chanukah begin to dominate the season. In 
jities and commimities nation-wide there is another tradi- 
ion being celebrated, lived, and taught: that of Kwanzaa. 
Created between 1965 and 1966byDr. MaulanaRonKaranga, 
Director of Black Studies at California State University at 
Long Beach, Kwanzaa is rich with determination and posi- 
ive aflirmations. It is unique in being the only existing true 
\lro- American ( non-heroic) holiday. 

In the East African language of Kiswahili, Kwanzaa is 
aken from "MatundaYaKwanzaa"whichmeans"first fruits 



'On the last day, Zawadi (gifts) are 
exchanged. This exchange is different 
than the commercialism of other holi- 
days. The Zawadi exchanged can be 
good thoughts, services, handmade 
items or good deeds.' 



building and developing of our community in order to restore 
our people to traditional greatness. 

Kuumba( creativity): To do always as much as we can, in 
the way we can in order to leave our community more 
beautifiil and beneficial than we have inherited it. 

Imani (faith): To believe vwth all our hearts in our people, 
'our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness 
and victory of our struggle. (Maulana Karanga, 1965) 

Kwanzaa values black history and culture by emphasiz- 
ing commitment and social responsibility and by building 
knowledge and unity on economic, political and educational 
merits. This holiday can be observed by itself or in tandem 
withothertraditions. Kwanzaaalso values the future through 
our children and emphasizes their involvement by participa- 
tion in all activities. 

The symbols used for Kwanzaa are : Mkeke , the straw mat 
and traditional foundation, Kinara, the candle holder which 



represents our origins, Mshumaa Saba, the seven candles 
representing the seven principles: one black (people in 
unity), three red (the struggle) and three green (the future), 
Kibunzi, ears of com (the children), Zawadi, gifts of heart 
representing the fruits of labor and kikombe or unity cup. 

The largest part of the celebration, which takes place on 
December 3 1 st, is the Karamu or feast. Families and friends 
gather together to share in the discussion of Nguzo Saba, 
listen to African music, eat, drink and celebrate the collective 
efforts of all as well as plan for the future. 

On the last day, Zawadi (gifts) are exchanged, this 
exchange is different than the commercialism of other holi- 
days. The Zawadi exchanged can be good thoughts, services, 
handmade items or good deeds. 

Kwanzaa is a time for renewal and celebration of a 
culture, creative and proud, using tradition and reason as 
custom. 



Happy Holly-Daze! 12 tips for surviving the hoUday season 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Staff writer 



jif harvest". Harvest time in Africa was traditionally a time 
jbr the community to gather and celebrate the fruits of 
liollective labors and efforts. Thus the conceptual basis for 
jCwanzaa was bom. 

j Beginning on Dec 26th and ending on Jan 1st, each day 
line of seven principles of value, Nguzo Saba, are celebrated 
Border as follows: 

Umoja (unity) : To strive and maintain unity in the family, 
onununity, nation and race. 

Kujich^vlia (self-determination): to define ourselves, 
:reate for ourselves and speak for ourselves. Instead ofbeing 
lefined, named, created for, and spoken for by others. 

Ujamaa(co-operative economics): To build and maintain 
lur own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from 
bem together. 

Nia (purpose): To make as our collective vocation the 



It's that time of year ^ain folks! 

Do you feel you are doing the thorazine shuffle while 
waiting in mile long lines to pay for a purchase that took you 
over an llour to pick out? 

Do Christmas lights blink at you at every turn? 

While driving down the road do those mental lists of 
things to do, gifts to buy, cards to send, and food to prepare 
flash before your eyes? 

In every bank, grocery store, mall and restaurant all you 
hear is Christmas music? "It ' s lovely weather for a sleigh ride 
together with you..." 

Numerous commercials advertising Game Gear, Nintento, 
and baby dolls that wet their pants blare from your televisions 
sets. 

Alright! Enough already! Take some time out to relax. 



Here are some Holly-Daze ideas to put your hoUday season 
more at ease: 

1. Relax with a hot cup of decaffeinated coffee or tea. 

2. Call an old high school pal or a relative. 

3. Be creative and make some home made holiday cards. 

4. Put on some classical music and take a bubble bath by 
candle light. 

5. Take a brisk walk in the woods. 

6. Get a group of friends together and go caroling. 

7. Go out and play in the snow. (If there is snow!) 

8. Have a special candlelit diimer after a day of shopping. 

9. Go to bed early with your lover. 

10. If you have children, take some time to make some 
holiday cookies. 

11. Reflect on your own childhood memories of the 
holiday season. 

12. Take a ride at night and enjoy the holiday lights. 



\^egetarian Crepe Cake 



, >y SARAH PAINE CURLEY 

B ;taff Writer 



./2 potmd mushrooms, finely chopped 

i Tbsp. butter 

, large yellow onion, chopped 

./4 cup red wine 

•epper to taste 

.0 oz spinach 

. package of prepared crepes (or make your own!) 

i/4 lb feta cheese 




jJechamel Sauce 

li Tbsp. butter 

'.II medium sized onion, minced 

|l Tbsp. flour 

1 1/2 cups hot milk 

everal peppercorns 

jlash of thyme 

■! small bay leaf 



Tomato Pepper Sauce 

1 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil 

4 cloves garlic, minced 

1 28 oz can unsalted chopped 

tomatoes 

2/3 cup chopped pimento 

2 bay leaves 

2 to 3 Tbsp. red wine 



9 



lUte the onions and mushrooms in butter. Add some pepper and red wine, let simmer over 

ow heat untU all the moisture is absorbed and it is the consistency of thick mush. 

; Prepare Bechamel sauce. Saute the onion in the butter over medium heat. Add the flour 

Imd stir into a thick paste. Whisk in the hot milk and stir until thick. Add the seasonings. 

Prepare the Tomato Pepper Sauce. Saute the garlic in the olive oil. Add the tomatoes, 

'■ limentos, bay leaves and red wine. Cook over slow heat. 

' Steam the spinach. Squeeze out excess water. Chop cooked spinach and mix with the 
I Jechamel Sauce, reserving 1/2 cup. 

i Usingabuttered9"pie plate, beginassemblingthe cake. Start with one crepe. Spreadwith 
1/3 of mushroom mixture. Top with another crepe a spread with 1/3 spinach mixture. Top 
^th another crepe and spread with 1/4 tomato sauce and 1/4 of the crumbled feta cheese, 
fop with a crepe and start the whole process over again. 

I When the crepe cake has been assembled, top with some of the remaining tomato and 
ipechamel,sauces and the remaining feta cheese. Bake in a 350 degree oven until the top is 
!)ubbly. 
'! Garnish with chopped parsley and serve with the remaining sauces on the side. 



The Berkshires 

There's Something 

Special About Living 

and Learning Here 




North Adams State College 



North Adams State College, a premier liberal arts college, 
located in the beautiful Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts, offers 
many outstanding academic and cultural opportunities. We 
welcome transfer students from two-year colleges and erasure 
maximum transferability of your previous course wbrk into the 
major programs below. 

Major Programs 



Biology 

Sports Medicine 
Business Administration/Econ. 

Accounting 

Marketing 

Management 

Finance 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 

Computer Science 

Information Systems 
Education Certification 
English/Communications 

Journalism 

Broadcast Media 

Literature 

Public Relations 

Theatre Studies 

Writing 



Fine Arts (pending approval) 

Arts Management 

Music 

Theatre 
History 
Interdisciplinary Studies 

Pre-Law 
Mathematics 
Medical Technology 
Philosophy 
Psychology 
Sociology /Anthropology/ 

Social Work 

For more information conttut: 

Admissions Office 

North Adams State College 

North Adams, MA 01247 

800-292-6632 



page 8 Malnsheet December 9, 1993 



Campus Life 



Student Survey: 

If you could have just one gift for Christmas, what would it be? 





Bill Peterson 

Hotel/Rest. Management 
I'd like to see my family 
talking again, that would be a 
miracle. 



Janet Harte 

Hotel /Rest. Management 
That the world would be a 
place where children could be 
safe and secure. 



Tim Peters 

Fire Science 

To go to the Super Bowl! 



Polly Pelletier 

Medical Administration 
3 credits of Algebra. 



Pat Longee 

Hotel/Rest. Management 
Peace of mind. 



Student ProHle: 




Name: ErikVolpe 

Age: 21 

Hometown: Marshfield 

Course of Study: Mass Communications 

What do yon like best about CCCC? The cafeteria. 
Seriously, I think the food is pretty good. 

What do you like least about CCCC? It's too far from 
the beach, no skating around the campus, and people who 



sit out in the parking lot beeping the hom waiting 
to pick someone up. 

Wlio has been your most influential professor? 

BillBabner, he isaveiyinfltiential human being. 
He has raised my intellect to levels I never 
thought possible, plus he lends my girl&iend , 
who works for the MainSheet, lunch money. 

What books and movies would you 
recommend? JfeA/wiion is one of my favorite 
movies. It shows the real side of religion. Dear 
God, It's Me Margret is a great story about a 
young girl struggling to find herself and understand 
the fiuiny things happening to her. 

What's your pet peeve? People who are in the 
student profile that complain how the school is 
too easy, then fail out. 

How do you spend your free time? Surfing, 
reading, singing in the shower, playing hockey, 
rugby, basketball, and working. I have alot of 
fi'eetime. 

What message wonld you send to the President? 

Move out of the White House and into a project 
for a year, then you will truly see what America 
needs. But I think you are doing a good job. At 
least you are doing something, unlike the past 
two presidents. 




Seasons Greetings. 

by Dean Richard J. Sullivan 

Dean of Student Services 

At this special time of year, I 
reflect on how fortunate we are to 
have such fine human beings as 
members of our College family. I 
want to especially wish all of our 
students the h^piest and most joyous of the upcoming: 
holidays. Let us be thankful for all that we have and let us 
be sure to care and share in the spirit of this h^py and holy, 
season. 

It is my fervent hope that your dreams and aspirations will 1 
become realities. I also pray for peace, harmony and: 
understanding among all people. With the wannest regards. 

Cape Cod String Ensemble 

The Cape Cod Conservitory String En- 
semble will present two Christmas Con- 
certs. The first, December 13 at 7:30p.m. 
at Thirwood Place, 227 N.Main Street 
S.Yarmouth. The second will be held December 20 at 4:00 
p.m. at Mayflower Place, 579 Buck Island Road, Yarmouth.) 



«r 



Christmas break: A time to relax 



Christmas break is an important time for students. It is a 
time torelax (finally), to see family members, and to have 
guilt fi^ee fim. Some students look forward to not having any 
homework to do. Others want to spend time with their 
children or spouse. Still others can't wait to party with old 
Mends. 

Some students will be lucky enough to graduate at the end 



of this semester, and do not have to worry about flie stress of 
coming back to school on January 26. Others will be 
transfering to other colleges whether they are in this state or 
somewhere across country. Congratulations and good luck 
to all of you! 

The rest of the student population will be back in school on 
January 26, but until then, have fun, relax, and be careful. 
HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE MAINSHEET STAFFII 



Infinity 
Home Improvement 

Support CCCC students 

Landscaping + yardwork 
Roofing * Siding 
Painting * Remodeling 
All Carpentry 

20 years experience 
Faculty References 

call Rob at 760-2673 
Reasonable rates 



Ihe "Egg & I The Place For "After" 




521 Main Street 

Hyannis, MA 02601 

(508)771-1596 



• School 

• Dates 

• Homework 

• The Mall 

• Work 



• The Prom 

• The Beach 

• Movies 

• Hanging Out 



7 Days A Week • 11 p.m. At Night Til 1 1n The Atternoon 




UNPLANNED 
PREGNANCY 

Consider All Your Options.. 
We Support Your Choice. 

Counseling, Housing, and Medical 
Assistance Available. 

Call Carolyn Toll Free in Boston 

1-800-533-4346 . 

Confidentiality Respected 



Featftires 



f^f^ 



Mainsheet December 9, 1993 page 9 



The Caffeine Crave: A legal high 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Staff Writer 



"If I don't have coffee, I get a minor headache and I really 
start dragging. I really know it if I don't have a cup of coffee 
in the morning," said Sheila, an English major at CCCC. 

"I really feel like crap if I don't have at least two cups of 
coffee in the morning," said communications major Melissa. 
"After I shower and get dressed, I drink a couple cups of 
coffee and feel much better." 

If you consume one to three cups of coffee a day you may 
be addicted to apopular stimulate, caffeine. Test yourself to 
see if you may l)e addicted by not drinking coffee for a few 
days. If you develop headaches, become depressed, easily 
fatigued, or anxious, you may be a caffeine addict. 

Caffeine is not only foimd in coffee, but is also found in 
tea, soda, chocolate, and a wide variety of over-the-counter 
medications including cold remedies, muscle relaxers, pain 
relievers and stimulant pills, such as Vivarin and No-Doz. 

"I have two to three cups of coffee to start my day." said 
Joanne, a mother of two. " I get a headache without my 
coffee. I drink a lot of Coca Cola Classic too; that's loaded 
with caffeine." 

Caffeine fights drowsiness and muscle fatigue, can make 
you more energetic, improve concentration, and can brighten 
your mood. 

Gary Wenk, a psychology professor at University of 
Arizona, researched caffeine at Johns Hopkins University in 
Baltimore. According to Professor Wenk, caffeine is a 
general stimulant to the central nervous system, raising heart 
andblood pressure rates. Italso drains sodium &om the body. 
Dr. Wenk added that caffeme will positively affect only 



people who are mentally or physically fatigued. Those that 
are well rested will experience anxiousness. 

As with all drugs, there are some drawbacks. Too much 
caffeine can aggravate stomach ulcers. Large doses of caf- 
feine can cause anxiety and even panic attacks in some 
people. Woman who are pregnant should stop or limit their 
'caffeine intake. According to Dr. Wenk, caffeine can affect 
the fetus, overstimulating the heart rhythms. Caffeine is also 
passed on to the newborn through breast miUc, causing the 
baby to become jittery and have trouble sleeping. 

The Inn Keepers Club sells coffee and donuts in the 
morning Monday through Friday in the foyer of the south 
building. Bill, a member of the Inn Keepers Club said, "At 
the beginning of the semester, we sold about 500 cups of 
coffee per week. Now with the cooler weather, people want 
something hot to drink, and we are selling anywhere between 
750-800 cups of coffee per week. It's disgusting. I think I 
drink half of it too!" 

The Ski Club sells coffee in the afternoon, along with 
home bakedgoods,hotchocolate and tea. The money earned 
is used to fund ski trips. According to Dave Marhefka, a Ski 
Club member , the club does very well selling coffee to 
evening students and faculty. 

"We sell about 400 cups of coffee per week. We sell not 
to feed peoples addictions, but to give evening students and 
faculty ahigh quality of coffee and great home baked goods." 
Mr. Marhefka said. 

With finals right around the comer, many students will be 
putting their coffee pots on to boil, nibbling on chocolates 
or sipping soda, in hopes of staying awake to study. One 
student, when asked if he would be drinking coffee during 
studying replied, " You bet I am, because it works!" 



A few tips to 
avoid The flu 



byMICHELEQUEENAN 

Focus Editor 



MainSheet 



Everyone would like to get an "A" on their upcoming 
finals, but there is definitely one type of "A" to beware of and 
to avoid. It is the newest strain ofinfluenza, or the flu. This 
strain is being called A-Beijing, and it is arriving sooner than 
expected. How can you tell if what you're suffering 

from is the flu or a bad cold? First, take your temperature. It 
is the flu i f you are running a temperature of 1 1 - 1 02 degrees 
fahrenheit. Other symptoms of the flu include chills, head- 
ache, severe muscular aches, weakness, and extreme fatigue. 
The flu is a respiratory virus that is spread from person to 
person through the inhalation of infected droplets in the air. 
Those infected droplets escape into the air when the infected 
person coughs or sneezes. 

There are three types of flu viruses: A, B, and C. 
While B and C are more stable viruses, type A is the virus that 
is constantly changing. It is the chief culprit for widespread 
outbreaks of illness. New strains appear every couple of 
years and the result is an epidemic. The Center for Disease 
Control (CDC) in Atlanta, has predicted that the A-Beijing 
strain will be the most dominant flu this season. 

Being stricken with the flu can be serious, and some 
people do not realize how dangerous it can be. According to 
reports from the CDC, the flu and its related complications 
have been ranked as the sixth leading cause of death in the 
United States since 1979. The influenza virus massacres 
your respiratory tract's defenses. This allows secondary 
infections, like pneimionia or bronchitis, to develop. When 
the immune system has been weakened by the flu, the 
presence of pneumonia causes complications that can and 
have caused death. The elderly or people with weakened 
immune systems are most at risk. 



Display Advertising Classified Advertising 



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per column inch. One column inch is 1 3/4 inches across by one 
inch deep. Advertising agencies are billed at net rates and are 
non-commisionable. I^-paid insertions receive a 5% discount. 



Open Rate 


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National Agency Rate 


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Display Qassifieds 

A great way to focus your ads for lenters, employees, sales reps, 
and others. 

Di^lay ads one column wide can be placed as display 
classifieds on the classified ad page under the appropriate head- 
ing. Available headings are Employment, Volunteer, For Rent, 
Sublets, Services, Attention, Adoption, Personals, Paridng, Lost 
& Found, Travel, and For Sale. They must be placed by 5 p.m. 
two days piior to publicatioa 

Note that display classifieds are charged at rates different from 
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Oassified Rates 

All line classifieds are 25 cents per word per insertion. 
Lost and found line classifieds are free for one insertion, but only 
as space permits. The deadline for all line classifieds is 5 p.m. two 
days prior to publication. Available headings are are Employment, 
M>lunteer, For Rent, Sublets, Services, Attention, Adoption, Per- 
sonals, Paridng, Lost & Found, Travel, and For Sale. 

Layout 

• Page size 10-1/4x15-1/2 inches 

• Printing method is ofEset 

• Minimum space acceptable: One column by one inch 
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Column measurements: 



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To advertise in MainSheet or for more information, 

call Melissa in tiie MainSheet Office 

at (508) 362-2131 ext. 323 



There is no specific treatment for the 
flu, but there are things that you can do to 
help yourself feel better while your im- 
mune system fights off the bug. Stay 
home and stay in bed at least until your 
temperature returns to normal. You will 
get the rest your body needs to recover 
and you won't be in class infecting the 
rest of us. 

Drink plenty of fluids, especially 
when youhave afever, to avoid dehydra- 
tion. Fruit juices and broths contain 
nutrients that you will need to provide 
energy for your recovery. Avoid bever- 
ages with cait>onation because the bubbles 
may make your stomach more upset than 
it is already. Try to maintain as balanced 
a diet as you can. Every calorie is a 
contribution to that recovery effort. 

Take an analgesic such as aspi- 
rin, acetaminophen (Tylenol), or 
ibuprofen (Motrin IB), every four hours 
to reduce the muscle aches, fever, and 
headache. Remember, if you're imder 
21 , avoid taking aspirin. It could lead to 
the development of the life-threatening 
neurological illness, Reye's Syndrome. 

Antibiotics are no help prevent- 
ing or treating the flu because it is a virus 
not a bacteria. There is a flu shot avail- 
able that does help to prevent the devel- 
opment of the illness although, it is rec- 
ommended that this shot be administered 
before the end of October so that it can 
take affect before the true flu season is 
upon us. 

However, getting a shot is not a gtiaran- 
tee that you will not get the flu, but 
should you come down with it, it wUl 
mostlikelybeamildcase. Thisvaccine 
is not permanent. You must get a new 
shot each flu season. If you are allergic 
to eggs do not get a flu shot, that is what 
the vaccine is made up of 

If you missed out on getting a 
flu shot for this season, here is some 
advice for outsmarting the A-Beijing 
bug. Avoid crowdsandsneezingpeople, 
stay warm and dry, give up bad habits 
like smoking and alcohol, avoid becom- 
ing "run-down", and beware of those 
you kiss. 



page 10 Mainsheet December 9, 1993 



Body piercing, then and no'w 



by MELISSA PHANEUF 

Staff Writer 

A fad that started in the early 
1980s is still going strong, and 
in new directions in the 1990s. 
As long as can be remem- 
bered, women have had their 
ears pierced. It was something 
that went imnoticed. Until the 
new trend came along. 

Multiple pierced ears, pierced 
noses,bellybuttons,andmpples 
seem to be the way to go now. 

Remember the saying "Left 
is right, right is wrong?" Well 
that trend is being shimned time 
and time again. Men with more 
than one earring, or earrings in 
both ears is no big deal. It does 
not necessarily mean a man is 
homosexual anymore. 

More and more women have 
more than one earring ia both ears, and not necessarily the 
same number of earrings in each. Many women have 
earrings that run up the length of their ears. 

Both men and women now have earrings in their noses, 
although it seems to be more common in women. The two 
most popular nose rings are a small diamond, or a silver or 
gold hoop. 

Men and women also have their navel pierced, although 
again it seems to be more common in women. A hoop is 




Student Joe Bell and a few of tils earrings 



#M» ttTmlUM 



definitely the most popular, and probably the least painful . . . 
rumor has it that a navel ring is very painful. 

Who knows if the trend wiU progress fiirther, or even 
continue over the next few years, but as it looks today, 
earrings are a definite must. They are a way to express your 
own style and individuality. So go ahead, be creative, no one 
is going to look at you funny ... if they do, who cares? 



The butt stops here 



by JENNIFER DIXON 

Staff Writer 



Virginia Smith, once a veteran three pack a day smoker, 
now lives ahappy, healthy, and, smoke-free life and she owes 
it all to hypnotherapy. Hypnother^y helped her quit smok- 
ing and consequently she has become a hypnotherapist 
herself, and is eager tohelp people quit the habit. 

Ms. Smith, a certified hypnotherapist at Cape Cod Hypno- 
sis Center, conducts seminars to increase self confidence 
techniques, self-hypnosis, and establishing goals. 

Hypnother^y is used widely as a method of dealing with 
many problems, not only smoking. 

Hypnosis is rising in popularity and credibility 
because of its profotmd re- 




sults, and smoking just h^ 
pens to be on the top of the 
"things to quit" list. 

"It's as easy as A-B-C, 1- 
2-3," states Ms. Smith inher 
informative packet which 
she provides to smokers be- 



'With a lot of will power and a 
little hypnosis, anyone should be 
able to quit smoking.' 



fore beginning her session. She ftuther explains her A-B-C 
technique, which is simply counting to oneself silently . This 
technique will not only relax the mind, but will help one 
regain control in frustrating situations. 

This informative packet that smokers read over before 
beginning the session also may clear up any myths about 
hypnosis. Many people aren't even aware of what 
hypnotherapy is all about. 

Basically, hypnother^y helps the mind mentally 
accept an idea that one wishes to internalize. It is a form of 
relaxing the body so the subconscious mind becomes aware. 
Contrary to popular belief, hypnosis is a safe and effective 
method that has been proven to aid in quitting many bad 
habits. It eases the mind and helps the person visualize the 
task that they wish to overcome. During hypnosis, the 
subject goes in to a very relaxed state and concentrates on the 
habit to be eliminated. Hypnosis is known to help in many 
areas including weight loss, stress management, self confi- 
dence and most popularly, smoking. 

Music Review: The Breeders 



With a lot of will power and 
ahttle hypnosis, anyone should 
be able to quit smoking. Ms. 
Smith said it is not the hypno- 
sis alone that makes one quitj 
success depends on the person 
involved and weather he or she is ready to quit . Hypnosis will 
help the mind and will power accept the fact that the body can 
no longer smoke, but the addict himself must say "the butt 
stops here". 

Ms. Smith's helpful handouts are filled with smoking fects 
and statistics conducted by the American Cancer Society. 
The facts in the handouts are all true, yet people still ignore 
the bare facts. Maybe smokersjust forget the facts. The 
nicotine in cigarette smoke in- 
terferes with memory. 

Smoking kills more Ameri- 
cans each year than alcohol, 
cocaine, crack, heroin, homi- 
cide, suicide, car accidents, 
fires, and AIDS combined! 
Smokers lose at least 7 years 
The negative statistics are 



Adult re-entry program may 
be salvation for student 
trapped behind bars 



by BOB KOENIG 

Staff Writer ' 

I feel trapped sometimes when I realize I don't have; 
much money, or that I still have a long way to go before I eanr 
a degree, but I can't feel as trapped as my friend and formei 
CCCC student Brett must feel. 

Brett is in jail at the Barnstable County House ol 
Correction. Brett hopefiilly will be released in January, and 
if so he plans on returning to the college for the spring 
semester. Brett attended CCCC last spring and completed 
two coiuses, but when I talked to him recently over the phone 
he told me that "I never felt that I was a college student, 1 
didn't take school seriously." 

Brett has been in trouble all his life. Although he has 
many hobbies, none could replace his temptation to crime, 
Most of Brett's troubles occurred when he had been involved 
in substance abuse, alcohol being the common culprit. 

Brett's recent stumble back into jail was just another 
chapter of an old story. I asked Brett what happened this 
time? "I was stupid again, I got angry, I drank, and here I am 
paying the price that I deserve." Maybe Brett should stop 
feeling like he deserves punishment, then maybe he'll stop 
committing crimes. 

When Brett was attending CCCC last spring he consid- 
ered seeking counseling, but after being discouraged from 
friends, he told me he decided against it; an obvious mistake 
Brett's situation has been brought to the attention oJ 
Dot Burrill, Program Director of Adult Re-Entry, Women 
and Men in Transition. Ms. Burrill has done wonders in this 
program for other students who may have had problems 
similar to Brett's. Ms. ButriU says, "The main goal for this 
program is to provide support for returning adult students^ 
and to help them with their academics, while placing a heavy 
emphasis on career counseling." 

Homeless single parents have received high honors 
through this program. Brett has a home to go to when he is 
released and he has no children, so taking advantage of this 
program should be Brett's latest hobby. 

Brett will be released from jail soon and will be 
entering society once again. He'll have the support of his 
family, a few friends and the people here at the college; 
However, Brett has had many chances to redeem himselfj 
and through education and the Adult Re-Entry program this 
should be his best chance at redemption. But, if he decides 
to get angry and stupid again, he will have to get used to 
feeling trapped for a long time. 



of their potential life span. 

countless, but its the positive outcome that should be concen- 

frated on. 

Ms. Smith's also provides a tape at her seminar that 
includes helpful information on how to conduct self-hypno- 
sis. The t^)e is a positive encoun^ement to smokers, telling 
them to set positive goals for themselves. "All you have to 
do is sit down or lie down in a comfortable place and close 
your eyes. . . ." Ms. Smith assures the smoker that by embed- 
ding positive thoughts in the mind, one can and will over- 
come their task. 

Ms. Smith boasts the main thing one has to do is "think 
positive." 

Anyone who is interested in seeking help through hypnosis 
may contact Ms. Smith at Cape Cod Hypnosis Center (508) 
394-4139. Hopefully the results will enable more 

participants in next year's Great American Smoke Out Day 
to succeed in quitting. 



by JAYME WOOD 

Staff Writer 



The Breeders played an incredible show at Lupo's 
Heartbreak Hotel on Wednesday. The band was relaxed and 
jovial, and seemed to show little strain from being the 
supporting act on Nirvana's present tour. They are one of the 
few major bands that seems to generally enjoy playing live. 

They played extremely well despite their obvious 
intoxication. Kirn and KellyDeelspenttiie better part of the 



show staggering around the stage with Cheshire cat grins and 
cigarettes clamped in their teeth. At one point Kelly Deel 
exclaimed, "I'm sorry for being so drunk. My name is Kelly 
Deel, and I'm an alcoholic." The crowd responded with a 
cheer that let her know that everything was forgiven. 

They ran through their current hits such as, "Can- 
nonball" andrarities like "Saferi." They ended the show with 
a cover of "Dear Prudence" that did the original justice. , 

Everyone left the show with the feeling that they 
had witnessed something great, and they had. - 




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EMPORIUM 

Opening in M&y Carrying a full 
line of bead supplies 

Bring in this ad for a 10% | 
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features 



Mainsheet December 9, 1993 page 11 



Cloning of human embryos now a possibility 

Reproductions of humans could change the face of the world 



ty SARAH PAINE CURLEY 

;taff Writer 



Cloning. 

Just the word conjures up all kinds of mental images. 

How many people have jokingly said "I'd love to have 
, clone! Yeah. A clone to work while I play." 
The movie The Boys From Brazil might come to mind with 
filler look alikes running around. 

Or masses of people that not only look alike, but act alike 
nd have similar talents. 

Cloning humans is now in an infant stage. 

Animal embryos, such as sheep and cattle, have been 
loned for a number of years. In the "old" cloning process, 



'Just imagine, Our kids would be 
able to pick out what their kids 
would be like.' 



•searchers fused individual embryonic cells with unfertil- 
led eggs from vsUch the nuclei had been removed (Science, 
muary 29, 1988, p. 463). That helped to ensure that each 
ew embryo would have an intact zona pellucida, a clear, 
illy-like covering necessary for implantation and develop- 
lent, as well as enough nutrients to support the cell divi- 
lons. 

'■ This procedure was not practical for human embryo 
loning because of the unavailability of human eggs. 

In 199 1, Jerry Hall, director of the In Vitro Fertilization 
rVF) and Andrology Laboratory at George Washington 
[Diversity School of Medicine in Washington, D.C., and his 
Dlleague Sandra Lee proved that it was possible to coat 
;parated embryonic cells with a synthetic zona pellucida. 



(Science, October 29, 1993, p. 652). 

This opened the way for cloning human embryos. 

Recently, Robert Stillman, also of George Washington 
University, Hall, and their colleagues began with 17 human 
embryos that had been fertilized in the George Washington 
IVF clinic. The embryos were considered unfit for implan- 
tation because they had extra sets of chromosomes. 

First the team separated the individual cells, coated 
them with the artificial zona pellucida, and then placed them 
in nutrient solutions where they could begin dividing again. 
They got results: 

48 new embryos were developed from the original 17. 
Most of them did not develop to the point where they could 
be implanted in the uterus. 

None of them were implanted. Therefore, it is not 
known if they could have developed under natural condi- 
tions. 

The stage has been set. 

The debate is on. 

Questions have been raised and controversy surrounds 
the experiments. 

In fact, one of Hall's main reasons for performing the 
experiment was to stimulate an ethical discussion of whether 
human embryo cloning should be allowed to proceed. 

"It was clear that it was just a matter of time imtil 
someone was going to do it, and we decided it would be better 
for tis to do it in an open maimer and get the ethical discussion 
moving," said Hall. 

Daniel J. McCullough, CCCC ethics professor, won- 
ders about the friture ramifications of human cloning. 

"It raises the possibility that we could produce human 
beings forprofit. You could pick outwhat you want, just like 
picking out a cod at a frsh market." 

Amy Gold, a student at CCCC, was horrified by the 
prospects. 

"It gives me the creeps," she said. "Reproduction of the 
human race should be left to nature, not to science. Imagine, 



i^itamin Supplements: Who Needs Them? 



yMICHELEAUCLAIR 

faff Writer 



TotakeBornotto take B,thatis the question. Does 
le average person need vitamin supplements? The number 
f skeptics has seemed to be equal to the number of support- 
rs of vitamin supplements, but that may be changing. 

The benefits attributed to some vitamins are im- 
ressive. A 12-year study indicated that "the potassium in a 
ananaorglassofskim milk per day can cuttheriskof stroke- 
•lated deaths by almost half (Muscle and Fitness, Sept. 1 993)." 
otassium helps maintain the level of fluid in cells, which 
elps nerves and muscles fimction properly. 

Beta carotene, found in many fruits and vegetables, 
lay improve health. It helps the eyes and immune system, 
nd some studies indicate it may protect against some 
Ulcers, heart attacks and sfrokes. -.,? 

Vitamin B may help prevent heart disease, aleading 
luse of death in United States. B vitaminsmay prevent birth 
efects. • 

Furthermore, ingesting more of a vitamin rather 
lan high-blood pressure medication is considered desirable 
y proponents of supplements. They say that supplements do 
ot usually carry the risks and side effects of some medica- 
ons. 

A recent Newsweek article looked into the "Vita- 
tin Revolution" (June 7) and related "conversion" stories of 
nee anti-vitamin doctors. Dr. Stephen Deutsch is one new 
ehever. The head of a 40-doctor medical practice in 
California said, "I used to be very anti-vitamin. I didn't tell 
eople they couldn't take them, but I certainly didn't push 
lem." Now he does recommend some daily vitamins in 
ddition to a healthy diet and exercise. 

A Harvard epidemiologist (specialist in chronic 
iseases) studying the effects of supplements on health said. 
Until quite recently, it was taught that people in this country 
;et enough vitamins through their diet and that taking 
applements just creates expensive urine." Dr. Walter Willet 
aid that he now thinks he and colleagues have proof of the 
sllacy of that statement. 

liis shifting trend probably does not surprise Dr. Linus 
'auling. This winner of two Nobel Prizes (chemistry, 1954 
nd Peace, 1962) said in a May article of Muscle and Fitness 
nagazine that he became interested in the effects of vitamins 
tver 25 years ago. Hebelieyes that "the more vitamin C you 
ake, the better." He said, "Vitamins, in general, have such 
ow toxicity that for most of them, you can take up to 1 ,000 
imes the Recommended Daily Allowance 



without harming yourself" 

The authors of the Newsweek article said, "Recent 
studies have shown the benefits of high doses of some 
vitamins, but the official recommended daily allowance 
often lags far behind." 

An article in Current Health magazine (May 1993) 
suggested reasons why that may be a good thing. "Miracle 
Minerals and Vitamins?: Watch Out for False Claims" hsted 
nausea, headaches, blurred vision and birth defects as pos- 
sible results of large quantities of vitamin A. Excessive doses 
of vitamin D may result in a buildup of calcium, which could 
interfere with muscle functions, including the healt. 

^ Research has shovm excessive amounts of synthetic 
vitamin K may cause brain damage in children, and anemia 
in some adults (Newsweek, June 7). 

Most sources agree on one thing: aperson following 



if you had a kid and got divorced. If your husband wanted a 
child just like that one, you could sell the cloned embryo to 
him." 

Other students shared her sentiments. 

"It's an absolute atrocity and it should have never been 
done,"said Jeff Guinta. "Genetic engineering is atechnology 
that we need, but it is not ethical to go in and change things 
before they evolve. " 

Sheila Caldwell thinks it is really "weird." "Just 
imagine," she said, "Our kids would be able to pick out what 
their kids would be like." 

Richard Eckersley, a social analyst, wrote in the current 
issue of The Futurist magazine that the rapid growth in 

'Science has caused the crisis of 
meaning in theWestern culture by 
separating fact from value and 
destroying the 'magic' and 'en- 
chantment' that gave a spiritual 
texture to our lives. . . ' 



science and technology since World War n has been a factor 
in the cultural decay of the West. 

"Science has caused the crisis of meaning in the West- 
em cultiu'e by separating fact from value and destroying the 
'magic' and 'enchantment' that gave a spiritual texture to our 
lives. . . Science undermined our faith in 'God, King, and 
Country' by replacing it with faith in 'progress': the belief 

that the Ufe of each individual would always get better ," 

wrote Eckersley. 

How will the question "Where do babies come from?" 
be answered in the future? 



a well-balanced diet should not need supplements, and some 
people, such as children and pregnant women, do benefit 
from the additional vitamins and minerals. Nancy Brennan, 
a student, says she takes vitamin B6 as recommended by her 
doctorto alleviate symptoms ofpremenstrual syndrome. She 
says it doesn't seem to work. "I still feel like I want to kill 
people," she said. 

Luise Speakman, chairman of the Nursing Depart- 
ment, agreed that many people should not need supplements, 
but some do. "The consensus is that most people eating well- 
balanced meals do not need to take vitamin supplements. But 
the question is. . . how many people really have healthy eating 
habits?" 

If you are concerned about taking vitamins you may 
not need, or think you may need additional amounts of 
vitamins, talk to your doctor or speak to a nutritionist. 



Get Acquainted with us 

Before You Get Acquainted 

with Each Other 

Free Pregnancy Testing 

Gynecology 

Pregnancy Termination 

Birth Control 

A private practice devoted to reproductive medicine. 

Because with some matters it's privacy that counts. 

Reasonable Fees - Evening Hours - Visa & Mastercard 

iWomanCare 



Hyaimis Office 
62-68 Camp Street 
Hyaimis, MA 02601 

778-6700 



New Bedford OfBce 

12 Brigham Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

999-5757 



page 12 Halnsheet December 9, 1993 



Back Page 



'' ' < l -t?WVM'SS ! - ! J-W^^V'^^^ ! -^^ ! ^ ! -WW ! -!^j^!>' 



What's Happening 



Music and Arts: 



Hyannis Center Theatre Company located in Richard's 
Gallery at the comer of Ocean and Main St., Hyannis, 
presents A CHILD'S CHRISTMAS IN WALES Fri, 
Dec 10th at8 P.M., Sat, Dec 11th at2&8P.M..Sun, Dec 
12at2&4P.M. Adults $5, children $3. For reservations 
caU (508) 790-1431. Tickets also available at CCCC, 
JFK Museum and Puritan's. 

Brown Bag Events 

This year's theme: Molticulturalism Weds, at noon & 

Thurs. at 12:30 Tilden Arts Center lobby 

Seininars & Workshops: 

Awakening the Sacred Feminine 
6 week experimental class for women who want support 
in bringing forth the wild woman and honoring the 
goddess within. Fridays beginning Oct. 22nd,7:30-9:30 
p.m. Sliding scale fee. For info call Cunjan Laborde, 
563-7575 or JoEllen Rice, 362-8968 



MBTI TYPE Workshops, Fall '93 

Introductory Woikshops: Nov. 30th & Dec. 2nd 9:30 - 

11:00 a.m. in L102, 

Issues Workshops:(For participants wiio have taken 

MBTI) Dec 8th, 2-3 p.m. in LI 02 Type and Careers 

Dealing with stress workshop: 

weekly meetings Wed & Thurs. 3 : 1 5 to 4: 1 5 p .m . Upper 
Commons Classes are free and open to all students. 
Sponsored by the Adult Re-entry Center, 



Poetry Contests: 

The National Library of Poetry 

To enter send one original poem, andy subject or style to The 

National Library of Poetry, 11419 Cronridge Dr., P.O. Box 

704-ZI, Owings Mills, MD 21117. Entries must be post- 

markedbyDec31, 1993. A new contest opens Jan, 1, 1994, 

Intramural Sports & Activities: 

Bodyworks class 

Low impact aerobics, step, cardiovasciJar conditioning, 
gutbusters and toning, stretching and relaxation, nutrition 
info. Mon-Wed-Fri, 1 1 to 12pjn. in the gym. 

Basketball 

Tues. & Thurs. 1 1-4 

Volleyball 
Mon. & Fri. 2-4 

Indoor Soccer 
Wed. & Fri. 12-2 

Floor Hockey 
Mon. & Fri. 2-4 



Killington, "Vermont 
Dec 3-5. $119 includes 2 ni^ts lodging, lifts and ride. 
For more info on ski trips contact Diane Grondin, 
Financial Aid office, ext. 393 

Crew Club 

Join our school's most organized, conditioned, and elit« 
yet least heralded club. Contact Loretta Santangelo 
(team advisor) in the Life Fitness Center. 

Club Lacrosse 

New piactice schedule - Fall 

Fridays fi-om 2:30 to 4 :00 p.m. (bad weather - in tb« 

gym). Last practice will be Dec. 10th. 

Spring practice and games: M-W-F from 2:30 tO 4:3(1 

p.m. 

During February, Fridays only, in the gym. 

1st Game 

CCCC LAX vs Mount Ida College 

Wed., Apr. 27th at 3:30. Bus leaves at 1:30 pjn. 

For more info contact Dr. Sommers ext. 317 

Gay-Bi Lesbian Club 

Tues. 1-2 p.m. Upper Commons, C106 



AH sign-up sheets for intermural sports are posted in the Life Off Campus Activities: 
Fitness Center. 



Club News: 

The Ski Club invites you to ski Loon Mtn. Nov. 26, $20 for 
students, $25 for guests. Includes ride & lift. 



Winter Wonderland on Boston Common 

Nov. 26th - Dec. 26 

Santa Claus Theatre, North Pole Farm, Santa's Woik^ 

shop and Merry Land 



Kl 



Merry 




Christmas 



Free Pregnancy Testing 

Non-Judgemental 

Guidance 

Support Groups 




298 Main Street, Hyannis 
800-439-1172 

771. 



MK 




^PFP 



EARN YOUR 4YEAR COLLEGE 
DEGREE ON CAPE COD 

Finish your Associate Degree at 
Cape Cod Community College, 
then ..... 

..pursue undergraduate 
programs in Business, Liberal 
Studies or CriminalJustice. 
Continue working toward a 
Masters in Business Administrmion, 
a Masters in Public Administruiion, 
or a Master of Science in Criminal 
Justice Administration, 



Ulestern , 
new England 

College 



3169 Main Street 
Barnstable Village 
508-362-4936 




INSHEET 



February 24, 1994 



issue no. 



Volume XVIII 



Cape Cod Community College West Barnstable, MA 



Distributed FREE 



Creative Parking 101 



Pfioto br Tmni Lmdd 




Snow has shut down the campus several times this semester, causing major financial and parldng 
headaches for the college. The school has already expended this year's snow removal budget. 



Spring semester enrollment down 

uition costs, the economy, weather blamed forlO% decrease in admissions 



>y BRIAN FORD 

^o- Editor 

Admissions are down by an estimated 10 percent this 
emester, according to CCCC administration. In a report 
or the Fall 1993 semester, an official total of 4083 students 
ittended CCCC. Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs Ernest 
. Cole said that about 400 students have not returned for 
he Spring semester. 

Although an official total is not yet available for the 
Spring semester, the reasons for the drop in admissions are 
^ous. "It could be any number of factors," said Dean Cole. 
"Mtion costs and fees, the economy, the weather, it's re- 
dly too early to tell." 

One possible cause contributing to the decline in enroll- 
nent may be the elimination of the tuition cap, according 
o Nancy Brennan, a student from Dennis. "The tuition c^ 
illowed students taking a minimum of twelve credits to take 
tdditional classes without the additional cost." 

TViition was increased for the Fall 1993 semester, the 



tuition cap was eliminated, while the «^ on academic fees 
remained. Now a student taking more than twelve credits 
has an increase in tuition, but fees have remained the same. 

However, Registrar Martin Grace said the elimination 
of the caq)s is probably not a major factor. "It just means 
that students won't be taking as many classes." 

According to the October 5 enrollment report, admis- 
sions showed a slight increase in 1993 over enrollment in 
1992. Mr. Grace said that enrollment has steadily risen in 
the past four years. "We're at a high point now, but it's also 
not unusual for admissions to slightly drop off in the Spring 
semester." 

Bob Koenig, a communications major from Dennis, said 
that because a good percentage of these students have jobs 
and families to attend to, less important priorities such as 
school may take a back seat. 

Mr. Koenig also said that with a less than spectacular 
economy these days, people seem to be working more. This 
may also have something to do with the drop-off in admis- 
sions. 



Fisher 
offers math 
alternative 



by NANCY K. BRENNAN 

Op/Ed Editor 

Fisher College now offers a class that will allow stu- 
dents to circumvent CCCC's controversial math require- 
ment. "College Algebra," meets at Fisher's Hyannis cam- 
pus for two and a half hours, two nights a week, for eight 
weeks, according to the Fisher College Registrar's office. 

CCCC Registrar, Martin Grace said that the course 
will transfer to the college and will satisfy the college's 
graduation requirement for math. 

Currently at CCCC, students must score high enough 
on the math placement test in order to enter any three-credit 
college level math course. All students who do not test out 
of algebra must complete developmental courses as prereq- 
uisites to courses such as Statistics, Pre-calculus and Sur- 
vey of Math. Students need at least 3 credits of college 
level math to graduate. 

Close to 98 percent of the students who take the place- 
ment test are required to complete at least one, but as many 
as three developmental math courses, according to assess- 
ment coordinator, Clare Niven-Blowers. 

Mrs. Niven-Blowers broke down the 98 percent, ex- 
plaining that 34 percent of students must take DE051, Ba- 
sic Arithmetic; 34 percent must take DE060, Elementary 
Algebra; and 29 percent must take DE061, Intermediate 
Algebra. These figures translate into three or more semes- 
ters of math for students in order for them to be eligible for 
coUege-level math courses. 

Aside fiom the extra semesters of math students might 
need in order to meet the math requirement, cost is also a 
factor. Three semesters of developmental math cost approxi- 
mately $720, according to the Spring 1994 Fee Schedule. 
Add another $240 for the college level course. The cost of 
the Fisher course is about $390. 

Professor Gary Getchell of the Math Department 
warned that students may be shortchanged if they opt to 
take Fisher's course. Mr. Getchell explained that the pur- 
pose of algebra is not to "crunch numbers," but to develop 
skills which allow students to "set up the logical steps needed 
to come to a conclusion," and that the skills are necessary 
to "understand the forces which exist whether they be math- 
ematical, political or philosophical." 

Mr. Getchell also said that algebra creates a foimda- 
tion ■vMch is necessary to imderstand the higher level math 
courses which other colleges may require. 

Student Josie Gonsalves said she would consider tak- 
ing the Fisher course if it would allow her to graduate. She 
Continued on Back Page 



Nursing professor gets full time appointment 



ty BOB KOENIG 

Zompus Nev^s Editor 

CCCC welcomes a new member to its evening nursing 
faculty, Catherine Harris of Sandwich. Ms. Harris has pre- 
viously worked as a 
part-time faculty 
member, but will 
now be employed 
full-time. Her ^- 
pointment was ap- 
proved recently by 
the Trustees at 
CCCC. 

Ms. Harris re- 
placed Susan Miller 
who succeeded the 
late Paula Hibbett as 
a nursing professor. 




MursIng professor Catherine 

ItorrlS. Pl>«*o ky TwTl LmM 



Ms. Harris has provided clinical and classroom instruc- 
tion to CCCC students in the evening nursing program and 
in the LPN to RN transition course. 

According to Kath Kirk, Secretary for the Evening 
Nursiug Program, Ms. Harris is an excellent asset to the 
nursing program and has provided "time, care, concern and 
interest to all students w^io needed her over the past two 
years." 

Ms. Harris also has worked as a nursing educator and 
has served in the emergency room at Mass. Geiieral Hospi- 
tal in Boston. She earned a degree from Maiden Hospital 
School of Nursing, a BSN from Emmanuel College and a 
MSN from Anna Maiia College. 

Evening nursing students may well be excited about 
Ms. Harris' appointment because as Ms. Kirk says, "I can't 
tell you how many times students of Ms. Harris have come 
to me and told me how wonderful, understanding and car- 
ing she is as a teacher." 



Inside: 

Campus News pg.2 

CCCC student dies in drunk driving accident 



Pg.6 



Features pg.s 

Globe columnist featured at Brown Bag Lunch 

Entertainment 

Rock and Roll gets nasty 

Breaking ttie Boundaries 

Gwendolyn Brooks reviewed Pg. 7 

Back Page 

What's Happening 



Page 2 MainSheet February 24, 1994 



■:^mK'S!^im Campus Ncws 



student dies tragically in crash 



by Sheila Johnson 

Design Editor 

Ann Marie Leach of Buzzards Bay died tragically 
January 29 at 18 years of age. Ms. Leach attended CCCC 
last semester and took the spring semester off to work at a 
Boston investment firm. She was planning to attend a col- 
lege in New Hampshire next fall. Ms. Leach died instantly 
when the car she and driver Lee Andrade were traveling in 
crashed head on into a another vehicle. 

Mr. Andrade, 23, of Bourne lost control on the icy 
roads of the Cohasset Narrows Bridge , which borders Bourne 
and Wareham. The car slid into the lane of oncoming traf- 
fic and collided head-on with a truck. Mr. Andrade has 
been charged with Vehicular Homicide, Driving to Endan- 
ger, and Driving While Intoxicated. 

Ms. Leach left behind her parents and two older broth- ^ 
ers, and many others who cared for her deeply Her funeral 
and wake was attended by hundreds of friends and family 
who wished to say their last goodbye to Ann Marie Leach. 








Ann Marie Leach 



commentary 



Losing a friend is devastating 



by Brian Ford 

Co-Editor in Chief 

On Saturday, January 29, CCCC student Ann Marie Leach 
of Buzzards Bay tragically lost her life in an automobile 
accident in Bourne. She was 18. 

A 1993 graduate of Bourne High School and a student at 
CCCC last semester, Arm had just gotten a job at an invest- 
ment firm in Boston and was set to work through the sum- 
mer. In the fall, she planned to major in Liberal Arts at 
Magdalene College in New Hampshire. 

Growing up in a town where everybody knows everybody, 
Ann had a magnetic personality and was extremely popular 
among her iriends. Also a talented athlete, Ann lettered in 
field hockey, basketball, and Softball in her four years at 
Bourne High. Her loss was devastating to all -who knew her 
as she was close with so many people. 

The shock following the accident has left scores of people 
in sadness and disbelief. Knowing her myself, I remember 



Ann as someone who was always laughing and having a 
great time. Dealing with her loss has been tough on me, as 
it has been on all her other friends as well. 

"It's so strange," said her lifelong friend Bethany White, 
"I'm still expecting to pick up the phone sometime and hear 
her voice. I saw her every day." 

This is one of the hardest things I've ever had to write 
about. Not because I can't find the words, since I just can't 
say enough. It's because it brings out this feeling of perma- 
nence in losing a friend, and knowing that for the rest of my 
life, and to all v/ho knew Ann, that we'll never again see her 
beautifril smile or hear the h^^piness in her laugh, although 
it still stands out so vividly in our minds. 

I suppose we can take comfort in believing that she's now 
in a better place, and that someday we '11 see her again. But 
until then, we're left holding to our fondest memories of 
her uiiile dealing with the pain of her loss. That's the hard- 
est part. 

We love you, Ann. "Vbu will be missed. 



Campus security 

Be aware of those with devious intentions 



by BOB KOENIG 

Campus News Editor 

During fliese times when violent crime is naming ram- 
pant, every student and staff' member at CCCC should be 
aware of personal safety measures. 

CCCC is not necessarily a dangerous environment to at- 
tend school, but sadly enough, no place is safe from some- 
one with devious intentions. We all must take precaution- 
ary actions to prevent any kind of tragedy. 



riMrFf^FN^^Y NUMBERS 


On campus 


Ext. 333 


Off campus: 




Barnstable Police 


775-1212 


Rape Crisis Line 


790-1344 


Barnstable Fire Dept. 


362-3312 


NftN-EMFKf^^'NCY 


Security 


Ext. 349 


Counseling 


Ext. 318 


Health Services 


Ext. 331 


Dean of Administration 


Ext. 302 


Dean of Students 


Ext. 436 


Cape Cod Council on Alcoholism and 


Drug Dependence 


771-0132 



This, and most college campuses and parking areas are 
surrounded by woods, which can be a haven for someone 
with violence in mind. 

Day students and staff members obviously do not have to 
be as conceriied with potential dangers as those attending 
night school. The parking lots and walkways are lit up, but 
not enough for Fisher College student Karen Williamson, 
which is MAy she chose Fisher over CCCC. Karen works 
during the day and attends school at night and she says, "I'd 
prefer to go to CCCC, but their parking lot is too dark and 
too far from the school, and Uiat makes me nervous. I go to 
Fisher because I feel safer and to me that is more impor- 
tant." 

Other students might not be as nervous as Karen, but ac- 
cording to student, Nancy Brennan, "If one person feels 
uneasy about the dark parking lots, then that is one person 
too many, and everyone involved here at the school should 
be concerned." 

Clayton Leach, Chief of Police and Campus Security says 
that a security guard is on duty 24 hours a day seven days a 
week. Mr. Leach says, "The duty of our officers is to patrol 
the campus and parking areas, and securing of the prop- 
erty." 

Having one or two security guards on duty at a time may 
not be enough to accommodate someone like Karen. Mr. 
Leach suggests, "All evening students or personnel should 
walk to their cars in pairs or groups to prevent any potential 
dangers." 

Campus Security also offers an escort for those who 
feel uncomfortable walking out to the parking lot at night. 

Students should call ext. 333 to request the escort. 



Parking Notice: Effective January 31, 1994 

All designated handicapped parking areas on campus 
will be enforced with a fine of $25.00 for the first 
violation. For any subsequent violations the vehicle 
will be towed at the owner's expense. All parking 
tickets received on campus are forwarded to the Reg- 
istry of Motor Vehicles. 

Black History Month Celebration 

On Saturday, the 26 of February, at the Holiday Inn, 
which is located on Route 132inHyannis. The time is 
9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.. DJ John Lopes will host the 
event, and dress should be semi-formal. Ticket prices 
are $8 for students and $10 for the public. For more 
information call 362-2131, ext. 318. This event will be 
sponsored by The Ethnic Diversity Club. 

Bridgewater State on-sight admissions 

A representative from Bridgewater State College will 
be on campus to process applications and to accept 
qualified students on March 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 
p.m.. Unofficial fransfer credit evaluations will be 
done during an interview. To schedule an appointment 
or formore information, contact the Coimseling Center 
at ext 3 18. 

Whitehouse Advanced Placement Scholarships 

Advanced Placement exams will be given at CCCC. 
Students have a chance to earn free tuition, fees and 
credit. Testing runs from May 4 to May 20. Formore 
information contact Clare Nivens-Blowers in the As- 
sessment Center or call 362-2131 ext. 454. 

Janus Players present Cabaret 

Performances will be on March 25, 26, 3 1 and April 1 
and 2, in the Tilden Arts Center. Show times ate at 8 
p.m. all nights and a matinee will be offered March 27 
at 2 p.m.. Tickets are $8 for students and seniors, and 
$10forthepublic. Formore information call362-2131 
ext. 410 or 362-5554. 

Attention Poets 

' The National Library of Poetry has announced that 
$ 1 2,000 in prizes will be awarded this year to over 250 
poetsintheNorthAmericanOpenPoetryContest. The 
deadUne for the contest is March 3 1 . The contest is 
FREE. Every poem entered also has a chance to be 
published in a deluxe, hardbound anthology. To enter, 
send ONE original poem, any subject and any style, to 
The National Library of Poetry, at 11419 Cronridge 
Dr.,P.O.Box704-YD,OwingsMills,MD21ll7. The 
poem should be no more than 20 lines, and the poet's 
name and address should appear on the top of the page. 
Entries must be postmarked by March 31. A new 
contest opens again April 1 . 

Ski club spring plans 

The Ski Club has scheduled a day trip to Loon Moun- 
tain for Saturday, February 26. The bus leaves from 
CCCC at 5:30 a.m.. The cost will be $30 for students, 
faculty and staff. Guest are $35. A Killington trip is 
also in the works for Spring Break. For more info 
contact Diane Grondin at ext 393.. 



Correction 

The MainSheet reported in its last issue, in an ar- 
ticle on the number of students graduating, that transfer 
rates are not recorded and are unavailable. Registrar 
Martin Grace says that they are both recorded and avail- 
able. 

Further, the MainSheet reported that there were 
5000 students attending classes last year. Registrar Grace 
notes that only 4083 students were in credit courses. 



Editorial 



Jiebruary 24, 1994 MainSheet Page 3 



Missing *Muscleman* causes study room closing 



by DARLENE MOKRYCKI 
Copy Editor 

A Biology Depaitment "muscle man" turned up miss- 
ing recently, and other equipment suffered abuse, resulting 
in new restrictions for the Anatomy & Physiology and Biol- 
ogy study room located in the basement of the Science build- 
ing. 

The Biology study area, which one used to be able to 
enter from 7 a.m. to the closure of the building, is now "off 
limits" unless a teacher is present. 

Dr. George Kahler, when questione4 cited excessive 
noise, large numbers of students, irreplaceable equipment, 
and some items missing in action as the reasons for the se- 
vere restrictions put on the use of the room. 

When asked if the damage was due to "normal wear 
and tear," Dr. Kahler stated that the sheer numbers of stu- 
dents alone, and the scarcity of the resources, caused more 
than normal wear and tear to the equipment. 

My tuition alone as a full time student here, carrying 
19 credits, is in the neighborhood of $1600.00 per semester, 
without Lab fees. I wouldn't even venture a guess as to the 
collective dollar amount of the tuition of all the Biology and 
Anatomy students who use that room, both during the day 
and in the evening, but I would venture to say that it far 
surpasses the dollar figure for the cost of replacing the muscle 
man, or perish the thought, buying an extra one. 

For those students w4io are serious enough about their 
academics to strive for the A, to be there at 7 a.m., to study 
five days a week as I often did in that room, they resent 
being treated like criminals. What happened to the honor 
system? The collective harm done morale-wise to many 
disheartened students is immeasurable. To forbid study in 
these valuable rooms unless a "monitor" is present is a trav- 
esty—A travesty to all those students who do use this room 
at off-hours, who need that time for the extra hours of study 
necessary to learn all those bones, muscles, and systems in 



the short thirteen weeks of a semester. 

A&P II student LouAime Johnson said "It breaks my 
heart. I love this place. I'm always here." She said, "If the 
Science Department needs money, I have a checkbook. This 
is not about money, this is about principle." 

No one likes the fact that a learning tool has been 
stolen, or equipment abused, particularly the A&P students. 
But to take away the study privileges of all students who use 
the room when teachers aren't present is a grievous overre- 
action. Yes, it is a shame the muscleman is missing. Ybs, he 
did cost several hundred dollars. But these tbings do hap- 
pen, thievery is a fact of life, as is normal wear and tear. 
Most things have only a certain shelf life. 

The disarticulated skull, which I was told was price- 
less, and other items vMch are not replaceable need to be 
under lock and key But not everything. Slides, microscopes, 
and the like, should be available for study at all times when i 
the building is open. 

Some thought has q)parently been given to the library 
as a place for such study. The people from the library will 
confer with the Biology Department during its next depart- 
ment meeting, q>parently regarding the location of a room 
somewiiere in the library. 

Until something concrete has been put in place, we 
the students who care about our grades, v/bo care about our 
education, call for a rethinking of this new policy. For what 
CCCC and the Biology Department think they are saving, 
they are doing immeasiuable harm to their students, both 
academically and morale-wise. I say, bite the bullet. Re- 
place the miiscleman. Carry on business as usual. It is a 
business, after all, isn't it? The cost of doing business, 
whether we like it or not, is a fact of life. And, in an educa- 
tional institution, isn't replacement of tools part of the cost 
of doing business? I think so. 

Any suggestions for keeping a "Biology Dept." study 
room open to students wlule minimizing damage to and abuse 
of the equipment? 



What's the problem with math? 



MdlNSHEKT 



Editorial Staff 



Brian Ford 
Melissa Phaneuf 
Nancy Brennan 
Amy Paine Gold 
Jack Higgins 
Sheila Johnson 
Bob Koenig 
Terri Ladd 
Darlene Mokrycfci 
Bryan Russell 



Co-Editor in Chief 

Co-Editor in Chief 

Editorial 

OfficeManager/Features 

Entertainment 

Design 

Campus News 

Photos 

Copy 

Photos 



William Babner 



Faculty Advisor 



Contributors 



Edward Almedia 
Julie Biggs 
Sue Celli 
Earle Collins 
Mea Costa 
Robert Currier 
Carole Donahue 
Debroah Etsten 



Elizabeth Gouveia 
Joseph Gouveia 
Jana Jones 
Sybil Owens 
Lori Perry 
Michael Torre 
Richard Weathers 



Letters Policy: Letters must include the 
writer's name in order to be published. 
MainSheet reserves the right to edit to suit 
length and style requirements. We regret 
that we cannot accept poetry. 



The MainSheet is a member of 

NECNA 

(New England Collegiate 

Newspaper Association) 



by Nancy Brennan 

Opinion Editor 

The math requirement at CCCC has been controver- 
sial since its inception during the Spring of 1991. Students 
vAo have had to repeat developmental courses at $240 a 
pop often question the effectiveness of some math profes- 
sors. 

Is it fair to require students to spend the extra time 
and money learning algebra if some professors aren't will- 
ing to spend the extra time and effort teaching? 

I've Ustened to both sides of the argument and I agree 
with math professor Gary GetcheU, wiio makes a valid point 
in saying that algebra lays a solid foundation on vtliich we 
can all bmld in terms of logic. Mr. Getchell also reminds us 
that algebra is necessary for anyone who will be required to 
take higher level math courses, like pre-calculus. 

For example , Tom, a former CCCC student wiio gradu- 
ated by waiving the algebra requirement, must now take an 
algebra course at UMASS-Boston at twice the cost, or take 
a chance at pre-calculus without a sfrong foundation in al- 
gebra. 
On the other side of the argument is Trish, a former stu- 

Taking the hats off our heads 

To the Editor: 



dent who is presently attending Wellesley College. As a 
linguistics major, Trish was able to transfer her Survey of 
Math course, and had the option of taking science or math 
to fUlfUl her requirement at Wellesley. 

So the requirement exists, but not all of us are lucky 
enough to have Gary Getchell or any other professors who 
teach algebra using the idea of logic. As a result, many 
students are trapped crunching numbers, memorizing for- 
mulas, and sweating out a pass/fail grade. 

We need to look closely at the inability of some pro- 
fessors to teach developmental courses. How much time 
and money are we willing to waste until it is admitted that 
being a mathematician does not automatically mean a per- 
son is proficient in teaching? 

While the controversy persists, financial aid fimds are - 
decreasing. Pressure is on the government to cut the pro- 
grams which allow many students to attend college, and 
people are growing frustrated and disillusioned with the 
whole math ordeal. 

Is algebra usefiil to the avenge Joe? Maybe. But not 
in the way it's being taught in some of our classrooms. It's 
time that the requirement was as much on the professors as 
it is on the students. 



At the beginning of this semester, I was surprised \(iien 
an instructor announced a policy which rested merely on 
her personal opinion and disregarded a perfectly reasonable 
right for students to exercise freedom of choice with regards 
to their mode of dress. 

On the first day of LF-106, myself and the other stu- 
dents were informed by instructor Barbara Fitzpatrick, that 
there was to be no hat-wearing of any kind in her class, and 
she further expressed her disdain towards people who "wore 
baseball hats backwards." 

Clearly this is a matter of personal opinion and fur- 
thermore, hats are of little, if any, consequence to our edu- 
cational goals. 

My understanding of the college's official policy is 
that only modes of dress vMch are offensive, disruptive or 
disturbing to the educational process can be restricted. This 
is a reasonable rule. However, it does not give license for 



such blanket policies as the one I have described above. 

If is my opinion that Mrs. Fitzpatrick oversteps her 
authority by imposing such a rule, one wiiich is clearly not 
within the spirit or bounds of the college's policy on this 
issue. To prohibit a harmless expression of personal free- 
dom, is to trivialize our individuality. 

It is essential that we remain committed to restricting 
only those activities wiiich fall within the guidelines already 
established. A state college cannot aUow a policy wiich is 
inconsistent with the laws of the land. 

This is not merely an issue of hat wearing. In fact, I 
don't even own a hat. However, I strongly assert my right to 
wear one if I wish, providing that it is done in a manner 
which respects the rights of my fellow students. The U.S. 
Constitution and state and federal laws demand no less. 

Our present rules speak for themselves and we must 
either follow them, or define clearly what exceptions are to 
be allowed. Jonathan Mayo 



Trustee makes his debut 

To the Editor: 

I'm Mark Maxim, the new Student Trustee. I would 
like to welcome all fellow students back for another semes- 
ter. I also welcome new students who are beginning their 
college career. I will assure you that I will serve my brief 
term as your representative to the Board of Trustees to the 
best of my abilities and will always keep your overall inter- 
ests at the forefront of any decisions I make. 

I originally had planned on addressing the most criti- 
cal issue of this semester at this time. That issue is the pro- 
posed plan to expand this college by possibly buying a build- 
ing in downtown Hyannis referred to as the KAO building. 
The KAO building is only part of the plan, and work is on- 
going in putting together a plan that will please the state, 
the students, and the college family as aw*ole. 

Dean Augustin Dorado has agreed to meet with the stu- 
dents in an open forum. The forum will be held on two days 
and Dean Dorado will answer any questions concerning this 
matter. He also asks your input on what you, the student, 
feel about this matter. 

My feelings are that this proposal can give the college 
a great opportunity to obtain much needed growth. I am 
keeping abreast of this situation as best I can and will con- 
tinue to do so. 

I will assure you that I will support the aims of getting 
more technology and a better environment for all programs 
here at this college. Although, if this plan's cost is going to 
put an undue burden on us, I will vehemently oppose any 
action to proceed with this plan and would expect your sup- 
port to stop such action. 

We must pull together at this very critical time to get 
what is the best for the future of the students and the future 
of the coUege as a whole. I vsdll update you regularly on this 
matter in subsequent editions of this paper. Feel free to ap- 
proach me and let me know your own feelings on this so I 
can share that concern with the Board of Trustees. Thank 
%u. 

Mark Maxim 
Student Trustee 



Page 4 MainSheet February 24, 1994 



Campus Life 



photoa by Tmni Lmdd 



Student Survey: 

What is your best excuse (or a late paper? 




Amy Emerson 
Liberal arts 

"Someone stole all my books 
and p^)ers." 



Ian Philbrick 
Undeclared major 

"I was planning on dropping the 
class and just decided to take it 
^ain." 



Diane Higgins 
Liberal arts 

"I have a busy, screwed up per- 
sonal life." 



Nancy Walker 
Professor of Psychology 

"One student said to me, 'My 
journal is at the bottom of a 
lake.'" 



Scott Stevens 
English 

"A very close friend of mine 
died." 



Faculty Commentary: 

Ttie prejudiced are the ones with the problem 



by AGUSTINE DORADO 

Dean of Campus Planning 



Recently, I read an article by a Mexican-American 
student in San Antonio, Texas where she depicts the preju- 
dice she went through as a child. How some teachers hated 
her, called her dirty, stupid, and bug-infested, when she was 
none of those. How Anglo kids constantly reminded her of 
her background in a degrading manner. This caused me to 
reflect on my own past, and to see my present work and 
family life. 

When I see my children, I see three beautiful boys, 
Zachary, Jacob and Matthew. They are the result of a very 
rich gene pool consisting of Italian, German, and Swedish 
on their mother's side, and Mexican on their father's side. 
Their father's last name is Hispanic, and I wonder what sort 
of society they will grow up in. Will it be one that accepts 
their diversity, or one of prejudice that will discriminate 
their background. 

Although 1 have a very good job and a beautiM home, 
I grew up in the American Southwest, where I was sup- 
posed to know my place and not anticipate much personal 
achievement. The boss was Anglo, and the laborers were 
Mexican (regardless whether we were really Mexican na- 
tionals or ethnic Mexican-American). "Mexican" applied 
to all of us, and it was never meant as a compliment. I 
always imagined that if I were to write about my life expe- 
rience, I would entitle it, Mexican-Is Not a Dirty Word. 

School was not easy for me, but why should it be a 
surprise when I didn't attend a full year of school until the 
1 1th grade? We moved frequently, not as migrant laborers, 
but often due to my father needing to stay employed to sup- 
port a family that would grow to seven Uving children. My 
parents were not able to help me much in school work. My 
father could read and write EngUsh, and was very brigiht, 
but worked too hard and too late to be available for help. 



He died at 43 years of age. My mother learned 
English only recently. She is also very intelligent 
and hard-working, and now owns her own very suc- 
cessfiil restaurant. 

Our summers were not spent playing or at 
summer camp, we all worked in the cotton fields 
before we were teenagers. It was backbreaking 
work all day in the hot sun, walking up and down 
in the fields hoeing weeds. Is it any wonder we 
were dirty at the end of the day? And too embar- 
rassed to be seen in pubUc this way? It must have 
been from those impressions v/bae we picked up 
the names Anglos called us. It's really incredible 
that "lazy Mexicans" was one of them. Sixty hours 
a week in the cotton fields for a ten year old doesn't 
sound lazy. 

But, we heard the names, and I am sure I 
will never forget them. Some lack of self-esteem 
is my inheritance of those days. However, in spite 
of the poverty, my father kept us honorable and 
hardworking—that is our gift from him. Even 
though I did not realize it at the time, it might 
have been the greatest inheritance anyone could have. 

I learned to realize that it isn't money or family sta- 
tus that dictates what you become in life. I confirm that 
when I see my childhood classmates and their achievements 
compared to mine. And it certainly isn't my problem if 
some persons are too ignorant to see the struggles some 
classes of people have to live through to achieve equal op- 
portunity. It is their problem, and I can't let it bother me. 

I come from a family that could find joy, happiness 
and care in spite of the financial struggles. My challenge 
is to make sure I can provide that sort of loving, caring 
home environment for my children. Then they will be able 
to oven^elm any of the prejudice they may encounter. I 




AGUSTINE DORADO 



will have to teach them that the prejudiced are the oneS' 
with the problem, and they are the ones vibo should be em- 
barrassed. 

The young woman in the article I read came to a simi- 
lar conclusion. She will succeed in spite of her hateful child- ' 
hood experiences, because she came from a loving, caring : 
family. She learned not to let the problem of hatred bother i 
her, because those wlio are prejudiced are the ones suffer- 
ing. I think she and I would both agree that differences can 
be valuable, rather than something to discriminate. We can i 
learn from people who speak and look differently than us. 
After all, isn't that v(*at education is all about? 



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Features 




photo* by SbaHa Jttutmon 



'Fiisecl' unplugs art, 
science and industry 

Now on exhibit in the Higgins Ait Gallery is Fused: 
Art, Science and Industry. Fused is a group of regional 
artists ■vib.o employ scientific principals, methods and/or 
actual technology in the creation of their art. The artists' 
disciplines range from horticulture to sonar technology. 

The exhibit features moulded gourd sculptures, ho- 
logn^hic images, sonar-graphic installation, animated 
computer printers, mechanical sculptures, and much more. 

Artists exhibited include Daniel Ladd, Doug Ischar, 
Rachel Berwick, Betsy Connors, Arthur Ganson, Janet 
Zweig, Stephen Golding, Richard Rosenblum, Roy Staabj 
and Art students from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. 

On March .3rd., at 8 P.M. the gallery will feature a 
slide show presentation by Daniel Ladd. The exhibit ends 
March 12. 

Photos: Mechanical sculptures by Arthur Ganson. Above: 
Machine with Concrete. Below: Machine with Grease. 




Brown Bag Lunch: Chet Ray mo 
Globe columnist bridges art and science 




by SHEILA JOHNSON 

Design Editor 



At the first Spring 
Brown Bag Lunch, columnist 
and Professor Chet Raymo 
gave a lecture on his writings 
and theories about science, 
nature and the humanities. 

His column "Science 
Musings" s^pears in the Sci- 
ence and Health section of the 
Boston Globe every Monday. 

"I've been reading his 
column for years," said Mike, 
a science major. "Despite my 
keen interest in scientific 
matters, I just don't have the 
time to dig into the details. 
Raymo's column interprets 
complex details in a simple 
fashion which I can under- 
stand." 

During the Brown B^ 
Lunch, Mr. Raymo discussed 
art and literature more than 
science. He opened the pre- 
sentation with a reading of a 

poem by Howard Nemerov. The poem vras about a man 
who saw a glowing tree off in the distance and became over- 
whelmed by the miraculous tree. He took binoculars to get 
a better look at the golden halo around the tree, but what he 
discovered was a whole different concept. The glow turned 
out to be hundreds of insects mating- "a mystery in itself," 
said Mr. Raymo. 

"We are blinded by the mundane. We have to look to 
the artist and poet as seers, to show us how to see and expe- 





February 24, 1994 MainSheec Page 5 

Buckle up 
it's the law! 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Features Editor 

As of February 1, there will be a mandatory law for 
motorists and their passengers to buckle down and wear 
their seat belts. 

The seat belt law was passed by the legislature on 
January 4, over turning Republican Governor WUliam F. 
Weld's veto. 

The penalty for breaking the law is a $25 fine for 
drivers and passengers not wearing their seat belts. How- 
ever, police officers can enforce this law only if the vehicle 
in which the people are traveling is stopped for another vio- 
lation. 

Over a period often years, 4S states have made wear- 
ing seat belts mandatory. The percentage jumped from 1 1 
in 1982 to 62 in 1993, nation wide. 

At present, Massachusetts seat belt wearers rate about 
30 percent. Auto insurance premiums would be cut by 5 
percent if the percentage of seat belt wearers rose to 50 
percent. If a person does get stopped and is not wearing a 
seat belt, there will be no increase in insurance rates. 

In 1986, Massachusetts had a mandatory seat belt law 
that only lasted 11 months before the voting citizens re- 
pealed it. Already a movement has begun to put the law on 
the November 1994 ballot. 

Already at work is the "Conunittee to Repeal the 
Mandatory Seat Belt Law." Ed Doukszewicz of West 
Hyannisport and Barry Brown ofYarmouth were out at shop- 
ping madls collecting signatures for a November referen- 
dum. 35,000 signatures will be needed in order to have a 
repeal on the ballot. Douksewicz feels that seat belts save 
lives, but it should not be made mandatory, and that people 
should have freedom of choice. 

"I don't think it should be mandatory. If you have 
common sense, you will buckle up anyway. It should be a 
matter of choice. I have a relative and if he was wearing a 
seat belt he would have been killed," said Fran Bates of Ply- 
mouth. "However, I have another friend wio's life was saved 
because he was wearing his seat belt." 

Danny, a student studying in the Emergency Medical 
Techiucian field said, "It shouldn't be required to wear a 
seat belt. The state is trying to make a lot of money out of 
this." 

"The law should not exist because of individual rights. 
People should be allowed to choose whether or not to wear 
seat belts," said Ten, a student of Early Childhood educa- 
tion. "But I feel that it should be required for children to 
wear them, perhaps they should set an age limit-until they're 
old enough to know better, and to know the consequences." 

Sean, majoring in psychology stated, "It should not be 
mandatory. Only good can come from wearing a seat belt. 
Lives have been saved from belts, but not because of man- 
datory laws." 

Diane, a fme arts major, felt that the mandatory seat 
belt law was good. "I think the mandatory law is great be- 
cause belts save Uves. I never wore a seat belt until it be- 
came mandatory. I wore it occasionally, like on the highway 
and long trips, but not just going down tcwn to get milk." 

Missi, studying communications supported the law. "I 
think it is a very good thing because it saves lives. I've 
always worn my seat belt, so it is no big deal for me." 
"My strongest belief is that there are too many mandatory 
laws. There are to many people out there telling us what we 
can, and can not do," said Ms. Bates. 



Chet Raymo describes enthusiastically tlie mysteries of tite molecule. 



rience the world in that way. That commonplace is miracu- 
lous," he said. 

Mr. Raymo also said that -wtile art finds mystery, sci- 
ence t^es themystery away from the world. "Science solves 
one mystery and creates another; at every level we encoun- 
ter another mystery," said Mr. Raymo. 

During the Brovm Bag, Mr. Raymo encouraged ques- 
tions and discussion about art and his writing for the Globe. 
One student mentioned that he found it amazing that Mr. 



Raymo could "come up" with a weekly topic for the Globe. 
Mr. Raymo replied "Piece of cake. %u can write about 
anything." 

Aside from writing his column and teaching Physics 
at Stonehill College, Mr. Raymo has authored and illus- 
trated eight books. His work a has been anthologized in the 
Norton Book of Nature and his second novel The Dork of 
Cork, is bemg translated into nine languages. It will also 
be made into a movie next summer by the producer and 
director responsible for The Field, My left Foot, Brideshead 
Revisited, and Object of Beauty. 

According to Higgins Art Gallery curator Anne Wil- 
son Lloyd, "Mr. Raymo is an avrard winning professor and 
is known for his mspiring," literate and interdisciplinary w^ 
proach to science writing. We are honored he accepted the 
gallery's invitation to speak." 



smumusatmrnssimmBBaa^asmt 



Page 6 MainSheet February 24, 1994 




Entertainment 



Give me a break 

'In my opinion entrails are not entertainment' 



by JACK HIGGINS 

Entertainment Editor 



Recently I received a t^)e to review for the entertain- 
ment page of our college newspaper Being very eager as 
most music excites me to at least a certain degree, I imme- 
diately opened the package. 



Paul Rodgers & Company 
CD Review: The HENDRIX Set 

by JACK HIGGINS 

Entertainment Editor 

Paul Rodgers once again puts together a top shelf band, 
and releases yet another musical tribute. The HENDRIX 
Set, culled from a live show in Miami, at Bayfront Park, on 
July 4th, 1993. 

The HENDRIX Set is only a five song E.R disc, but the 
songs shine, and even Jimi would have been proud of the 
arrangements. 

Paul Rodgers & Company includes Paul Rodgers (ex. Free, 
Bad Co., The Firm, The Law) on vocals, Neal Schon (ex 
Santana, Journey, Bad English) on guitar, and the rhythm 
section includes Todd Jensen on bass, and Deen Castronovo 
on drums. 

On the first two cuts, "Purple Haze" and "Stone Free," the 
music is note for note Hendrix, but a little fatter tone than 
the original. The vocals, on the other hand, are fidler and 
I more alive than Jimi's versions. 

The third track "Little Wing," \»*ich is probably one of 
the most covered Hendrix tunes, shows a slightly different 
arrangement than the original. And in my opinion, equals 
or surpasses Jimi's arrangement. Eric Clapton and Stevie 
Ray Vaughn both have done great versions of "Little Wing," 
but Paul Rodgers & Co. take the song to another level. 

The next cut, "Manic Depression," is Hendrix to the tee. 
The band doesn't stray from the original, but the vocals do 
stand out more. 

"Foxy Lady", the last track on the disc, is also deeper and 
fatter toned than the Hendrix version. On this track, the 
band as a unit kick on all cylinders. The rhythm section 
really stands out, laying an incredible foundation for Schon 
to solo over 

As a whole this disc is a remaikable tribute to Jimi Hendrix. 
The vocals are stronger and more soulful, and the guitar 
work is on par with Jimi's. The foundation the rhythm sec- 
tion lays down throughout is exceptional. Probably better 
than Jimi's own rhythm sections in both the Experience and 
the Band of Gypsies. 

It must have been a wonderful afternoon in Miami last 4th 
of July, and I imagine Jimi was smiling too. 



'I have never been one to believe 
in censorship of the arts, but to 
me this is not art ... it is criminal.* 



I have been accused 
of being a bit biased musi- 
cally, but now I must state 
"I am musically preju- 
diced." This prejudice 
within me reared it's ugly 
head after just glimpsing 
the cover of CANNIBAL ^^^^■^^^^^^~~ 
CORPSE'S, Tomb of the Mutilated. 

Gr^hically pictured on the cover is a disemboweled 
female with a vile looking zombified man with his face in 
her wound. This is not entertainment, this is disgusting, 
sick, and degrading to even those of us witti very open minds. 

With a little bit of research, I found out that this style 
of music is called "Death Metal," some kind of bastard son 
of heavy metal. "Give Me A Break," kill the bastard. 

I have never been one to believe in censorship of the 



arts, but to me this is not ait ... it is criminal. The song titles 
alone are enough to raise the hair on the back of your neck. 
Some of the songs (growls) on the tape are "Hammer 
Smashed Face," "Split Wide Opea" "Necropedophile," "The 
Cryptic Stench," and "Beyond The Cemetery." These are 
just the songs that are printable in this newspaper. 

Reading the enclosed lyric sheet which accompanied 

the tape brought sheer horror 

to my entire heart and soul. 
The things that this group of 
deranged morticians (there is 
no way humanly possible to 
call them a band) chose as sub- 
ject matter both disgusted and 
^^^^^^^^■^^^■~~ appalled me, and let's not for- 
get the horror and the gore. 

What concerns me more than my opinion of this gar- 
bage is the legions of young people wiio are a bit lost during 
adolescence. They just might stumble into this and feel its 
cool, just to try to belcHig to something. To me this is very 
frightening. Almost as frightening as the fact I must give 
these "ghouls" some publicity in hopes of making the pub- 
lic aware of this garbage. 

"GIVE ME A BREAK," kill the bastard. 




photo hy Biyan HumoII 

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Ladies and Gentlemen, there's a 

new law in town and it's called 

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The MainSheet has decided to give me 
my own columji, a shot at answering 

any and all of your questions about 
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-M. Fuller 



A literary view of 
Zora Neale Hurston 



As I read "How it Feels to be Colored Me," the story 
appeared visually to me~I pictured a young black girl with 
a blue checkered dress, dirt smeared all over her from mud 
pies, and the paint from her artvrork, smiling happy faces in 
i)lue, yellow, black, and red, spread across a white page. 
She makes her journey from a little girl who danced for 
dimes to a woman who dances only for herself. The little 
girl grows up happy, free from sorrow, free from racism, 
free from the "white man." 

Moving toward womanhood, she ventures across the 
Mississippi River and into the real world, leaving on the 
shore her childhood. I was afraid for this little girl. I ex- 
pected her to be faced with pain, tears and shame—the re- 
sentment towards the color of her skin. I could feel the 
"heaviness" of her journey. I expected her to no longer 
smile. But instead, she proved to me that the "white man" 
wouldn't get to her That she would still dance, not for 
dimes but for herself She believed in herself 

Water, in the story, is not the peace and solitude as 
depicted in other works like Adrienne Rich's "Diving into 
the Wreck." Instea4 the water represents how she must 
face a new life. She takes a riverboat to Jacksonville and, 
"It seemed I had suffered a seachange." While the change 
is painfril, it is needed to make her a complete black woman- 
-one who knows pain, prejudice, and also happiness. The 
trip across the river is an epiphany for the girl, becoming a 
woman, causing her to open eyes and mind alike. 

"When covered by the waters, I am; and the ebb but 
reveals me again." She is nothing when covered by water, 
to people she is nothing special. Just black. She doesn't 
think and she doesn't feel. But wiien the water leaves, it 
leveals the woman. She stands out like a "black rock," a 
teeak in the even flow of the water. The water has moved, 
but nothing has changed. "I remain myself." And nothing 
will modify her true nature. She will be y/hat she wants to 
be, not colored. "I have no race, I am me." 

"Me" is anything she wishes to be. She can stroll 
down New Yoik streets with her nose in the air, or feel mu- 
sic as "blobs of purple and red emotion" flowing through 
her. She allows herself to feel and be, "The cosmic Zora." 



^Breaking the Boundaries* replaces women* s page 



by SHEILA JOHNSON and NANCY BRENNAN 

Welcome to "Breaking the Boundaries!" We took 
over the former Women's page at the start of this semester, 
with the hopes of making it more gender friendly. We 
would like to devote this page to a celebration of women 
so that everyone may have a chance to get more in touch 
with their "feminine sides." We plan to introduce the posi- 
tive world of women without bashing, whining or 
d iscriminating. 

Throughout the semester, "Breaking the Bound- 
aries" will focus on different political, social, intellectual, 
and cultural themes. In this issue, we have devoted the 
page to African- American women in celebration of Black 
History Month. With March being Women's History 
Month, we will center on the evolution of women's rights 
through the centuries. 



While developing the new theme for the page, we 
sought the advice of Professor Louise Deutsch. Louise 
reinforced our committment to making the page a posi- 
tive endeavor, and offered herself as advisor, contact, ref- 
erence guide, and friend. 

With the help of Louise and her former "Survey of 
Women's Literature" students, we will introduce our au- 
dience to student criticisms of literature. Our desire is to 
let both men and women have a taste of women's htera- 
ture, which has been much overlooked by scholars and 
school children, alike. 

Anyone is welcome, male or female, young or old, 
liberal or conservative, to take part in breaking the bound- 
aries of gender. Contributions, written or otherwise, 
should be forwarded to the MainSheet via Nancy or Sheila. 
We hope all enjoy our efforts in celebrating the woman. 



A Literary View of Gwendolyn Brooks 



by Sheila Johnson 

"The Mother" is a poem about the regret a woman 
faces after having an abortion. She remembers the lives 
that were once alive inside her, she is asking for their for- 
giveness and is suggesting that her loss is equal to the loss 
the unborn children have suffered. 

The woman becomes tormented by the guilt and sor- 
row so heavy. "I stole your births your names, 'Vbur straight 
baby tears and your games." In accepting that the responsi- 
bility for the abortions is hers, the woman says, "Whine that 
the crime was other than mine." She has caused herself 
pain, and is trying to punish herself with the memories of 
what could have been and mourns her "dim dears at the 
breast they never sucked." 

"You wiU. never neglect or beat them, or silence or 
buy with a sweet," and so she rationalizes her actions by 
acknowledging that she will never have the opportunity to 
abuse the children. She also accepts that she will never be 
able to enjoy the wonders that her children could have 
brought. To teach them right from vwrong. To feel the pres- 
ence of a child. To hear the child breath, laugh and cry 

"I have eased," says the mother wlio has reserved her 
fate. She has eased her way into a life dissatisfying, and 
feels she will face a life of eternal hell for w^iat she has done 
to herself and to her children. 



Both "The Mother" and abortion are about choices. 
Sometimes human beings do not make the best choices. This 
woman made a choice in which she originally thought only 
of herself, and she felt she had given up the opportunity to 
care for and love her children. 

Gwendolyn Brooks wiiispers in a voice the feelings of 
the mother, her choice, her babies, and her body Her poem 
makes one stop to consider both sides of abortion. The child, 
and the mother. 



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Pages MainSheet February 24,1994 



R 



Intermediate Algebra success 
rates below national average 

by Nancy K. Brennan 

A 1 992 study concluded that student completion rates, 
or success rates, in Intermediate Algebra fell below the 
national average, according to Clare Niven-Blowers, As- 
sessment Coordinator at CCCC. 

The study was based on new students who were placed 
into one of three developmental math courses as a re- 
sult of their assessment test scores. The Basic Arith- 
metic and Elementary Algebra success rates, 62.6 per- 
cent and 54. 1 percent, respectively, were in line with the 
national average of 51 to 54 percent. 

The Intermediate Algebra completion rate, however, 
checked in at 17 to 20 percent below the national aver- 
age with 33.6 percent success. 

According to Mrs. Niven-Blowers, 98 percent of all 
students who take the placement test must complete at 
least one, but as many as three developmental math 
courses before they become eligible to take a college- 
level math course, such as Statistics or Pre-Calculus. 

All students who wish to become matriculated (ac- 
cepted into a specific program of study) must take the 
placement test which assesses one's ability in English 
and arithmetic. Students must be matriculated in order 
to receive financial aid. 



Math at Fistier 

Continued from page one 

explained that in her current situation, "I was just going to 
transfer, and I'm not going to graduate [from CCCC] be- 
cause I don't have the math." 
■■~"~~~~"^"^"^^ Another student, Nina Boettcher, 
agreed. "The majority [of stu- 
dents] woidd probably go for the 
course to fulfill the math require- 
ment." 

However, not all CCCC students 
think that Fisher's course is a bar- 
gain. Jonathan Flynn said the 
course, "Won't do what it's sup- 
posed to do. You can't learn v/bat 
other colleges want you to know 
in seven weeks." 
Mark Van Savage said he took a 
^^^,^^_______ math course at CCCC for three 

hours a night, once a week and 
that, "After an hour and a half, I wanted to kill somebody. 
Math in small doses is enough." He stated that three hours, 
twice a week was too much. 

The math issue has been the focus of attention since 
the introduction of the math requirement in Spring 1991. 
Sources in axiministration say, "If we solved the math prob- 
lem, our graduation rate would jump. It's a major obstacle 
to graduation." 



"Mr. Getchell 
explained that 
the purpose of 
algebra is not 

to 'crunch 
numbers, ' but 

to develop 
skills. " 









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Winter 



news 




L o r r e ti a 
Santangelo 
of the Ufe Fit- 
ness Center 
reporis tliat 
students 
liave been 
turning out in 
droves to 
use tlie 
scliooi's atli- 
ietic faciii- 
ties. 



LIFE FITNESS CENTER HOURS LACROSSE 



The life fitness center will be open for student use every 
Monday through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 pjn. Aerobics 
classes are held every Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 
11-11:45. There is also basketball, racquetball, ping pong 
and volleyball equipment 

and facilities available for students. If you have any ques- 
tions, call 362-2131 EXT.465. 



as the tempers ^Tso^^ :^"^''^'- ^ '°"g 

2:30 to 4:00. If you Lve^v "Ir "" "^ """'' ^' 

62-213 1 EXT 317. ^ ^ "'""'^ "^ Dr.Somme,^ at, 



Student Senate 

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March 1 and 2. 

Don't Forget To Vote 



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For information about our -B>Biaa^^^^^^^^^^a»i 

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Ciirreni School 

Return to: SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY, 8 Ashbunon Place, Boston, MA 02108 

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THIMK ABOUT IT 




)TN SHEET 



March 10, 1994 



Issue no. 8 Volume XVII 



Cape Cod Community College West Barnstable, MA 



Distributed FREE 




CCCC'Crew Team works out: (from left) Advisor, Loretta Santangelo; Michael Tinker, Captain; 
and Stephen Penlington, President. 

College grapples with expansion 



by NANCY K. BRENNAN 

Op/Ed Editor 

College Meeting, abody of faculty, administrators and 
students, voted to not reccommend to the Board of Trustees 
a proposal from President Kraus to construct a building on 
campus. 

Students and faculty members cited the increase in 
student fees as a result of the expansion, estimates ranging 
fiom $2 to $8.50 per credit hour, as the main reason for tiieir 
denouncing the proposal. 

The $11 million expansion plan for CCCC, which 
started as a "pipe dream" last year, became an urgent real- 
ity, according to President Richard Kraus. The President 
was given a deadline of March 23 to submit a complete and 
thorough proposal to the Higher Education Coordinating 
Council (HECC), in order to be eligible for $5.5 million in 
matching funds from the state for expansion and renova- 
tions. 

Tight classroom space, cramped offices, the need for 
new programs and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 
requirements are the problems at CCCC, according to Dean 
Agustin Dorado, who has been put in charge of developing 
a plan to combat the space difficulties on campus. Accord- 
ing to motions made during the Special College Meeting on 
March 9, several meihbers of College Meeting are "vehe- 



mently opposed to the philosophy and concept that requires 
today's and tomorrow's students to bear the cost of" imple- 
menting ADA requirements on campus, because the college 
is owned by the state. The requirements are mandated by 
the Federal Government. 

The number one priority, according to Facilities Man- 
agement Director, Robert Phillips, is to make sure the col- 
lege complies with the ADA requirements. "Schools have 
to come up with the money to remove the barriers for all 
disabilities," Mr. Phillips said. But the Federal Government 
has not provided any money to Higher Education to make 
the improvements, according to Mr. Phillips, wiiich makes 
the possibility of state fimds so attractive. Many on campus 
beleive that the state or the federal government should be 
fiscally responsible for the laws they have introduced. 

Research began on expansion of the college, which 
focused specifically on the KAO building in downtown 
Hyannis, last year. On March 7, President Kraus and Dean 
Agustin Dorado announced that the KAO project was 
scrapped, wlien the results of an engineering survey esti- 
mated that renovation would cost £q)proximately $12 mil- 
lion. 

CCCC is in line for $5.5 million from the state, and 
must match that'sum with another $5.5 million from vari- 
ous sources including increasing student fees, holding 
fundraisers through the Foundation, and possible help from 

see EXPAND, page 10 



Hate Crimes 

by Patrick W. O'Connor 

special to the MainSheet 

On Tuesday, February 22, a Gay-Bi-Lesbian (GBL) Club 
poster, placed on the bulletin board outside CI 06, was set 
on fire, resulting in permanent damage to the poster, the 
board and the building. 

Since the beginning of this semester, various acts of van- 
dalism have been committed, namely, the destruction of 
posters from the GBL Club. While these acts originally 
ranged from the tearing down, and ripping up of posters to 
the drawing of cross-hairs (crossed lines simulating the sight 
of a rifle), the acts of vandalism have escalated to danger- 
ous proportions. 

This fire has turned these acts from something mildly 
annoying, into what the school and the law categorize as an 
crime. According to John French, Director of Student Ac- 
tivities, the person or persons who set fire to the poster com- 
mitted 3 crimes: 1) Destruction of State Property, 2) Arson, 
3) Hate Crime. The latter offense. Hate Crime, is punish- 
able by immediate expulsion from the college. 

While many on campus may think these acts of vandal- 
ism are rather trivial, this ongoing problem with vandalism 
is something everyone should he very concerned with. Set- 
ting fire to a poster on a p^>er-laden bulletin board coidd 
have resulted in much more serious damage and even en- 
dangered individuals' lives. In order to address this sort of 
violence and put a stop to it, the college organized a Hate 
Crime Panel Discussion, which took place on TUesday, March 
8, 1994. 

Mr. John French, Head of Student Affairs, introduced the 
speakers to a group of students and faculty numbering over 
one himdred and fifty - lecture hall C was filled to standiug 
room only. 

The first speaker was District Attorney Philip Rollins, 
graduate of Dartmouth College and Boston College Law 
School. Former Instructor at CCCC. 24 years District At- 
torney for Barnstable County. He is running again for of- 
fice. "Violence of any type wUl not be tolerated." "Dis- 
crimination of any type wiU not be tolerated." D. A. Rollins 
stated that in order for someone to be charged with a Hate 
Crime, it must be proved that hate motivated the crime. A 
crime may not be enough for a Hate Crime charge, but 
enough for a civil case, which results in a restraining order, 
then violating a restraining order may result in a long prison 
term. DA. Rollins also believes in a "truth-in-sentencing" 
law, an even tougher one than has been just passed. 
. The afternoon's second speaker was Provincetown Police 
Chief Robert Anthony, chief 2 years, police officer for 19 
years. Graduate of CCCC, class of 1978, University of 
Massachusetts, Boston, class of 1992. The biggest point 
Chief Anthony stressed was the concept of "Community 
Oriented Policing." The people of the community, in CCCC's 
case, the students, faculty and staff, must work with the po- 
lice in combating all crime, including Hate Crimes. 

Third to speak was Yarmouth Police Sergeant David Keefe, 
Graduate of CCCC, Bridgewater State and Anna Maria Col- 
see HATE p<^e 7/ 



Program combats tiunger 



>y BOB KOENIG 

Campus Neva's Editor 

Many problems face students at CCCC, but one problem, 
hunger, may overshadow all others, according to Dot Burrill 
of the Adult Re-Entry Center. 

Hunger on campus is an issue that many students may not 
be aware of, however, the problem does exist, Ms. Burrill 
said, and it must be taken seriously by everyone involved 
with the college. 

Many local people are responding by returning to school 
in hopes for a better fiiture, according to Ms. Burrill. She 
explained that this transition in people's lives can be costly. 
One major area from vAuch resources are taken is food, and 
students often go hungry in order to pay for classes, she 
said. 

"There are two kinds of students on campus who have this 
problem," Ms. Burill said. "We have the working poor who 
are barely getting by because they have to pay bills and rent. 



and at the same time, their Financial Aid and Pell Grants are 
decreasing, while tuition and fees are going up." 

"The other kind of students," says Ms. Burrill, "are those 
on food stamps, which just don't stretch for the month." Not 
only are many of these students going hungry on campus, 
but they are also going home to an empty refrigerator, she 
said. 

Ms. Burrill also spoke of one student vAo ate nothing but 
dry lentil beans for one wiiole week. 

"It's bad enough that students are hungry at home," says 
Ms. Burrill, "but trying to go to class and study on an empty 
stomach is difficult, and this problem has to stop." 

The Adult Re-entry Center is, however, getting some help 
from students and from organizations outside the school, 
says Ms. Burrill. A trial-run program called "The Adult Re- 
Enter Center Hunger on Campus Pilot Project" is currently 
under way, she said. The students ih charge of this project 
are, Women and Men in Transition members Kathrvn 

see HUNGER, backpage 



Inside: 




Campus News 

Hate Crimes on Campus 


Pg.3 


Features Pg. 5 

The Computer Doctor answers your questions 


Entertainment Pg. 6 

Jonathan Edwards plays Dream Day benefit 


Brealcing the Boundaries 

Re-entry students give back Pg. 7 

Bacic Page 

Brian's top ten 





Page 2 MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Campus News 




CCCC students Gwen Maynard and Janet Thornton Itold trophies they won at a two-day speech 
tournannent hosted by Tufts University and M.i.T.. Ms. Maynard piaced fourth In prose interpretation 
and fifth in poetry interpretation. Ms. Thorntorn piaced sixth in prose interpretaion. CCCC piaced 
sixth overall In the tournament. Pictured from left is Speech Club coach Prof. Phyllis Lee who served 
as Judge at the tournament, Gwen Maynard, Janet Thornton and time-keeper Donna Patrick. 

pfioto by Hop* Baird 



Three summer sessions planned 



by MEA COSTA 

Staff Writer 

Ib its endeavors to expand and grow to meet the needs 
of the conununity, CCCC will offer a more flexible summer 
program. Two extra six-week sessions will be offered in 
addition to the usual seven week program. 

The first six-week program will begin on May 31 and 
run through July 8. Following that, the original seven week 
session is slated. This session will start June 20 and end 
August S. The final six-week program will begin July 1 1 
and end August 19. Evening sessions will be offered only 
during the June 20-August S session. 

"Flexibility and variety is w*at the College wants to 
offer its diverse student body this summer," says Dr. Hosni 
A. Nabi, Dean of Academic Affairs. Dean Nabi believes 
that three options for taking summer courses offer students 



more variety in choosing a time that is suitable to their 
needs. He does acknowledge that because the programs 
overlap, it would be difficult to take courses during all three 
sessions. It is possible, however, to take courses in two ses- 
sions. 

Since this is the first time that the extra sessions are 
being offered, they will be evaluated at the end of the sum- 
mer. Dean Nabi asks for students to be patient with the new 
program until all of the bugs can be worked out. 

Financial Aid for the summer sessions is limited, ac- 
cording to Director of Financial Aid, Mike Cuff. Since the 
summer program is not considered a required semester, the 
only form of aid available is the Fell Giant. Other forms of 
financial aid will not cover the costs for classes. Also, if a 
student decides to take summer courses, money will be de- 
ducted fix>m the Pell Grant for the fall semester. 



Artwork stolen from Arts Building 



by OARLENE MOKRYCKI 

Editor 

The recent theft of student artwork ftom the Arts build- 
ing has caused Professor Bob McDonald to remove remain- 
ing works to protect them from being stolen. Tbe art work 
was missing from the bulletin boards in the main lobby of 
the building where it had been exhibited. 

Sara Ringler, another art professor, said that the art de- 
partment would continue to display student artwork in the 
Art building. She said that the student body as a vt4iole 
needs to see v/bat the art students are doing. The students 
themselves need to have their work displayed, as much time 
and effort has been put into their projects. She feels that the 



whole school benefits from being able to view these projects. 
It would be a sad commentary if people had to view bare 
bulletin boards in an Art building. The whole school would 
lose out as a community, were it deemed necessary to stop 
displaying the works, according to Mis. Ringler. 

Professor McDonald said that he hoped that the student 
body and feculty would try to be more vigilant to help pro- 
tect any works wliich might be displayed in the future. 

Thomas Edwards of the Student Senate said this theft 
was one of a rash of thefts in recent weeks that has been 
plaguing the school. In addition to the missing art, and miss- 
ing muscleman from the biology department, there has also 
been some metering equipment missing from the science 
building. 



World Federalists sponsor Aletta Root Scholarship 



by EARtE COLLINS 

Staff Writer 

The Cape Cod and Islands Chapter of The World Fed- 
eralists Association is offering The Aletta Root Scholarship 
for a graduating student. 

The $3000 award is open to Social and Behavioral Sci- 
ence majors wlio meet the eligibility requirements and are 
interested in working in the Social Sciences. 

Applicants mtist have attended at least two semesters 
at Caps Cod Community College and graduate in January 
or June 1994. Fifteen credit hours of Social and Behavioral 



science are needed to qualify. Nine credit hours must have 
been completed at CCCC. An overall 3.0 GPA at CCCC is 
required as well as a 3.S GPA in all Social and Behavioral 
Science courses. Applicants must be accepted or awaiting 
acceptance at a four year college or university. 

Committee members for this year's scholarship are Pro- 
fessors Mary Kay Cordill, Leo Lortie, Gary Seeley, W. 
Brooks Smith and Nancy Walker. 

The deadline for submitting applications is March 25, 
1994. All necessary forms can be picked up at the Social 
and Behavioral Sciences Department Secretary in room 215 
of the South Building. 



News Briefs 



Canoe Class Delayed 

Because of severe winter weather, a non-credit course. 
Canoeing Cape Cod's Waterways, will not start until i 
March 24. The course, conducted by Randolph Bar- 
tlett, consists of several classroom sessions followed I 
by a number of two to three hour canoe trips. Canoes, . 
paddles and life vests are provided. The course is : 
intended for novices who wish to learn "common ' 
sense" canoeing and how to enjoy C^)e Cod's ponds, 
rivers and marshes. For more information contact . 
Randy Bartlett, at 362-2131 ext. 400. 

CCCC Summer Camp Registration 

This year's summer day camp will offer a choice of 
three two-week sessions available for boys and girls 
ages eight to thirteen. Registration is now available for 
dates of July 1 1 to 22, July 25 to August 5 and August 
8to 19. The camp will be held at CCCC,s campus using 
the physical educational complex and the Tilden Arts 
Center. A camp day runs from 9 am. to 3 p.m.. The 
emphaJsis is on fun rather than competitive activities. 
The fee per two-week session'is $195. For fuither 
information and a 1994 brochure, contact day camp i 
director Mary Steele Ferguson at 362-2131, ext. 350. 

Janus Players present Cabaret 

Performances will be on March 25, 26, 3 1 and April 1 
and 2, in the Tilden Arts Center. Show times are at 8 ' 
p.m. aU nights and a matinee will be offered March 27 ' 
at 2 p. m.. Tickets are $8 for students and seniors, and : 
$10forthepublic. Formoreinfonnationcall362-2131 
ext. 410 or 362-5554. 

Counseling Office updates selections) 
of college catalogs 

. The Coimseling Office now has a complete set off 
brochures for schools in Massachusetts, New England I 
and various other states. Also available are several I 
different reference manuals to aid students in locating ; 
information for continuing the student's education i 
indexed by subject, major or field of interest a student i 
may vnsh to pursue. Counselors are available to> 
students daily by appointment or on a walk-in basis i 
when time peimits. To make an appointment between i 
9:00 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, day / 
students should Contact Secretary Pauline Wordell at t 
362-2131, ext. 318. Evening student i^pointmentscani 
be scheduled from 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday/ 
through Thursday,by calling Secretary JeanM. Schon- - 
man, at 362-2070. 



Corrections 

The MainSheet apologizes for 
spelling Dean Agustin Dorado's 
name incorrectly in the last issue. 

The MainSheet reported in its last 
issue that transfer rates are re- 
corded and available. Register 
Martin Grace reports that these 
rates are unavailable because 
they are difficult to track. Mr. 
Grace adds that if they could be 
tracked, they v/ould be made 
available. 



n 



CLASSIFIED: SNOWBOARD FOR SALE 

Used, older 150 cm Burton snowboard in good conditio 
with heavy board bag. Post season price $100. Call Blanci . 
in the MainSheet ofTice, 362-2131 ext.323. 



Page 3 MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Campus News 



Math department stands by requirement 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Features Editor 

The Math Department at CCCC is standing by its cur- 
rent math curriculum. Because students are increasingly 
concerned about fulfilling the colleges math core require- 
ment, some have sought alternatives such as those offered 
at Fisher Junior College. Mary Moynihan, a CCCC math 
instructor, cautions students that this may not be the an- 
swer to their problems. 

The Fisher College Math course has a prerequisite of 
two semesters of Algebra vMch. is similar to CCCC. Col- 
lege Algebra at Fisher College has a prerequisite of Intro- 
ductory Algebra II, vMcb in turn has a prerequisite of In- 
troductory Algebra I. They also recommend Preparatory 
Mathematics, w4iich is comparable to CCCC's Basic Math. 
It is technically the same. 

According to Ms. Moymhan, "The CCCC prerequisites 
are for advising purposes only. The prerequisite we recom- 
mend represents the best advice we can give students as the 
preparation they need to be successful in college level math 
courses." 

The Math Department has a prerequisite waiver form, 
which students can complete and sign if they don't want to 
take advantage of this advice. Ms. Moynihan pointed out 
that some students need to develop basic math skills in or- 
der to succeed in college level math classes. " A student has 
the option to take these classes, or sign a waiver form." 

Without the knowledge learned in Basic Math, Algebra 

Student Commentary 



I, and Algebra U, a student may have great difficulty in com- 
pleting the college level math that is necessary for gradua- 
tion. Because of her experience as a math teacher for the 
past fifteen years at CCCC, Ms. Moynihan recommends stu- 
dents take the prerequisite math classes in order to do well 
in the college level math class. 



'The prerequisite we recommend 
represents tine best advice we can 
give students as the preparation 
they need to be successful in col- 
lege level math courses.' 



"The reason we adopted the current prerequisite was to 
ensure that students would be successful in the courses we 
recommended, not to hinder a student's completion of re- 
quirements. If the college as a whole does not want a gradu- 
ation requirement of college math, the Math Department 
could offer a course similar to the consumer math taught in 
high school." 

Ms. Moynihan also went on to say that the college as a 
whole voted to accept the Transfer Compact, which states 
that college level math courses should have a prerequisite of 
two years of high school Algebra and one year of Geometry. 



"If the college chooses not to support these recommenda- 
tions, we can change our math courses. What we can't do is 
lie; we can't offer courses that are not college level and call 
them college level." 

Ms. Moynihan emphasized that the CCCC Math De- 
partment is very concerned about a student's success. There 
are extended math lab hours posted on room 112 in the 
Science Building. Available at the Academic Development 
Center (ADC) are free math tutors, where students can 
schedule an appointment or use the walk in services. The 
math teachers have regular office hours that enable students 
experiencing difficulty to discuss their concerns. 

Currently the math department is experimenting with 
different ideas to improve the math curriculum. A devel- 
opmental education task force meets three times a month 
to discuss improvement in the DE courses. They are trying 
to develop a statistical model to access placement test scores, 
and success rates in DE. 

Professor Gary Getchell is experimenting with an extra 
lab hour in his DE courses and Professor Terry Popp is of- 
fering a five day a week DE-060 to DE-061 course in one 
semester. 

"Once the data is collected &om the statistical study, 
we could adjust cut off scores for placement tests, change 
prerequisites, or maybe change the courses," Ms. Moynihan 
said. "We are working hard to help our students succeed in 
their math courses wiule maintaining standards of excel- 
lence." 



State proposes cuts in park fees, increases tuition 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Feature Editor 

' ' Ironically, as the cost of tuition increases every other year 
and fees go up every year in the Massachusetts State Col- 
lege system. Governor Weld has decided to cut many state 
fees in half The fee cuts are part of the governor's $16.1 
million budget proposal that includes sewer rate relief and 
license fee cuts but the students hopes are going down the 
drain. 

Students at the college level are struggling to buy books, 
put a roof over their heads, food on the table, afford child 
care, and deal with transportation costs. As a result of many 
of Governor Weld's proposed cost cuts, visitors from out of 
state can use state park camping facilities and other ser- 
vices at a savings of SO percent. This hardly seems fair to 
those students y/bo have struggled to get an education in our 
own state college system, and vibo, in the long run, wUl 



become vital working members of the Commonwealth. In 
doing so they will put more taxes and fees back into the 
state coffers. 

The Massachusetts State Park System operates at a defi- 
cit each and every year which means it draws more and more 
tax dollars to keep it afloat. Cutting these fees in half will 
double the tax dollars needed to keep the parks and services 
available for public use. 

If this happens Massachusetts' resident taxpayers will 
foot more of the bill for out of state visitors who vacation 
here. Students face less funding and more struggling in or- 
der to become productive citizens of the Commonwealth. If 
fees must be cut for camping, \n4iy not cut residents' rates, 
and keep out of state visitors rates at the current levels? 

In addition, the state owned campgrounds are now ac- 
cepting reservations. They are competing to the detriment 
of privately owned campgrounds across the state. They may 
force the privately owned campgrounds to close, because 



privately owned businesses can not possibly operate at lower 
rates. 

Tourism is a four to five billion dollar industry in the state 
of Massachusetts. It generates tax dollars and provides jobs. 
The state returns twelve million to the Office of Tourism 
and four million to the grant program to promote this vital 
industry. This is less than one half of one percent. Would it 
not make better economic sense to leave the state park fees 
as they are and increase funding to our Office of Tourism? 
This would generate more money, not create a large deficit 
in the DEM. Then perhaps college students could receive a 
reduction in tuition costs at the state colleges. 
Make your wishes known to the Governor: 

Governor William Weld 

State House 

Beacon Hill 

Boston MA 02133 



The Department of Environmental Management (DEM) 


released a breakdown of the cutbacks. 


Here are a few ex- 


amples: 






ProDosed Cutbacks 


Current Fee 


ProDosed Fee 


Camping with showers 


$12 


$6 


Group camp sites at: 






Camp Rockne 


$24 


$12 


Woodman Pond 


$24 


$12 


Camping at Nickerson 






State Park 


$12 


$6 


Administrative fee for 






Seasonal Waivers 


$30 


$15 


HEY YOU! DONT LET THE MOMENT PASS YOU BY! 




You must advertise in the MainSheet, or forever regret the opportunity lost! 




Call 362-2131 ext. 323 for the fabulous details. 







CLASSIFIED: Looking for room to let 

Baltimore school teacher wants room to let for July and August, 
Mid-Cape area, while employed for summer. Call Charlene, (410) 931 - 
8024. 





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MIR TRY NEW DUNKIN' DARK ROAST COFFEE FOR AN 
H^^/EXCITINCLYROBUSTTASTE THAT'S OUMKIN* 
L ^ ALMOST TOO BIG FOR WORDS. DONUTS' 



Page 4 MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Editorial 



Attending class on snowy days can be risky business 



by BRIAN FORD 

Co-editor-in-chief 

On Friday, Feb. 11, Cape Cod was hit with the worst 
snowfall in years. Roadways became snowy obstacle courses, 
making traffic almost as thick as the falling snow. Area 
schools were all let out before the road conditions grew to 
extremes, yet the administration at CCCC insisted on keep- 
ing students until 2:00. Why? 

This was a case of poor judgement exercised by our 
administrators. The snow started falling heavily by 8:30 
a.m., and by 10:00 there was already about 3 inches on the 
ground. School systems all over the Cape were closing as 
early as 11:00, leaving parents attending CCCC no other 
choice but to stay home and take care of their children. Were 
they excused for the classes they missed that day? I doubt it. 

What about those students vAio live in Provincetown or 
off the Cape? If those students used their better judgement 
that day (one of the goals of this institution is to teach people 
to do that), chances are that they felt it was too dangerous to 



drive such adistance, so they either stayed home or left early. 

What about the rest of the college? By 1:00 there was 
already about six inches of snow on the ground. I wonder 
what percentage of students who had class at 1:00 actually 
went. Probably about the same percentage as parking spots 
taken (the parking lots were desolate at 1:00, for those of 
you who weren't there to notice). I had class at 1:00, but I 
didn't bother to go because I felt the roads were bad enough 
without another hours worth of snowfall. 

Did I get penalized? I hope not, seeing that the class 
was canceled because of low attendance. Perh^s class would 
have gone on as scheduled if I did show up, however, I was 
not willing to take theichance. Call me a wimp for using 
better judgement 

What if someone were hurt, orkiIle4 driving to or from 
school that day? Who would be responsible for that? Cer- 
tainly not the hard-working student who would risk his or 
her life to get to class on time. 

News flash, everyone! You shouldn't have to risk your 



life to get to school. Decisions involving the safety and 
well-being of the student body traveling on treacherous roads 
are left to the administration. Let them risk your life. B 
will save you the trouble. 

On the other side of the coin, two weeks later, on Feb. 
23, classes were canceled after 3 p.m. because of, you. 
guessed it, more snow. However, the decision to cancel 
school on the 23rd was made promptly and responsibly But 
again, it still raises questions as to why they waited so long 
to cancel classes on the 11th. 

How bad does it have to snow to cancel classes? 
Wouldn't anyone think to make this decision before putting 
any lives in jeopardy? I hope that in future instances, the 
administration uses a little more discretion wbea dealing 
with a decision concerning the safety of the students here. 
We should all hope more class time won't be lost because of 
the weather, but in case it does, we would like to make sure 
these decisions wiU be dealt with responsibly. 



If You're gonna get sick...Get real sick. 



by DARLENE MOKRYCKI 

How sick would you have to be before you'd go to the 
CCCC health facility? Well, if you were me~pretty sick. 

In the past, any experiences that 1 have had with the 
CCCC health facility have been rather fhistrating. While 
their brochure touts a wide range of free or low cost health 
services for students, obtaining these services is, at best, 
inconvenient. 

For example GYN exams (with pap smear) must be 
scheduled. They are only done on Fridays, in the morning. 
They are scheduled twenty minutes apart. In all my life, I 
have never had a GYN exam which could be completed in 
20 minutes. 

As my particular appointment was being scheduled, I 
mentioned to the person domg the scheduling that I had a 
class at 9am, and that an 8:30 ^pointment would not be 
enough time. She said, "it will be enough time, we have 
another appointment at 8:50." 

I needed the exam, so I concurred and made the ap- 
pointment. Needless to say, on the day of the exam, I ar- 
rived and was made to fill out the usual volume of paper- 
work, and also a "one time only" p^)er, too. This took 
time. The GYN professional was late by five minutes more. 

In the examining room, I obediently got on the exami- 
nation table, now it was 8:45. The exam began, and as the 
practitioner peered into her work (me) I mentioned that I 
had to leave for class in 5 minutes. She replied, sitting up, 
"I can't be rushed." 



"Thank God," I thought, whereupon the exam ended, I 
got dressed and stomped out without my Pap smear having 
been done. A waste of my time and a waste of someone's 
money, too. Not mine, mind you, but someone's, maybe 
yours. 

Their repeated attempts at rescheduling the appoint- 
ment fell on deaf ears. I refused any further contact after 
the initial attempt to reschedule where they tried to get me 
to agree to another 8:30 appointment. One thing about the 
human condition, some of us at least, learn from our expe- 
riences. 

I asked aroimd and other students had had less than 
satisfactory experiences, also. 

One student, Charles Thibodeau, said that he had got- 
ten something in his eye, and went over to health services 
v/beie he was told that the eye area is too sensitive, and that 
they wouldn't deal with it. He was given a couple of names 
of local doctors to go see; no eye bath, no eye patch, no 
assistance, no relief whatsoever. With a foreign object in 
the eye, hew is one supposed to get to one of these "local 
doctors?" 

I phoned over there and asked what would happen if I 
wanted to see a doctor? I was told that it would be neces- 
sary to make an appointment. The doctor is available be- 
tween 8:30 and 10:30 on Wednesdays. Well this is fine, 
were I to have no classes during that period. But I do. I 
have classes which I cannot afford to miss. What recourse 
do I have? None! Miss class, or miss the doctor. Neither 
choice is appealing. Obviously these things cannot be sched- 



uled without being in conflict with some students' sched- 
ules. Perhaps the budget prohibits any additional hours. 
Perhaps the doctor's schedule does, too. What happens v/bso 
the problem initiates on a Wednesday afternoon? Wait a 
week. Pahleeze. 

If I could wait, I would go to my personal physician. 
Actually if I couldn't wait, I should go to my personal phy- 
sician, too. But he is 30 miles away, where I live, and I am 
here, 5 days a week, all day long. 

The other day the inevitable happened. I had an emer- 1; 
gency. Now for the real test of this system. Suddenly 1 
couldn't breathe. I went over to health services, and said. 
"I am having trouble breathing. I have the school insur- 
ance, what do I do? Where can I go?" The receptionist 
handed me a medical insurance card which she peeled ofi 
from a pile and said, "You can go to anyone, anywhere. Yof 
can even go to the emergency room." 

This was the most helpful thing that could have hap- 
pened. I did go to the emergency room, where I was taken 
care of immediately and with little or no rigmarole. Within 
an hour, I was feeling better, had had a chest x-ray, EKG, 2 
inhalation ther^ies, a shot of Prednisone, and some antibi- 
otics for yibat had been diagnosed as bronchitis, and asthma. 
Everything went well. I am still in awe as to how smoothly 
everything went. 

To answer my own question: How sick would I have to: 
be to go to tlie school health facility... pretty sick! 



Some students have prehistoric notions about welfare 



by NANCY K. BRENNAN 

Op/Ed Editor 

During a class recently, the subject of welfare was brought 
up. I now know how thoroughly ignorance has permeated 
this campus, and society in general. 

The Welfare discussion was inflamed by a person who 
has appointed himself Judge and Jury of anyone whom he 
sees as a liability to society - a view that generalizes and 
blankets the entire spectrum of people in the lowest socio- 
economic class. He judges a group of individuals - his gen- 
eralizations transcending all races, religions, both sexes - 
and he does so with no knowledge, no insight, and no con- 
sideration. 

He preaches change, yet he offers no solutions. 

He preaches responsibility; yet he owns none. 

He preaches reform, but he's no lobbyist. 

I say, Welfare recipients want reform. 

He says. Yeah, they want more money. Baam. 

Baam! Baam. Baam? He has stolen the term "Baam" 
from the infant son of Barney Rubble - a child who dons 
diapers and bangs a club. Is this a person I woidd go to seek 
advice on how to change the Welfare system? Baam! I 
would like to take this poor, ignorant soul and trade places 
with him for a month. I'd like to have his struggles, his 
responsibihties, his problems. I could use a vacation. 

We can't expect people to change without some educa- 
tion. 1 think that perhaps those who judge Welfare recipi- 
ents, do so out of hatred or maybe fear, of things they don't 



understand. To someone vibo has never had to struggle, the 
concept of poverty must seem foreign. To someone who's 
never missed a meal, the idea of hunger seems silly. 

Since my first semester at CCCC, I've been workmg for 
change in the Welfare system. I've been fighting to make 
education a priority of Welfare. I've written letters, offered 
solutions, considered the obstacles. I worked with a woman 
who spends days at the State House in Boston, fighting for a 
better system. And yet in my three years at CCCC, I have 
never seen anyone who vocally opposes Welfare stand up 
and take action. Like Rush Limbaugh, they'll criticize, but 
that's all they're able to do. 

Those of us who care - who don't speak for the simple 
pleasure of hearing our own voices - are working to reform 
Welfare. We want to see the cycle of Welfare generations 
stop. We want to see people taking "personal responsibil- 
ity." We want to see men and women gain higher self-es- 
teem, motivation, inspiration. These things won't happen 
just because someone says, "You have to take personal re- 
sponsibility." The problems people who end up on Welfare 
face are much deeper, and far more traiunatic than people 
on the outside could ever imagine. And yet, they judge. 

I watch a friend of mine, a Welfare mom, sit with her nose 
in a book from 7 am. to well after most of us have gone 
home - even on days when school in closed. I said to her 
once, "Why are you here all the time?" Her answer was 
simple. "I need to do well so that I can get off Welfare." 

Is that someone who is taking personal responsibility? 
More so, I think, than most people. Does she fit the stereo- 



type? Is she an exception? Absolutely not. 

Those of us w4io have had to struggle to go to school, to 
raise our families, will have an educational advantage. Vfi 
will carry every day, for the test of our Uves, the knowledge 
of vibat it's like to be poor. And you can bet that we will 
never rub poverty in the frice of anoflier human being \\4io ii 
dealing with adversity. We'll know better. 



MdlNSHEKT 



Editorial Staff 

Brian Ford, Melissa Phaneuf, Nancy Brennan, Amy 
Paine Gold, Jack Higgins, Bob Koenig, Terri Ladd, 
Darlene Mokrycki, Bryan Russell 

Contributors 

Edward Almedia, Julie Biggs, Sue Celli, Earle Collins, 
Mea Costa, Robert Cunier, Carole Donahue, Debroah 
Etsten, Elizabeth Gouveia, Joseph Gouveia, Jana Jones, 
Sybil Owens, Lori Perry, Michael Torre, Richard Weath- 
ers 

Faculty Advisor 

William Babner 

The MainSheet Is • member ofNECNA 

(New England Collegiate Newspaper Association) 



Pages MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Features 



Secretary of State candidate visits CCCC 



by PATRICK W. O'CONNOR 

Special to the MainSheet 

On February 16,1 994, Cape Cod Community College was 
forhmate to have a distinguished guest speaker - Former 
Democratic State Representative Augusto F. Grace. Mr. Grace 
is cunently a candidate for Massachusetts Secretary of State 
and a partner in the Boston office of the law firm Gadsby & 
Hannah. Mr. Grace is also the brother of Mr. Martin Grace, 
CCCC registrar. 

Mr. Grace spoke for approximately an hour on various is- 
sues relating to American government and Black History 
Month. Mr. Grace's talk started out with a pseudo-quiz on 
American Black History. He utilized a format similar to that 
of Johnny Carson's "Kamac.the Magnificent" in which he 
read answers from envelopes and then proceeded to give the 
correct questidfl. 

All of Mr. Grace's answers and questions dealt with Ameri- 
can Black History. Facts such as: 1619- First black in the 
continental U.S.; February 1638 - First blacks in Massachu- 
setts; Benjamin Banniker - black scientist who designed 
Washington D.C; Gary Morgan - black inventor \ndio de- 



signed the first electric traffic lights, illustrated that most of 
the audience was not asfamiliar with American black history 
as they could have been. 

Following this introductory history review, Mr. Grace dis- 
cussed various aspects of State government. Specifically, he 
talked about how individuals can effectively lobby our 
elected officials. 

One of his more interesting techniques was that when lob- 
bying a particular official, one should first find out what his 
or her interests and experiences are, then tailor the lobbying 
effort around that information. 

Another helpful hint divulged by Mr. Grace was that pro- 
spective lobbyists should know the overall schedules of the 
offices they are trying to influence, in order to have adequate 
time with their targeted off icial(s). For example, Mr. Grace 
briefly, described the Massachusetts Legislative Schedule: 
from January to February the legislature has a slow schedule 
- the bills to be reviewed must be printed and that takes a 
month or so. March through May the legislature is very busy 
taking part in various committees. From June through July 
the annual budgets are being reviewed and there is Uttle time 
for seeing lobbyists. From August to September the legisla- 



ture is on vacation - if you can find your official, this is the 
best time to personally talk to him or her about your cause/ 
concern. From October through December the legislature is 
once again very busy and exfremely pressed for time. 

If one cannot get one's particular elected official to vote a 
certain way, Mr. Grace explained, a referendum is still pos- 
sible which deals with the particular issue by adding it to the 
next election ballot. Requirements for adding such a refer- 
endum include obtaining a certain number of voter signa- 
tures in order to get it attached. Mr. Grace said a referendum 
is an excellent governmental tool because it allows the aver- 
age person to bypass the legislature and asks the voters di- 
rectly to decide whether the issixe merits a new law or a 
change in a present law. 

In closing, Mr. Grace answered several questions posed by 
students in the audience. He repeatedly stressed that each 
and every one of us should become more aware of and more 
involved with our Local, State and Federal governments. 
. He reiterated that if one doesn't like what elected officials 
are doing, tell them, and keep telling them until a satisfac- 
tory result is obtained. 



Scanning your floppy disc prevents viral infection 




Jerry Schmeer 



byJERRYSCHMEER 

The Computer 
Doctor 

This week anew fea- 
ture debuts in the 
MainSheet: The 
Computer Doctor. 
CCCC's own com- 
puter doctor, Jerry 
Schmeer, will answer 
any computer re- 
lated questions. Ad- 
dress any questions 
to Jerry, in care of 
the MainSheet, in 
the Upper ' Com- 
mons. 



What is a computer virus ? Why do I have to scan my 
disk before and after using the Cape Cod Community 
College computers ? 

Computer viruses are diabolical little programs written 
by computer hackers to cause pain, misery, and grief to 
both computerusers and computer technicians alike. They 
may inflict damage as minor as playing music in the back- 
ground or flashing messages on the screen as the user 
woiks on various programs, to major damage such as stoip- 
ping proper fiinctioning of the computer hardware and 
software. These programs CAN go as far as destroying 
all programs and data on both the computers bard disk 



and user's floppy disk. 

Today, there are over 2400 different virus programs out 
there. New ones are created every day! (A list of many of 
these VIRUSBS and the damage that they can inflect can be 
seen in the computer lab). 

Wuses are transmitted v(4ien a computer user puts his or 
her floppy diskette into an infected machine. The virus pro- 
gram then writes itself on the user's diskette. Once the user's 
diskette has become infected, it in-tum infects all machines 
that this diskette is used in. Every new user of the infected 
machine may also find that their diskette has also become 
infected. Then, every computer that these newly infected 
disks are used in also becomes infected. With the great 
amount of use that the college's computers receive each day, 
dozens of machines can become infected, along with hun- 
dreds of diskettes. If this infestation is not caught immedi- 
ately, in a matter of days, the entire campus can be infected. 
This scourge can slowly spread to the community as stu- 
dents take their computer diskettes home and to the office. 

To help control this problem I have set up computer virus 
scanning stations in each of the computer labs. By scanning 
your diskette BEFORE using any of the Community 
College 's computers, you protect the machines from becom- 
ing infected, and thus, odier students diskettes. By scan- 
ning your diskette AFTER using the College's computers, 
you can find out if your diskette has picked up any viruses 
from the machine that you were just using. Hopefiilly, this 
will help you to avoid losing your 50 page term p^jer, or 
destroying all the software on your machine at home wdien 
you bring an unfriendly computer virus home with you. 
These are events that happen almost every semester. SO 
PLEASE SCAN YOUR DISKS !!!! 



Why don 't more computers on campus have Microsoft 
Windows and Windows based programs on them ? 

Of the 80 computers in the academic computer labs, 3 
out of 4 of them are 8088 or 80286 based computers and 
unable to support this platform. 

Why do I have so much trouble using 5 1/4" disks in 
the computer labs ? 

Actually, if you use a LOW DENSITY 360K 5 1/4" 
disk in S114, S115, or S117 you should have no prob- 
lem saving or using your diskette - IF you STAY in any 
one of those classrooms. BUT, you viill start to run into 
major problems if you use that LOW DENSITY 360K 5 
1/4" diskette in S108. In S108, the 5 1/4" diskette drive 
are HIGH DENSITY 1.2M drives and are not very 
friendly to the low density 360K diskettes. Although 
the reasons are more technical than I want to get into 
here, my advice is to NEVER use a low density 5 1/4 
diskette in SI 08 if you use any other computer lab. If it 
doesn't hs^pen IMMEDIATELY, you WILL eventually 
lose your data, your term paper, or what ever informa- 
tjbn you diem valuable. I realize this presents a prob- 
lem if you have a class in S108 and have to do your 
homework in one of the other open labs, but unfortu- 
nately that's just the way it is. llie best solution at the 
present time is to use a HIGH DENSITY 1.44M 3 1/2 " 
rigid disk whenever possible. Thanks to money recently 
redirected by the Student Senate and the President, there 
are now some of these drives in every computer lab. 



Campus plagued by understaffed offices 



by BRIAN FORD 

Co-editor 

Several offices on campus, including the Financial Ai4 
Office, the Business Office, Student Activities and the Coun^ 
seling Office are not sufficiently staffed to handle the vol- 
ume of students attending CCCC, according to Dean of Stu- 
dent Services Richard J. Sullivan. 

In past years, when staff members left CCCC for retire- 
ment or other jobs, their vacancies were most often not filled, 
in order for the college to save money. As a result, the exist- 
ing staff has taken on enormous workloads. 

The Financial Aid Office has not seen a staffing increase 
in many years. "In 1988-89, about 1000 students sqjplied 
for financial aid. Now we handle twice that amount of ap- 
plications, and we still have the Same number of people in 
the office," says Joan Marland, a Financial Aid secretary. 

Although the Financial Aid Office has not been a victim 
of layoffs and serious cutbacks, their workload is still at a 
higher level than ever before, according to Michael Cuff, 
Financial Aid Director. 

see STAFF, backpi^e 



This chart represents the Increase in students who applied tor financial aid, relative to the number of 
students enrolled at CCCC. 
SOOOr 



NUMBER OF 
STUDENTS 




SPRING 91 



SPRING 92 



SPRING 93 



SPRING 94 



White = Number of students who applied for financial aid. 
Grey = Number of students who received financial aid. 
Black = Total number of students enrolled in CREDIT courses. 



Page 6 MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Entertainment 



Jonathan Edwards appears at Dream Day benefit 



by JACK HIGGINS 

Entertainment Editor 

A benefit concert was staged recently at Christines din- 
ner and concert club in Dennis. Headlining the show was 
singer-songwriterJonathan Edwards. 

The benefit, organized by Margaret Leonar4 founder 
and president of Dream Day on Cape Cod, was originally 
scheduled for Friday February 1 1th but was held on Sunday 
February 13th because of a major snow storm. 

Had the show happened as scheduled, there would have 
been a larger turnout, but the smaller crowd on the make up 
date made for a very relaxed atmosphere, almost like a party 
with close firiends. 

On this evening Edwards was in fine voice (he mentioned 
the fact several times that he doesn't smoke anymore), and 
musically, I felt, he was superior to the last time he per- 
formed here on the Cape. 

The set list Edwards drew fiom included songs from all 
segments of his career. From his first album "Jonathan 
Edwards," wWch contained the top 40 hit "Sunshine," to 



"Stardust Cowboy," and "Lucky D^y" He also played a 
song from a to date untitled disc called "If It Would Only 
Stop Raining." It was a wonderful breath of fresh air to see 
Edwards doing something new. This new disc should be 
released later this spring. 

Accompanying himself on guitar, piano, and harmonica, 
Edwards played one great time after another, even throwing 
in some tongue-in-cheek little ditties, including "Sticks and 
Stones," "Sure I Used To Smoke," and "I Got A DOG." 

Edwards especially shone when he did the tunes from 
his first album, which are crowd pleasers every time. In 
fine voice, and perfect tone Edwards cruised through "Ev- 
erybody Knows Her," "Cold Snow," "Athens County," "Dusty 
Moming,""Emma," "Shanty," "Sunshine," "The King," 
"Don't Cry Blue,"and "Jesse," before ending with a marvel- 
ous version of "Sometimes in the Morning." 

It was a fine show for a great cause, it's too bad there 
weren't more people there to enjoy it, and to support such a 
worth'wMe cause. 

A special thanks to Christines, for donating the room for 
the benefit and to WMVY for their support also. 




Singer-songwriter Jonathan Edwards. 



New organization raises funds to tielp ct)ronically ill ctiildren 




Dream Day on Cape Cod • P.a Box 1919 • Coniit. MA 02£3S • 50S428-2052 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Features Editor 

Jonathan Edwards recently performed at Christines 
restaurant to benefit Dream Day on Cape Cod which is a 
newly established non-profit organization. It provides en- 
hancing experiences for children who have cancer and other 
chronic life threatening iUnesses. 

Tim Favley, a tug boat captain who thoroughly en- 
joyed the outdoors and the sea, was diagnosed with malig- 
nant melanoma in May of 1990. Favley, who died in May 
1993, met children with cancer wMe he was undergoing 
chemother^y treatments. He started Dream Day on the 
Sound for these children in Coimecticut. 

Margaret Leonard, v/bo was a close friend of Tim, 
created Dream Day on Cape Cod. She wrote to the 



Barnstable County Sheriffs Department looking for help. 
She received backing from Sheriff John DeMello and his 
assistant, Peter Robbins. 

One of the main goals of Dream Day on Cape Cod is 
to create a camp for these children so they can enjoy out-, 
door activities while coping with their iUnesses. Another is 
to help out in anyway possible financially, and everyday 
living expenses that these frunilies accrue. 

Dream Day debuted on July 11th, 1993 with an out- 
ing at the Barnstable County Sheriffs 'Vbuth Ranch. Activi- 
ties included: helicopter rides, horse rides, volleyball and 
great food. This will be a yearly event, which is sponsored 
by the Barnstable County SheriffI Department. For more 
information concerning this program, you may write to: 
Dream Day on Cape Cod P.O. Box ,1919 Cotuit, Ma. 02635 
or call 508-428-2052. 



CD reviews: 



Liz Phair 

Exile in Guyville 

by EARLE COLLINS 

Liz Phair has made one of the most dar- 
ing musical debuts in years. Exile in 
Guyville, her double length debut, is a song 
for song response to the Rolling Stones al- 
bimi Exile on Main Street. 

Spin magazine ranked her album number 
one for 1993 and included her in its list of 
Artists of the Year. Rolling Stone magazine 
profiled her, assuring she will be a huge suc- 
cess. Thispublicity is paying off with her 
albtun entering the alternative top ten. 

Phair songs are filled with all types of men 
dealt with everyday. They range from ob- 
jects of sexual desire to washed up idols. 

The women Phair creates are just as var- 
ied. Spme are apologetic for their actions 
w*ile others couldn't care less how they are 
perceived. 

Musically Phair uses any style she feels is 
appropriate. She isjust as likely to play solo 
as use a complete back up band. Her voice 
keeps an even tone through all the songs no 
matter the tempo of the music. 

"Help Me Marry" is a plea to control a 
woman's anger over acting the way men want 
her to. Despite her disgust she practices the 
moves that will make men notice. 

The stereotypical male hero is crushed in 
"Soap Star Joe." His actions are seen as ways 
to gain fame, "He won't leave town till you 
remember his name." Instead of showing 
respect for the hero Phair seems amused by 
him. 

On "Canary" Phair soimds sorry for per- 




forming for a man. Phair sings hesitantly; 
almost ashamed of admitting the acts she 
does repeatedly for a man. 

"Girls! Girls! Girls! " takes aim at men and 
women. The audience is well warned that 
Phair expects to be in charge of herself. She 
uses men to get what she wants. She is sick 
of women who insult other women standing 
up for themselves. "I get away almost ev- 
eryday with what the girls call, girls call, 
girls call murder." 

The argument of wiio caused a break up is 
the focus of "Divorce Song." ""Vbu've never 
been wasted of my time," is sung with just 
enough sarcasm to know wdiom she blames. 

"Flower" deals with a woman's sexual fan- 
tasy with a complete lack of emotion. "Ev- 
ery time I see your face I think of thoughts 
un pure, unchaste," is simg in a zombie like 
monotone. The tone of voice Phair uses to 
describe v/bat she wants to do to a man is 
more frightening than arousing. 

Such a strong debut is sure to be followed 
by other excellent albums. With an attitude 
and talent that can back it up, Liz Phair will 
achieve wiiatever success she wants. 





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Animal Bag 

Offering 

by JACK HIGGINS 



Since their debut disc in the fall of 1992, 
Animal Bag has toured the country virtu- 
ally non-stop. During a break in their gru- 
eling schedule, the band recorded 5 of the 7 
songs on this disc in a friends living room 
in Los Angeles, the other 2 were done in the 
recording studio during the tour. These 2 
songs just happen to be the only cover songs 
that the band does. 

The Music on this disc, "OFFERING," 
gives but a glimpse of the many faces of 
Animal Bag. 

The opening song on this disc, "If I," is a 
surreal acoustic- electric flavored tune that 
moves ahead in the mode of Pink Floyd. 
The mostly acoustic arrangement harnesses 
this cut to much, this song would soar had it 
been more electric flavored . But the vocals 
move smoothly through the mix, which 
keeps the cut together, and even. 

"Dun Ringhill," an old Jethro "Ml tune, is 



the first of the bands cover tunes. This one 
stays almost exact to the original. The intro 
is just a bit to Zepplinesque, yet the acousti- 
cal ringing sound throughout the song more 
than overrides this. 

The third cut, "Tom," is a disturbing, yet 
heartfelt tune that is written about a friend 
who commits suicide. Not knowing who 
or wliat to blame the reflection comes to 
light, "wiien a moth flies to the light of the 
fire, tell me who is to blame." The soulful 
slide guitar work in the song both accents 
the subject matter and the musical arrange- 
ment of this "reflection of a friend." 

Next appears the bands second cover tune, 
Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Youngs "Wooden 
Ships." Thisisagreat arrangement of this 
song,although a bit spacier than the origi- 
nal. The vocal harmonies are good, and the 
subtle guitar work lends a special edge. 

"Mother" seems to be a little piece of some 
of the best acoustic flavored music of the 
70's. The intro is directly out of a Jethro 
TUll mode. When the vocals emerge it 
sounds as though Paul Kantner of The 
Jefferson Airplane is sitting in with the band. 
Then, as the rythym track breaks through, it 
is utmiistakably "Captain Walker", from The 
Who's, Tommy. 

"Last One" is probably an out take from 
the bands first disc. The last song, "Mo- 
ment," is a strikingly beautiful song that in- 
froduces a mandolin into the sound mix, 
which almost entirely layers over a very sub- 
dued, distant vocal track. Basically this is a 
short wonderful instrumental. 

Animal bag has shown that they can play 
acoustically as well as electric, but for their 
futitfe in the music world to grow they must 
gain more focus. This disc was much more 
focused than their first, but choose a road 
and find path to greater success. 



Page 7 MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Breaking the Boundaries 



''AND AIN'T I A WOMAN?'' 

- Sojourner Truth 

Students give back to the Adult Re-entry Center 



by NANCY BRENNAN 

Op/Ed Editor 

Kathryn Somma 

Kathryn Somma is a member of the Women in Transition 
program who is striving to make college a positive experi- 
ence for herself, and for those around her. Ms. Somma, a 32 
year-old psychology student at CCCC knew she wanted to 
be a part of the WIT program when she met Dot Burrill, direc- 
tor of the Adult Re-entry Center (ARC), and Professor Helen 
Goolishian. 

"ARC and WIT in particular for me, have been wonderful 
programs," said Ms. Somma in a recent interview. "Dot Burrill 
has been inspirational, not just in my life, but in the way I see 
her reach out and find resoiu'ces." 

Ms. Somma pointed out that women and men come to the 




center for support, for resources, even to share baby-sitting. 
More recently, she has begxm working on the program the 
Adult Re-entry Center has begun for the many students on 
campus who come to school hungry each day (see related 
story page 1). 

Ms. Somma volunteered for the ARC Hunger on Campus 
Pilot Program, along with Men in Transition's Sean Woodley 
because she said that when she thought of the Cape and its 
resources that she couldn't believe the hunger which exists 
here. "There's no room for htinger in our country. Anybody 
going hungry is a personal experience for me. It's offensive. 
It's wrong." 

Dot Burrill said that Ms. Somma is "intensely interested in 
helping other students." She said that Ms. Somma has "a 
special insight into the needs of people in the ARC." 

Sean Woodley 



Sean Woodley left his home in Ireland, travelled the world 
and ended up on Cape Cod. He sought the support of the 
Men in Transition program of the Adult Re-entry Center when 
he decided to come to college, and is now working to give 
something back for the help he received. 

Mr. Woodley said, "It's been a dream to go back to school." 
Through the help of the ARC, he's been able to succeed. "I 
didn't find it difficult to ask for help," Mr. Woodley said. 

Mr. Woodley is currently working with Kathryn Somma on 
the Hunger on Campus Pilot Project. He volunteered for the 
program because it was a way for him to help other students. 




Kcithiyn Somma 

However, he points out to other people on campus that it's 
not necessary to volunteer in order to receive the support, 
resources and friendship which are part of the ARC'S pro- 
grams. "People are under enough stress," he said. But in case 
some students were struggling with their pride about asking 
for assistance, he expressed that they could help out like he 
does, to "earn his keep." 

Dot Burrill, director of the ARC, said that since Mr. 
Woodley entered college, he's been "right on and has fol- 
lowed through on anything he's done. He's a wonderfiil vol- 
unteer." 

Mr. Woodley said that for many students, if they have as- 
sistance, they won't quit school so easily. And he added that 
his success has a lot to do with ARC and encourages others to 
seek help if they need it. 



Sean Woodley 

Women's History Month: Advice from the past rings true today 



ty NANCY K. BRENNAN 

"bp/Ed Editor 

When I think of women's history, I think of the coura- 
geous females who fought for the right to vote, to choose, to 
jjam. Women who fought for the freedom hold decent jobs, 
Ao still fight for equal wages. Women vAo took chances, 
rent to jail, were shunned by their connmunities for what 
jliey thought was right. Women who risked their lives for 
|!ie sake of a seat at the front of a bus. And let me not forget 
jiose women who pledged and continue to pledge their lives 
p their children, their husbands, their partners. 

I would like to offer some wisdom, in celebration of 
iVomen's History Month, that comes not from me, but from 
iome of the women who have worked so desperately to see 



that freedom means the same to everyone in America. 

"It was we, the people, not we, the w*ite male citizens, nor 
we, the male citizens; but we, the wiole people, who formed 
this union." - Susan B. Anthony 

"The growth of man is two-fold, masculine and feminine. 
They are so as Energy and Harmony; Power and Beauty; 
Intellect and Love." 

- Margaret Fuller 

"No woman can call herself free who does not own and con- 
frol her body." - Margaret Sanger 

"It is time to stop giving lip service to the idea that there are 



no battles left to be fought for women in America." 

- Betty Freidan 

"She holds things together, collects bail, makes the landlord 
patch the largest holes. At the Simday social she would spike 
every drink, and offer you half of what she knows, which is 
plenty." 

- Judy Grahn 

from "Nadine, Resting on her Neighbor's Stoop" 

"It was then I knew that the healing of all our wounds is 
forgiveness that permits a promise of our return at the end." 

- Alice Walker 

from "Good.Night, Willie Lee, I'll See you in the 
Morning" 



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Campus Life 



Faculty Commentary: Life is a Cabaret 



by P.J. MCKEY 

Director and adjunct faculty member 
Fine & Performing Arts 

The Janus Players, CCCC 's own play production com- 
pany, will be presenting the musical "Cabaret," opening 
March 25 and running for six performances. But get your 
tickets early! "Cabaret" is Broadway musical theatre at its 
best— the Broadway musical when it really began to thinlc 
and explore tough, provocative themes, beginning a legacy 
that includes "Evita" and "Kiss of the Spider Woman." 

"Cabaret" opened on Broadway in 1966 and ran away 
with eight Tony Awards, including "Best Musical." It ran for 
1,165 performances, broke new groimd for subject matter 
and subsequently, through the magic of stage and fihn, made 
stars out of Joel Grey and Liza Miimelli. But don't come 
with your old expectations of this musical. "Leave those 
troubles outside!" 

This production will create the cabaret world for ova 
audience, complete with waiters, entertainers, and refresh- 
ments, wliich will povide a deeper coimection with the world 
of the play. This is not the type of show where the audience 
will sit back, comfortably removed from the action. The au- 
dience will be seated at tables, of course, cabaret style, and 
will find themselves right in the heart of the lives and ac- 
tions of our incredible cast of characters. They vsall find 
themselves in fliat airless comer of 1929 Berlin known as the 
Kit Kat Klub, where sex and jokes preceded the hate that 
became the Third Reich. "Cabaret" manages to focus its 
seriousness through the entertainment and political humor 
provided by this cozy little comer of depravity, where the 
wom girls are all "virgins" and sex and money are the only 



virtues. A symbol for what was soon to be Jiappening of the 
streets of Berlin, for what we see happening on the streets 
today. 

But there is another world in this play, full of ordinary 
people, swept up in the emotional and political turmoil of 
Germany between the wars— a BerUn overw^iehned by heavy 
inflation and economic chaos. There's Fraulein Schneider 
trading her emotional needs in order to hang on to her board- 
ing house, wWch is home to Cliff, our wandering American 
writer, Sally the runaway playing dangerous games, Fraulein 
Kost who services the Navy and has for years, and the inno- 



They are all laughing and- trying 
to live and love, but there's 
something in the shadows." 



cent Jewish grocer Heir Schultz, whose world is on the brink 
of extinction. Of course everybody sings, but this is a dan- 
gerous world— a world about to fall a{>art. They are all laugh- 
ing and trying to live and love, but there's something in the 
shadows. 

I don't think that it's coincidence that the history of the 
past few years, the Neo-Nazis, the hatred in Bosnia and eth- 
nic fear world-wide, have given rise to movies such as 
"Schindler's List" and a sold-out run of "Cabaret" currently 
playing in London. The bigger danger is our own attitudes 
of apathy and a sense that things don't concern us. That's the 
reason I was drawn to direct this play. I understand how 



Hitler seduced a nation. They were looking the other way. 
The Germans were obsessed with escape, plagued by feel- 
ings of helplessness, and riddled with a lack of faith in their ' 
government. They were ripe for someone to take control, to 
give them a sense of purpose. The Berlin of this place is a i 
wild, lost child. That's what Ilike about it. That's udiat scares 
me about it. It's exciting theatre! However, no one goes to 
the theatre for a lecture. The broad appeal of this musical is 
its ability to both move and entertain us. What was startling 
about the play when it opened continues to capture us. There 
are times in rehearsal when I get goosebumps-when I can 
feel the power of Joe MasterofF's scripts, and the magic of 
Joe Kander's and Fred Ebb's lyrics and music. I hope you're 
lucky enough to get a ticket. 

Musical Direction will be by adjunct faculty member, 
Elizabeth Kelly, a well-known Cape Cod conductor, choir 
director and vocal teacher whose nimierous credits include 
professional and amateiff musical theatreptoduction. Cho- 
reography will be by CCCC's alumni Michael Jordan, a lo- 
cal award-winning choreographer and visual artist. Set and 
lighting design will be by Tilden Arts Center Technical Di- 
rector Christopher Hofinann, with costumes designed by 
Brewster artisan and CCCC student Jan Doucette. The tal- 
ente4 amazing and Villous all-Cape cast of 30 is made up 
of students, faculty (acting teacher Jim Silverman) and vet- 
eran community actors. This dedicated company will sur- 
prise, delight, and challenge you! "So-come to Ae Cabaret!" 
Performance dates are: March 25, 26 at 8 p.m, and March 27 
at 2 p.m. and also the following weekend, March 3 1 , April 1 , 
2 at 8 pjn. Tickets are SIO general admission, and $8 stu- 
dents and seniors. Box office hours are Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday 10-3. 



Eating disorders affect one in five college-aged women 



by MELISSA PHANEUF 

Co-editor 

Eating disorders such as bulimia and anorexia are life 
threatening iUnesses that affect an estimated seven million 
women and one million men in our country, according to 
Judith Anderson in an article in the March 1994 issue of 
Glamour Magazine. 

This fact alone, according to Ms. Anderson, should earn 
those people struggling with eating disorders such as 
Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia at least a little empathy, but 
unfortunately it often does not, explained Ms. Anderson. 
Eating disorders are commonly looked at as being some- 
thing to hide, a thing of vanity, or a phase one is going 
through. 

According to a study done by the National Association of 
Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) , a col- 



Just AsIc Billy! 



lege-age woman's chance of developing an eating disorder 
is one in five. This study indicates that eating disorders are 
not a thing that only happens to higji school age girls. These 
diseases affect women and men of all ages. 

Sufferers ofan eating disorder, have been told by doctors 
that one is never cured. The recovery process can take years. 
According to therapists, eating disorders are similar to ad- 
diction to alcohol. One is usually either working at recov- 
ery or in a rel^se, and victims are rarely actually consid- 
ered cured. 

According to Judith Anderson's article in Glamour 
Magazing, fortunate victims manage to overcome eating 
disorders, often with the help of others. Less fortunate per- 
sons spend long periods of time hospitalized, or in special 
clinics wliich exist for eating disorder patients. 

Judith Anderson also says that eating disorders are very 
serious iUnesses that do not receive much federal funding; 



and that not enough research has been done about the dis- - 
eases to find a cure, or even help to lessen the pain and I 
emotional distress that is a result of the diseases. 

She says that in order to research these disorders, funding ; 
is necessary from the federal govenunent. Some pe<^le feel I 
that because the diseases are suffered primarily by women, , 
that the government has been more apt to neglect the prob- - 
lem. However, Ms. Anderson points out that because die ; 
illness is looked upon as a result of vanity, men and women i 
trivialize its importance. 

Anyone seeking assistance or imformation regarding ; 
Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, or other eating disorders has > 
an eating disorder, or would like to join the National Eating ; 
Disorder Coalition to help raise fimds for research for these : 
diseases, please write to Judith Anderson, P.O. Box 706, , 
Woods Hole MA 02543. 



Billy Disties ttie dirt on Nancy, Tonya and MTV's Bad Boys! 




Dear Walt: 

You are, by no means, the only person who feels that 
Nancy is a pristine, pampered, snobby *itch. If noth- 
ing else, we should salute Tonya Harding for having 
the guts to be herself— on and off the camera. Nancy 
on the other hand would like us to believe that she is 
the proverbial symbol of goodness— always smiling 
for the camera. 1 would just like to remind her that 
no matter how much she shovels it out, there will 
always be people like you and I wearing boots to 
save our shoes. 



Dear Billy: 

When will we have a Black History Course at CCCC? 



Dear Billy: 

Who do you like better—Beavis orButthead? 

Signed, 

Just Wondering 



Dear Just Wondering: 

In my spare time, that last thing I want to do is watch 
two screaming teenagers wiggling their sicrawny, , 
pimple-ridden butts on my TV set Shut off your 
TV and do your homework! 



Dear Billy: 

Why?!? Why me?!? Why am I the only one who thinks 

Nancy Kerrigan is a pristine, pampered and snobby 

*itch?!? 

Yours truly, 
Walt Disney 



Signed, 

Charles Thibodeau 



Dear Chariest 

I checked with the Registrar's .office and much to 
my surprise there is a course offered entitled Race, 
Class and Culture in the United States (HB-206). 
This course is not exclusively Black History, but I 
hope it's a step in the right direction. Check the 
description on page 16 of the Spring 1994 Evening 
Class brochure to get the details. 



Just Ask Billy! is a new advice column by student, Billy 
Lewos. Billy has created this column for the MainSheet 
to entertain and give advice to anyone yfflio may have any 
questions about school, work, relationships, dysfunctional 
families, or life itself. If you have any questions for Billy, 
write to JUST ASK BILLY!, c/o MainSheet, Cape Cod 
Community College, Route 132, West Barnstable, MA 
02668. Or just drop your question by the MainSheet of- 
fice, located in the Upper Commons, right here on cam- 
pus. And remember, Billy is your fiiend, too. Don't be 
afiaid to ask. 



Entertainment 



Page 9 MainSheet March 10, 1994 



"LEAVE YOUR TROUBLES OUTSIDE . . . " 




The Janus Players pre- 
pare for their production 
of "Cabaret." 



"Come to fhe Cabaret, 

here life is tjeautiful . . ." 



"CABARET' Is about to make its de- 
but at CCCC with a cast of 31 tal- 
ented all-Cape performers. The Ja- 
nus Players, CCCC's play production 
company, will take you into a caba- 
ret in Germany, on the brink of World 
War II. 



II 



COME 



TO THE CABARET! 



OLD CHUM 



II 



"CABARET" will be 
presented at the 
Tilden Arts Center on 
March 25, 26, 31 and 
April 1 and 2, at 8 
p.m. A Matinee will 
be presented March 
27 at 2 p.m. 



Page 10 MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Features 



Senate President offers his view on expansion plan 



by THOMAS EDWARDS, SR. 




In the wake of the special College Meeting, many 
members of the faculty, staff, and administration of this col- 
lege have offered sincere congratulations to the Student Sen- 
ate. You have expressed feelings of gratitude for the Senate's 
efforts to get the student body involved in what many of you 
consider the single most important issue in the history of 
this campus. 1 join with you in applauding their outstanding 
efforts. I can not find the words to express the pride and 
admiration I feel for every member of the Student Senate 
and the Student Trustee. I worry, however, that you are over- 
looking the tremendous effort made by a very involved and 
committed group. I worry that you are overlooking your- 
selves. 

On behalf of the student body, I would like to thank 
all of you for your commitment and involvement. Regard- 
less of which side of the issue you fotmd yotirselves on, you 
all showed tremendous concern and compassion for the 
present and future students of this college. Many faculty 
took time during classes to ensure that students were kept 

EXPAND, continued from page I 

state appropriations. 

President Kraus, Dean Dorado and a committee called 
the Task Force on Adequate Space, have been researching 
the feasabilities of building on campus, remodeling the ex- 
isting buildings, purchasing existing buildings off-campus, 
or purchasing modular classroom imits. The March 7 plan 
entails construction of a new building on campus, which the 
administration originally considered too costly to be feasable. 

Dean Dorado had intended to complete a detailed pro- 
posal, utilizing input from the Task Force, by May. The 
proposal would then be recommended to College Meeting, 
and finally to the Board of Trustees. If the Trustees ap- 
proved the proposal, it would then be sent to Chancellor 
Koplik, and the Higher Education Coordinating Council. 

On February 23 at the Task Force meeting, the time-ftame 
for completing the proposal changed, according to Presi- 
dent Kraus. He said that the finalized report would have to 
be approved and on the Chancellor's desk no later than March 
23. The shortening of deadlines from three months time to 
three weeks occurred because Secretary of Education Piedad 
Robertson claimed to have secured enough funds to cover 
the capital projects, but stated that she could only retain the 
money for a short period of time, according to President 
Kraus. 

President Kraus announced the change in deadline at the 
Task Force meeting on February 23 and said that he was in 
conflict over what his recommendation to the Trustees would 
be, because the time frame was so limited. "On the other 
hand," he said, "everything else I know tells me this is a 
good idea." 

Professor Dale Lumsden said that he felt uncomfortable 
with the March deadline. According to Dean Dorado, spe- 
cific areas of concern, such as impact on student fees, would 
be minimal. 

An estimated additional $8.50 per credit hour would be 
the increase. This charge would be in addition to an antici- 
pated 3 percent tuition increase from HECC. 

President Kraus said that he could give^'no assurance thatl 
questions wiU be answered," by the March 23 deadline. 
However, in a memo dated February 28, President Kraus 
said that he assigned two teams to "work through the week- 
end" to have a specific plan completed by March 7 or 8, 
before Spring Break. 

The President faces some strong opposition from the fac- 
ulty. Professor Brenda Boleyn of the Science Department 
sent out a memo vMch said, "It is also no secret that Presi- 
dent Kraus is singularly interested in this plan, having de- ' 
clared it 'the only train leaving the station.'" 

"Whether to board this 'train,'" she wrote, "is arguably 



apprised of the rapid changes occurring in the planning 
phases. Many administrators took time out of their busy 
schedules to speak to student groups and clubs. Many staff 
members took on overwhelming amounts of extra work to 
enable others to keep us all informed and involved. To all of 
you I can only say that the students were following your 
examples of dedication and as such you should all be very 
proud. 

Many of you have compared the feeling of the past 
few months to the feeling during the late 1960's and early 
1970's. I put it to you that you don't have to look that far 
back. I put it to you that you can look back less than a de- 
cade to find an even better comparative example. 

During what was undoubtedly the worst fiscal crisis 
in the Commonwealth since the Great Depression, the fec- 
ulty, staff, and axlministration put all personal feelings aside 
and pulled together to save this institution. Sacrifices were 
made that involved not only time and effort, but emotions 
and even paychecks. We are here today because of that com- 
mitment to this institution and this commtmity. That is the 
history of this institution. That is the example that the Stu- 
dent Senate tried to follow. That is the standard that we, the 
students, have tried to bear and carry forward. For that, I 
again offer a heart-felt thank you to all. 

With that said, I urge the student body to bear in mind 
that, with the recommendations made at the special College 
Meeting, we have only just begun a long and arduous jour- 
ney. We have only established our desired starting point. We 
have not established the paths we will take or the destina- 
tion we hope to reach. There is much more that we can and 
must do to ensure that Cape Cod Community College has 
the capabilities to continue to offer a high-quality education 



Professor Brenda Boleyn 

the most far-reaching and potentially risky decision to come 
before this college since its inception." 

Professor Boleyn recommended that Task Force should 
prepare an "institutional impact statement" to determine the 
"monetary and non-monetary" effects to all groups on cam- 
pus. 

Gail McCormick, Chairperson of the Business Depart- 
ment, said in a February IS memo that it is necessary to 
collect information regarding the present campus, its pro- 
grams, equipment, classroom space and its ability to com- 
pete. Otherwise, she said, "we, as a college community, 
will be making decisions which may not be the best solu- 
tions to our defined problem(s)." 

Dean Bruce Bell, of the Science and Math Departments, 
said that this is "the most important decision the college has 
ever had to make, " and that it would be foolish to rush into 
any serious commitments without researching them fully. 

Students are also questioning the impact of the expansion 
plan. There is an estimated increase of 22.6% in student 



at a cost that is affordable to the community it serves. 

If members of the College family can sacrifice so 
much to safeguard our best interests, we should be willing 
to do no less. If not for ourselves, then for our children and 
our children's children. As members of the community, we 
must make our voices heard on the state level as clearly as 
we have made them heard on the local level. We can write 
and call our state and local legislators and let them know 
that we resent that our college has been underfunded for- 
years. We can let them know that we resent paying the bill 
to bring state-owned property up to federally-mandated stan- 
dards. We can let them know that very dedicated people 
have worked under very difficult conditions for far too long. 
We can let them know that we charge them with the duty of 
ensuring the future of our college, and we will hold them 
accountable. 

The responsibility for the future of this institution is a.-. 
very heavy burden that has been placed on the shoulders of' 
a relative few people. Instead of complaining ^^en those; 
people can no longe bear the weight, we must share the 
load and thereby lighten it. 

We have an obligation as students and as members of 
the community to stay involve4 make our voices heard, 
and give back some of the tremendous amount of energy 
that the various faculty, staff, and administration has expe- 
nded on our behalf for over three decades. 



Editor's note: 

Thomas Edwards. Sr. is president of the Student Senate, 
and a member of the Task Force on Adequate Space, 
which has been reviewing plans to expand the campus. 




dent Kraus is singularly interested in this plan, having de- 
clared it 'the only train leaving the station.'" 

"Whether to board this 'train,'" she wrote, "is arguably 
the most 6r-reaching and potentially risky decision to come 
before this college since its inception." 

Professor Boleyn recommended that Task Force should 
prepare an "institutional impact statement" to determine the 
"monetary and non-monetary" effects to all groups on cam- 
pus. 

Gail McCormick, Chairperson of the Business Depart- 
ment, said in a February 15 memo that it is necessary to 
collect information regarding the present campus, its pro- 
grams, equipment, classroom space and its ability to com- 
pete. Otherwise, she said, "we, as a college community, 
will be making decisions \^ch may not be the best solu- 
tions to our defined problem(s)." 

Dean Bruce Bell, of the Science and Math Departments, 
said that this is "the most important decision the college has 
ever had to make, " and that it would be foolish to rush into 
any serious commitments without researching them fully. 

Students are also questioning the impact of the expansion 
plan. There is an estimated increase of 22.6% in student 



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Campus Life 



Page 1 1 MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Student Survey: 

How have you, or ore you going to handle the math requirement at CCCC? 



photo* by T—tl Lmdd 





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Brendan Emmett 
Liberal Arts 

"I just dropped intermediate al- 
gebra. I took it in high school 
and don't think I should have to 
take it again. The teaching style 
was boring and noninteractive." 



MaryAvellar 
Liberal Arts 

"I had to start at elementary al- 
gebra and will also take inter- 
mediate algebra before I can 
even take the required course. 
It's a pain in the butt." 



Sue Carey 
Visual Arts 

"I am in elementary algebra and 
really struggling. I am very 
concerned about getting 
through the requirement be- 
cause I want a degree." 



Kristy Hurtt 
Accounting 

"I have to work up from inter- 
mediate algebra so 1 wiU be tak- 
ing a math course every semes- 
ter as well as in the summer. " 



Jeff Hatch 
Criminal Justice 

"1 had to change my major from 
computer information systems 
because of the math require- 
ment. Criminal justice requires 
a math or a science." 



New Fee 
Proposed 



by NANCY K. BRENNAN 

Op/Ed Editor 

President Kraus recormnended a new fee in order to 
raise revenue for the expansion plan. The fee, called the 
"New Technology Fee, " and will cost students S3 per credit 
hour beginning this summer, according to a memo from the 
President dated March 14. 

The "New Technology Trust Fund" will be included in 
the proposal, and will be established in order to "accept and 
expend monies generated from the New Technology Fee." 
Students in both credit, and non-credit courses will be re- 
quired to pay the fee—up to twelve credits, according to the 
proposal. 

President Kraus said that the fee increase would keep 
the cost at CCCC in line with the state average for commu- 
nity colleges, which $954. He said his goal is "to see to it 
that the students do not have to fund this building program," 
and that wlien new revenues come in, he would "shift the 
proceeds to another use." 

But sources close to the administration said that the 
true purpose of fee was to by-pass the c^ set on All Purpose 
College Fees and tuition by Chancellor Stanley KopUk, ac- 
cording to an article in the C^)e Cod Tunes on March 14. 

Chancellor Koplik, of the Higher Education Coordi- 
nating Council (HECC), proposed the c^ in order keep col- 
lege affordable for "all segments of society." 

According to the Times article, the "fee levels hinge on 
whether the state increases funding for higher education." 
President Kraus said that in an ideal society, he would have 
"jailed myself for my recommendations." Hqwever, he 
preesented them to the Board of Trustees on St. Patrick's 
Day 



HATE coniinued from page I 

lege. 23 years as police officer Instructor at CCCC and 
Anna Maria College. Instructor for Massachusetts Crimi- 
nal Justice Training Council. Sergeant Keefe stated, "Hate 
Crimes chea^n and diminish eadi and everyone of us." He 
also said that, "Sensitivity Training is essential. 

The fourth and final speaker was Detective Lieutenant 
James Cummings, 19 years Massachusetts State Police De- 
partment. Graduate of Northeastern University and Anne 
Maria College. Det. Lt. Cummings covered the Hate Crime 
Reporting System. According to Det. Lt. Cummings, there 
is a specific form police departments fill out when report- 
ing a hate crime. This form is filed statewide at 10 Com- 
monwealth Ave. Boston. The form is very specific: it asks 
for the type of hate crime, the type of act perpetrated against 
the victim. This form is designed to protect all of our Civil 
Liberties. 

On community poUcing, Det. Lt. Cummings said: "Ev- 
eryone remembers 'Policing', but everyone forgets the 'Com- 
munity' part. Community Policing cannot be just words." 




The Suiftones 



Barbershop's alive and kicking at CCCC 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Features Editor 

Coming to CCCC on Tuesday March 29th, are the Cape 
Cod Surflones, featuring the Cape Cod Chord Company. They 
will be performing at 1 :00 p.m. in the studio theater located 
in the Tilden Arts Center. Admission is free, and the audience 
is invited to sing along. This event is sponsored by the Acad- 
emy for Life Long Learning. 

Before radio and television families had other ways of en- 
tertaining themselves. Families would gather in the parlor 
around the piano and sing together. Many of the songwriters 
of that period vwote songs that regular people could sing. 
They wrote melodies that were appealing, and in a range that 
the ordinary people could sing. They wrote about sweet- 
hearts, home, mother, Dixie, and other nostalgia. Songs like: 
"Let Me Call You Sweetheart," "Sweet Adeline," and "Down 
By the Old Mill Stream." 

Men would gather under sfreet lights and sing the popular 
songs. The leads would sing the melody. A bass improvised 
harmony below the lead; a tenor improvised harmony above. 
The baritone improvised harmony sometimes above, and 
sometimes below the lead. 

In 1938 O.C. Cash wandered the lobby of a Tulsa hotel 
after a long business day and needed to unwind. He met 
Rupe Hall, who could sing baritone. They found a tenor and 



a bass, and spept the night singing in four part harmony. 
They had so much fun they decided to rent a room for the 
foUowing week and advertise for other men interested in har- 
monizing. On the scheduled evening Tulsa experienced a 
king-size traffic jam, as men made their way to the hotel for 
a night of close harmony. Cash and Hall decided to form a 
permanent singing society. They named the society 
S.RE.B.S.Q.S.A - The Society for the Preservation and En- 
coiffagement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America. 
Newspapers reported the event, and the society spread across 
the country. 

Today the barbershop society in the U.S.Anumbers38,000 
men. 

The Surftones are the Cape Cod chapter of S.RE.B.S.Q.S.A. 
Men from all over the Cape meet once a week to sing the old 
songs and experience the magic of the barbershop seventh 
chord. Many do not know how to read music, nor are they 
professional singers. Listening is the way they learn. The 
Surflones feel they have a wonderful way of dealing with 
stress created by the stressful world we live in. They invite aU 
men who enjoy close harmony to join them. The Surftones 
meet every Monday evening at the Unitarian Church on the 
comer of route 6A and Hyannis Road in Barnstable. They 
begin at 7:30 p.m. ringing chords, and end at 9:30 p.m. with 
refreshments. For more information call: 888-6887, 255- 
3288, or 432-5391. 



Back Page 



MainSheet March 10, 1994 



Student Profile: Sean Grenier 



Photo 

Not 

Available 



L WHAT DO YOU SEE YOURSELF DOING IN FIVE 
YEARS? "Getting ready to graduate from U-Mass 
Amherst." 

WHATARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE SUMMER? 

"Partying!" 

ARE YOU A FOLDER OR CRUMPLER OF TOI- 
LET PAPER? " A crumpler." 

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT MAKING CCCC A 
SMOKE FREE CAMPUS? "I hate the idea. I think 
there should be a vending machine, or the school store 
shoidd sell cigarettes." 



NAME: Sean-Paul Phillip Grenier 

AGE: 18 

MAJOR: Psychology 

WHAT IS YOUR REASON FOR ATTENDING 
CCCC? "So I have a reasonable career in the future." 



WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE BODY OF WATER 
AND WHY? "The Atlantic Ocean because East Coast 
beaches are the best." 

WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST PET PEEVE? 

"Someone 's saliva on my cigarette when I let them have 
a drag." 



TOP TEN BEST THINGS 



STAFF, continued from front page 



"We haven't had anyone cut, but with more of a volume 
of students these days, more financial aid forms must be 
processed." Since the paperwork has increased, die staff 
hasn't, and Mr. Cuff sqid, "we'd like to get at least one more 
fiill-timer, but two would be great." 

Summer is the busiest point for the Financial Aid Office. 
During the Summer months, all students who are eligible 
for Financial Aid must complete their files and be awarded- 
-a process wtaich is time consuming, according to Mrs. 
Marland. She said that with one more person around the 
office, the phone-calls, s^pointments and p^Ktwork could 
be manageable. 

At this point, the Finaiicial Aid Office handles more than 
2000 applications each semester, with about 1400 students 
receiving financial aid. The office currently employs three 
fiill-time workers, one part-time worker, and two Avoik-study 
students. 

Students vi4io had to wait in line on March 1 1 to receive 
their financial aid disbursments, know first-hand how frus- 
trating understaffing can be. Student Pamela Pumphrey 
asked why the lines were so long, and only two people were 
helping students. She was informed by a source close to the 
Administration, that the Business Office only employed four 
people to assist students, and that half of them were at the 
desk. The other two staff members, the source said, were 
needed in the office to assist students with questions about 



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their checJcs. 

Student Sean Cassidy asked, vAule he waited in line at the 
Busmess Office, if the Student Senate could do anything 
about the staffing problems. 

Understaffing is a problem wliich also affects the students. 
Dean Sullivan said. "We have to be the only college in Mas- 
sachusetts without a full-time director of student activities." 
In fact, the current Director of Student Activities, John 
French, is employed only part-time, and has been for sev- 
eral years. 

The Counciling Office, \«4iich is expected to be expanded 
in size and resources, according to a plan from President 
Kraus, is also limited in staff, said Dean Sullivan. Though 
the plan involves larger space, it does not include funding 
for more staff. 



8. 



1 



ABOUT CCCC TELE- 
COURSES 

by MELISSA PHANEUF AND BRIAN FORD 

Co-editors-in-chief 

10. You can go to classes in your underv/ear. 
9. You don't need thie smoking room to smoke 

a butt. 

Don't worry about parking-you're already 

snowfed in. 

You have the ability to say to your kids, 

"Watch it gosh-dam-it, you might ieam 

something!" 

You can blame late homework on the U.S. 

Postal Service. 

Now you know how to program your VCR. 

Better food is only a kitchen away. 

Hungover students can puke in the class 

room. Just make sure you clean it up 

before mom corries home. 

You always have a date after class If you 

rent the right movies. 

You can look at tuition as a jacked-up 

cable bill. 

Hunger, continued from page 1 

Somma, a Liberal Arts and Psychology major and Sean 
Woodley, a Liberal Arts major. 

Ms. Somma said "most importantly, students vfho need 
help should not hesitate to come to the Adult Re-Entry Cen- 
ter if they are hungry." Ms. Somma added that, "We at the 
ARC are here to give support and guidance to those in need, 
and no one should feel uncomfortable about coming to see 
us." 

Ms. Burrill made it clear that anyone needing assistance 
will have complete confidentiality, and that food agency re- 
ferrals will be made by the staff at the ARC. 

According to Ms. Burrill, some agencies and organiza- 
tions that are donating food to the college are, the Council 
of Churches, and they donate non-perishable foods. Others 
are. Gleaners, who donate bread and baked goods, and there 
is also SHARE, vMch donates fresh produce and meats at 
about half price in exchange for two hours of community 
service. 

Ms. Somma's and Mr. Woodley's fight against hunger on 
campus is under way, but they need help, says Ms. Burrill. 
"The way to help," says Ms. Somma, "is for students to vol- 
unteer. And the best method to start is to go to the Re-Entry 
Center and drop off a schedule of times they are available." 

Students are welcome to volunteer. "Those wiio need as- 
sistance," says Mr. Woodley, "can earn their keep by doing 
volunteer work in exchange for food." 

Ms. Somma also says, "We need as many students as pos- 
sible to volunteer by answering phones, bagging and sepa- 
rating groceries and just donating food." 

Education and hunger don't mix well, and the students 
experiencing this problem are becoming upset and distracted 
from their school work, says Ms. Somma. She also says, 
"An adult comes into the ARC, and it's clear they're in dis- 
tress. -They just start telling us how they're feeling and how 
they don't have money and that they haven't been eating 
right." 

These students also need guidence on receiving proper 
noiuishment, says Mr. Woodley, and they can get that by 
going to the ARC. Mr. Woodley is there to help, and he 
says, "We try to educate people on how to eat right by in- 
fomting them on getting fbs nutrients they need." 

Many of the problems students &ce concern Ms. Somma, 
but people not eating -is really disturbing to her, and, she 
says, "When I think of all the wealth there is on the Cq>e, I 
just can't believe that hunger exists." 



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March 31,1994 



Issue rid. 9 Volume XVII 



Cape Cod Community College West Barnstable, MA 



Distributed FREE 



Waiting for the sun 




Bev Delaney, Joanne Raymond and Joshua Wbalen, all liberal arh majors, enjoy the spring weather 
outside the Lecture Hall. photo by TmtH imu 



Building plan controversy rages on 



by MEA COSTA 

Staff writer 

The Campus Building Expansion Plan was approved 
on March 17 by CCCC's Board of Trustees. In this plan a 
$3 "technology fee" will be added per credit hour, and non- 
credit hour, to help pay for the $1 1 million renovation and 
expansion project. 

The $11 million is to be divided in half so that $5.5 
miiUion will come firom local sources-students, and Health 
and Education Finance Agency (HEFA) bonds. The other 
$5.5 million will reportedly be funded by the state. 

The expansion proposal will be scaled back substan- 
tially if the college does not receive sufficient increases in 
its budget, in the state fiscal 
years 1995, 1996, and 1997. " — 

Controversy about the 
Building Plan is abundant 
throughout the college. Faculty, 
staff ahd administrators are spUt 
on whether or not students 
should have to pay for a state- 
owned building— a building ______________ 

'vMdi many see as unnecessary. 

In arecent special College Meeting on March 9, mem- 
bers offlie CCCCmeetingstatedthatthey were, "vehemently 
opposed to the philosophy and concept that requires today's 
and tomorrow's students to bear the cost of bringing Com- 
monwealth property into compliance with ADA, (American 
Disabilities Act), and occupancy permit standards." 

Absent other fee increases, the technology fee will add 
$36 to the price of atypical full time, 12 credit hour course 
load, increasing the total cost form $960 to $996t- 

Many students are upset that the trustees did not cap 
the fee increase at $3. Thomas Edwards, Student Senate 
President said, "When the Building is paid off 30 years from 
now, they did not bother to make any stipulation that the fee 
would be reduced. Students won't be able to afford this for- 
ever," Edwards said. 

Mr. Edwards also stated that receiving enough funds 
from bonds may not be logical. At the price the bonds are 
selling for and their annual percentage rate, people may not 
see the investment as worthwiiile. "For all intents and pur- 



poses, the students are given the burden of all the money," 
Edwards stated. 

Mr. Edwards also believes that although the ideas for 
the Building Plan are meant to be beneficial to the school, 
they are based on "ideals". 

Would these "ideals" hold up against reality? CCCC 
President, Richard Kraus firmly believes that they will. The 
goal he states is "to see to it that the students do not have to 
fund this building program." 

In his Building Proposal to the Board of Trustees, Presi- 
dent Kraus talked of shifting the new technology fees to 
other uses that directly benefit the students, just as soon as 
other resources are available. 

As for financial aid for students, as of now there is not 
enough available. President 
■^^— — ^^^-^^^— — Kraius met with trustees and 
said that between now and the 
fall, there will be a heavy con- 
centration on finding money 
for additional aid. He sug- 
gested a drive to raise endow- 
ments to provide scholarships. 
__________________ As for the probability of 

the Building Plan going 
through, on a scale of to 10, with being no chance at all. 
President Kraus gave the plan a 6.5. In essence, the Build- 
ing Plan may have a better than half chance of becoming a 
reality. 

There is another problem that has caused even greater 
alarm about the Building Program. In the section of Presi- 
dent Kraus's proposal to the Trustees, entitled "Future Un- 
controllable Bumps or Cliffs in the Road," he states that be- 
tween now smd the fall, the overall program could be killed. 
As a result, "In the unhappy instance, instead of 50 percent 
local money, we will be looking at 100 percent focal money 
to meet the needs our program is designed to meet." The 
Building Plan may be destined to exist with or without aid 
from the state. 

Deborah Currier, Public Relations Officer of the Stu- 
dent Senate, reacted to this statement, "The Building Pro- 
posal Plan ideas are a step in the right direction, but we 
can't afford it now." Continued on page 2 



The expansion proposal will be 
scaled back substantially if the 
college does not receive suffi- 
cient increases in its budget 



UMass 
Dartmouth 
offers bach- 
elors degrees 
at 



by AMY PAINE-GOLD 

Features Editor 

Starting in September, Cape Cod residents won't have to 
go over the bridge to attend evening courses leading to a 
bachelor's degree. 

Richard A. Kraus, President of CCCC, and Chancellor Pe- 
ter H. Cressy of University of Massachusetts Dartmouth have 
announced that the two Institutions will combine resources 
to offer upper level university courses at CCCC facilities. 

"This is a very bright day for CCCC and for the University 
of Massachusetts Dartmouth; but, more importantly, it is a 
very bright day for the people of the Cape and Islands. The 
implications for educational opportunity are enormous. The 
prospects for future economic development are very sub- 
stantially enhanced," President Kraus said. 

Chancellor Cressy agreed with President Kraus' enthusi- 
asm. " UMass Dartmouth recognizes its responsibility to pro- 
vide a four year educational opportunity for all the citizens 
of Southeastern Massachusetts and the Cape Cod region. 
We are delighted to join hands with CCCC and their innova- 
tive president Dr. Kraus to develop convenient opportunities 
for students of all ages on Cape Cod," Chancellor Cressy 
said. 

" Having personally lived on Cape Cod for the last three 
years, I take a personal interest in ensuring that as a public 
university, we meet the changing academic, technological 
and economic needs of our region." 

Many Cape Codders are happy about the new policy. 
Aljaraien Islam, a student at CCCC, majoring in Accounting, 
felt that this was a good opportunity for Cape students. 

"It would be really convenient for people here on the Cape. 
It sounds good tome. It benefits the college too, and would 
enable the student to receive a four year degree right here on 
Cape Cod. They won't have to go over the bridge to achieve 
this." 

Denise Dusas, majoring in Liberal arts, agreed. "It's a good 
idea. I was going to go on to a four year college off Cape. If 
this happens, I won't have to. This will save me a lot of travel 
time and I can continue my education here at CCCC." 

The courses that will be offered first in September wiU be 
in the fields of business and nursing. A survey will be taken 
to see what Cape Cod residents would request in other pro- 
grams of study that would be of major interest. 



Inside: 



Campus Life Pg. 7 

Students, conmiunity join to commemorate Holocaust 



Entertainment 

Rick Danko plays Christines 

Features 

Just Ask Billy! 

Back Page 

Student Survey: Who controls the clicker? 



Pg.6 
Pg.4 



il 



Page 2 MainSheet March 31, 1994 



Campus News 



AAUW Scholarship Available 



By Amy Paine Gold 

Features Editor 

The American Association of University Women, Cape Cod 
branch, is offering a $ 1 000 scholarship this spring to a resi- 
dent of the Cape and Islands. The requirements for appli- 
cants are you must have two years of college study and be 
accepted in an academic program leading to a bachelor's 
degree. Special consideration wall be given to a re-entry stu- 
dent. 

Applicants are required to submit a completed applica- 
tion, official transcript of college records and at least two 

Non-Traditional students 



references. 

Application forms may be obtained by writing to: AAUW 
Scholarship Committee, P.O. Box 82 South Hanvich, Ma. 
0266 1 . Inclose a S.E.S.E. For more information call 349-2741 
OR 760-1442. Deadline to apply is April 15th. 

For more then a century the AAUW has promoted equity 
and education for woman. The Cape Cod branch has awarded 
over 50 scholarships over the past 25 years. 

The Scholarship Committee is chaired by Betty Arnold 
and includes Lillian Batchelder, Primrose Craven, Kathryn 
Duim, Beth Flanagan, Jane Haven, Lil Phillips, and Deborah 
Wmg. 



change 



by MIKE TORRE 

Staff writer 

The number of non-traditional students at CCCC has been 
sky-rocketing in the past few years. Students vAo graduate 
from high school and go directly to CCCC, may find them- 
selves in the minority, according to statistics prepared by 
the Registrar's office. 

Registrar, Martin Grace said the median age of students 
has gone from 27 to 30 in the last two years. Mr. Grace 
added that women make up 65 percent of the college's popu- 
lation. The majority of the women attending CCCC are 
single mothers. 

Not only have there been changes in the average age of 
students on campus, but the manner in which they get 
through school has also changed. 

Most students try to schedule the bulk of their day classes 
between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., Mr. Grace said. The mothers 
who have children in elementary school can drop off and 
pick up their kids with ease if their schedules conform to 
those of their children. 

Nora Greene, a Hotel and Restaurant Management ma- 
jor, said she works two part-time jobs a week, takes care of 
two kids and attends classes fiill time with her husband. 

Other people opt for a slower pace and go part time. "I 
have seen students take as many as ten years to graduate," 
said Mr.Grace. He said some people work during the day 
and attend school at night, taking only a few classes at a 
time. 

The Adult Re-Entry Center's (ARC), Women and Men in 
Transition Programs (WIT and MIT, respectively), assist 
new and returning non-traditional students. The programs 



currently have about 95 people enrolled. 

ARC office manager, Anne Marie Babineau has seen the 
WIT and MIT programs expand from a small women's or- 
ganization, vvWch came into being in 1988 and ran eve- 
nings only, to the highly successful operation it is to<}ay 
Ms. Babineau said that now, as many as 16 men and women 
show up for the information sessions which are held each 
week. 

Joseph Gouveia, a Literature and History major, and a 
member of MIT, said he entered the program "to get out of 
a dead end job and to pursue a positive career." 

Sue Carey, a WIT student, who has a husband and three 
children, said she was tired of being stuck doing the sam& 
things. She said she had gone as far as she could on her 
previous education, and that her goal was now to attain fi- 
nancial independence. 

Student Activities Director, John French, said the increase 
in non-traditional students poses a new challenge for his 
department. 

"We now have to create pro- 
grams for 18 to 60 year- 
olds," he said. 

Mr. French added that time 
can be a big problem for 
many of the students. "We 
rarely do anything at night 
anymore," he said. 
"Instead, we have a wide 
range of clubs, like the Gay- 
Bi-Lesbian Club, the Ethnic 
Diversity Club, and the Ex- 
plorers Club." 




Student Senators Elected 

Students elected nine of their peers to the Student Sen- 
ate. Freshmen chosen were Hope E. Baird of Cummaquid, 
Robert Gushing of Yarmouthport, Jae Flanders of West 
Yarmouth, Mark Lancaster of Buzzards Bay, and Mat- 
thew Stillson of Hyaimis. The new sophomore senators 
are Joseph A. Gouveia of South Yarmouth, Raymond 
Morris of Buzzards Bay, Scott Segal of South Yarmouth 
and Robert Turner of South Dennis. 

"Bowl for Kids' Sake" 

Sunday, May 1 has been chosen for the 12th annual 
"Bowl for Kids' Sake" Celebrity Bowl-a-Thon at Ryan 
Family Amusements in South Yarmouth and Falmouth. 
The event is sponsored by Big Brothers/Big Sisters of 
Cape Cod and the Islands. Those wishing to bowl must 
have their applications in before April 22. Participants 
are also eligible to win prizes. To bowl , contact Bowl-a- 
Thon coordinator Dr. Shirley Crandall at 771-0430 or 
771-6398. 

Sea Change 

CCCC's magazine of the arts is accepting submissions 
(short stories, poetry, art) for its 1995 issue. See the door 
of North 237 for details. 

Business Department Guest Speaker 

Mr. Stephen Bernard, founder of Cape Cod Potato Chips 
and Chatham Village Croutons on growing a business. 
Thursday, April 7th at 9:30 a.m. in lecture hall A. Coffee 
and refreshments served at 9:00 The college commu- 
nity and general public are welcome to attend. 



Senate needs temporary appointees 



The Student Senate is seeking students for 
temporary appointment to the positions of 
Recording Secretary and Corresponding 
Secretary. 

Appointees will serve until at least the end 



of the semester and possibly until October, 
1994. 

All interested students should contact the 
Student Senate or Cheryl Macedo at the Stu- 
dent Activities Office for more information. 



Senate establishes Council of Presidents 



Under the new Student Senate Bylaws, the 
Senate will be establishing a Council of 
Presidents. This council will be comprised 
of the presidents of all recognized student 
clubs and organizations. 

The purpose of the council will be to main- 
tain an ongoing communication among all 
clubs and organizations, as well as to ap- 
prise the Student Senate of issues and events 
involving or pertaining to any student clubs 



or organizations. 

Student Senate president Tom Edvrards 
encourages club leaders to participate in 
this council as a representative of their club 
or organization. 

If you are interested in being a part of this 
council, please leave your name, the name 
of your organization, and a phone number 
with Cheryl Macedo in the Student Activi- 
ties Office. 



Two-Year College Graduates . . . 

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Building plan Continued from page l 



Further complications with the Build- 
ing Plan include its exact location as well as 
storage problems. Scheduling changes could 
possibly include early morning and late af- 
ternoon classes, which have been tradition- 
ally empty. 

As of now the Building Plan still needs 
to go through several other channels before 
final decisions are made by the state. Mr. 
Edwards is making a request to students to 
send in letters to the everyone involved on 



the local level and to the state legislature to 
keep communication about the Plan open 
and moving. Mr. Edwards also stated that 
letters should demand accountability for 
frmds and ideas from the administration. 

The final proposals for the Plan are 
fat from complete. Changes and new pa- 
perwork are being created daily, resulting 
in new confiision. The only conclusion at 
this time is that there is no conclusion. 



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Page 3 MainSheet March 31, 1994 



Editorial 



Student Commentary: 

Children endangered by family bicycle outings 



t>y BOB KOENIG 

li^ampus News Editor 

I am tired of constantly driving past parents who strap 
their kids on the back of their bike vMlt they go out joy 
iding. When parents go bicycling, they should do their 
jabies a favor and don't bring them along. 
Many of the journeys these parents take are on busy RWe 
28 or curvy, narrow Route 6A. These roads are dangerous 
inough for single cyclists, let alone ones with babies on 
heir backs. I even find quieter back roads too risky a place 
o take kids riding. 

Heavy traffic is not the only danger in this practice. 
IVhat happens when these cyclists are riding along a serene 
jack road and their tire suddenly strikes a pothole? What 
muld happen if they skidded on wet leaves? What vrauld 
lappen if the neighbor's Rottweiler charges their bike? 
f/hea hitting a pothole, a cyclist might at worst fall off the 
)ike and scr^je a knee. No big deal, but what might happen 
f they were carrying a child on the back of their bike? Let's 
see— the cyclist hits the pothole, the bike flips over and the 
)aby lands on its head. Helmet or no helmet we're talking 
%rious injury, especially if the child falls face first on a 
Bck or a tree stump. Imagine the injury that a two-year 
lid's arm could suffer after it has skidded and scraped across 
fifteen feet of pavement? Even supposing that barking Rot- 



Helmet or no helmet we're talk- 
ing serious injury, especially if 
the child falls face first on a rock 
or a tree stump. Imagine the 
injury that a two-year old's arm 
could suffer after it has skidded 
and scraped across fifteen feet 
of pavement? 

tweiler means no harm, chances are the rider would be so 
fiightened, that in avoiding the dog, he or she might swerve 
into a car that's not prepared to stop. I can't imagine what 
might happen to a child bicycle passenger then. 

Unfortunately, over the last decade, little inforination 
has been available on injuries that have resulted ftom bi- 
cycle-mounted child seats. However, the California High- 
way Patrol reports that during the period between 1977 
through 1986 there were 2439 bicycle-related injuries to 
children and 24 deaths of children under the age five result- 
ing firom bicycle related accidents in California. In 1977, 



• 17% of those injured were on bicycle-mounted seats; by 
1986 the injuries to child passengers rose to 28%. These 
statistics prove that with the increasing number of adults 
that are riding with kids on the back of the bike, a greater 
number of innocent children that are being seriously hurt. 
A variety of severe head injuries has resulted from 
these accidents, such'as, lacerations, hematomas, contu- 
sions and abrasions. Many injuries involving the legs, 
ankles and feet were also reported. 

According to Jim Fremont, Education Director for the 
Bicycle Federation of America in Washington, DC, child 
bi'cycle seats of any kind are unsafe because they increase 
bicycle instability. Mr. Fremont says, "Bicycles are un- 
stable to begin with, but v/hen you start adding weight, es- 
pecially weight that may shift unpredictably, even a good 
rider will be put to a difficult test." 

I have seen the expression on the faces of some of 
kids on the backs of their parents' bikes, and it is usually 
that of shock or fear. Children are too often the victims of 
accidents, so why then jeopardize their safety even more by 
taking them on a journey to possible injury or death? 

No matter how sUm the odds may be for an accident 
to occur, I can't condone putting a baby in such risk. My 
advice to parents who wish to go for a Sunday spin-hire a 
baby sitter for a couple of hours and leave the kid at home. 



Letters to the Editor 



Placement Test Center an exception to the rule 



To the Editor: 

"Can you please tell me wiiere I can take the Place- 
ment test?" I was beginning to think I was a question asking 
machine. During registration where everybody is running 
around getting stuff done, I found registering at Cape Cod 
Community College for the first time aggravating. It seemed 
I was just going from building to building muttering things 
like, "These people said I needed to go here, and these people 



said I needed to do this." 

The people in the Placement Test Center were excep- 
tions to the rule. The test workers were helpfid, explained 
everything, so I was able to take the test with ease and con- 
fidence. The counselor I had was extremely helpful in pick- 
ing my classes; he seemed to be trying his hardest to help 
me. I know it's the job of the Test Center to help students, 
but it's good to feel as if someone cares about you at the 
college, in a sea of people w4io could care less. 



I remember thinking there has to be a manual or check- 
list for registration; if there is one I could not find it. 

I don't expect the college staff to take me around by 
the hand, but at least they could give the students some di- 
rection. Everyone I encountered seemed too busy to deal 
with me except the Placement Test Center, 



James B. Rogers 



Student senator offers warning on expansion project 



To the Editor: 

I offer concerns in this letter expressed to me by fel- 
low students and some insight of my own pertaining to the 
new $11 million college expansion project. 

The state is offering matching fimds, leaving CCCC to 
Hnancehalfofthis total cost. I believe that President Kraus 
is doing vtliat he feels is best for this fine institution. The 
question is, can the students afford it? 

The new plan calls for campus ADA compliance, up- 
grading to obtain occupancy permits, improve existing pro- 
grams and adding a new building on campus. The said build- 
ing would house, in particular. Allied Health Programs and 
a Center for Educational Technology and Teleconimimica- 
tions. This means an increase in student fees of $8.50 per 
credit hour. In a March 8 memo. Dean Bruce Bell acknowl- 
edged an annual tuition increase of 3%-5% wiiether we ex- 



pand or not, and asked many questions to this plan that still 
remain unanswered. Students face an overall increase in 
tuition and fees of between $10-$ IS per credit hour. The 
HECC has recommended a 2% ca^) on such hikes. Over 
spring break, President Kraus proposed to the Board ofTrust- 
ees a "new technology fee" of $3 per credit hour, and it 
passed by a vote of 7-3. This new fee will now be consid- 
ered as CCCC overall cost in raising existing costs and stay- 
ing within the 2% cap. 

Dot Burrill of the Adult Re-Entry Center quoted sta- 
tistics from the Office of Planning, Research and Develop- 
ment at the March 9 Special College Meeting. She stated 
that 64% of students are female (mostly single parent moth- 
ers), 49% are on financial aid (which is not going up), and 
39% earn less than $10,000 annually Recent talks of in- 
creases in attendance costs have asked if they should be based 
on yUai. students are willing to pay or able to pay. I pro- 



Professor applauds students efforts 



To the editor: 

The President's report went to the board of trustees; they 
voted on March 17 to approve his recommendations. With 
some luck and money, we are on our way to much-needed 
improvements on campus. 

This report turned out to be a very different version from 
that which preceded it. For that revision, we owe enormous 
thanks to two students: Thomas Edwards, President of the 
Student Senate, and Mark Maxim, Student Trustee. These 
students made a very timely trip on March 1 to the 
Chancellor's office in Boston. Had it not been for the "stimu- 
lus" brought back from that visit, we would quite likely be 
looking straight down Rte. 132 at the "KAO" building and 
still guessing about its renovations. Those of us wdio had 
grave concerns about that "option" are very pleased that it is 



no longer a consideration. Many thanks to Mark and Tom 
and to the many other students who took an active interest in 
the content of the President's report. 

BrendaJ. Boleyn, 
Departmentof Natural Sciences 



Letters Policy 

The MainSheet welcomes letters to the editor from 
members of the CCCC community. Letters may 
be dropped off at the MainSheet office in the Up- 
per Commons, or be mailed to the MainSheet, 
Cape Cod Community College, West Barnstable, 
MA. 02668. AH letters must be signed and ac- 
companied by atelephone number. The MainSheet 
reserves the right to edit letters. 



pose, with these statistics in mind, that there is no differ- 
ence. 

Recent memos also state enioUment is down this year 
by as much as 9%. I warn that if costs go up, this trend in 
dropped enrollments will continue. What good is having 
the best campus if this institution of higher education does 
not enroll enough students to keep it gomg? Is this smart 
business, considering the school is looking to take out a 30 
year loan to accomplish this project? We should not be in 
the business of taking out loans for today and leaving 
tomorrow's students to pay. We should be in the business of 
offering affordable education to aU. After all, that is the 
premise in which the community college system was 
founded. I'd hate to see that premise abandoned. 

Joseph A. Gouveia 
Editor's Note: Student Senator 

According to the President Kraus, the Board of Trust- 
ees ammended his Building Plan Proposal as follows: an 
increase of $3 per credit hour and $3 per non-credit hour. 
There will be no increase in tuition as of now, and there is a 
2% cap by the HECC. 




Editorial Staff 

Brian Ford, Nancy Brennan, Amy Paine Gold, Jack 
Higgins, Bob Koenig, Tern Ladd, Darlene Mokiycki, 
Biyan Russell 

Contributors 

Edward Almedia, Julie Biggs, Sue Celli, Earle Collins, 
Mea Costa, Robert Cuirier, Carole Donahue, Debroah 
Etsten, Elizabeth Gouveia, Joseph Gouveia, Jana Jones, 
Sybil Owens, Lori Perry, Michael Torre, Richard Weath- 
ers 

Faculty Advisor 
William Babner 



Page 4 MainSheet March 31, 1994 



Features 



student commentary: 



Water pollution threatens Cape's fragille environment 



by DEBBIE ETSTEN 

Staff writer 

I love walking on the beach in the winter and only 
meeting sea gulls. I Ipve the beach in the summer w*en it's 
full of vacationers and sun-tanning locals. 

The only problem is when the beach is closed due to 
pollution. More and more of our beautiful peninsula is be- 
coming an open cesspool for our various waste products. 
We toss garbage out and expect it to magically disappear. 

Clean, drinkable water is a vital natural resource es- 
sential for human life. Our only source of water on Cape 
Cod is directly underneath our feet. Everything you dump 
into the ground quickly filters down into the aquifer. 

The building boom of the last 20 years has seriously 
endangered our drinking water. Public supply wells draw 
from wide areas called zones of contribution which have 
been increasingly developed. That means everything you 
flush down the toilet within that zone could end up in your 
drinking water. 

Plumes of pollution from specific sites such as old 
landfills, leaking underground gas tanks, or hazardous chemi- 
cal spills can flow with the groundwater towards the wells 
contaminate your water. 



Non-point pollution such as storm water nmoif, boats, 
septic systems, and lawn fertilizers is a grave danger to drink- 



Excess nitrogen is only one of 
the chennicals whicti threaten 
your drinking water. Barnstable, 
the largest town on Cape Cod, 
has five wells closed due to 
contamination by commercial 
and industrial hazardous waste 



ing water. Cape Cod ranks number one among the state wa- 
tersheds most threatened by non-point pollution, says the 
Compact of Cjqw Cod Conservation Trusts. 

Contaminants are measured by parts per million, which 
tells you something about their lethal effects. Nitrogen, for 
example, is the principle nutrient responsible for algae growth 
in marine water and the degradation of water quality. Ex- 



cess nitrogen interferes with the oxygen carrying capacity, 
of hemoglobin. It can cause miscarriages and defects. 

The E.P.A. regulates the amount of nitrogen in watetr 
to about 10 parts per million before it is unsafe to drink. A' 
study by a Buzzards Bay project found the principal sources 
of nitrogen from septic systems 74 percent, lawn and garden 
fertilizers 23 percent, and 3 percent from acid rain and road 
run-off. 

Nitrogen is. just one of the toxic chemicals that you 
could be drinking. Even the most sophisticated Title V sep- 
tic system can't remove nitrogen, phosphorous or hazardous 
waste from its discharge. 

Excess nitrogen is only one of the chemicals v/bich 
threaten your drinking water. Barnstable, the largest town 
on Cape Cod, has five wells closed due to contamination by 
commercial and industrial hazardous waste. Three wells have 
been opened with air-stripping equipment at a cost of about 
a million dollars per well. The Department of Environmen- 
tal Protection has confirmed 22 contaminated sites in 
Barnstable alone. 

Environmental protection is not just for tree hugging 
fanatics.It affects everybody who wants to be able to drink 
a cool, refreshing, tasty glass of water. We must weigh the 
cost of pollution against the needs of development. 



J USt Ask Billy I what to do about your flamboyant lover 




Just Ask Biflyl is a 
new advice col- 
umn written by stu- 
dent Billy Lewos. 
Questions about DearBilfy: 
school, work, rela- 
tionships and lite 
can be adressed to 
Just Ask Billyl c/o 
MainSheet. 



half, try to remember "love someone for wto they, are~not Dear Billy: 
for who you want them to be." 



Dear Billy: 



Plioto by Terri Ladd 



I'm gay, but in the closet. My lover is very out, loud, 
andflamey. I don't like to be around him on campus be- 
cause I'm afraid people will know I'm gay. How should I 
handle this? 



Wake-up and smell the coffee. What you said about 
Nancy K. is appalling. Nancy has said in several interviews 
that she is not infallible and does not want others to per- 
ceive her as this. She and I blame the media. The media is 
the one who came up with this image. And when she didn 't 
live up to their image she was considered a *itch. But aren 't 
we all *itches at one time in our lives? How can you side 
with the dishonest Tonya? She lied constantly on and off 
camera. She stated she was not guilty yet it was only days 
ago that she finally admitted she was not. Lay off Nancy, 
Billy 

No one's perfect, 
K. Banis 



Confiised on Campus Dear K. Banis: 



What does it mean when your dog doesn 't fetch any- 
more? He just lays on his back with a blank look on his 
face. He won't come when I call either- Now his fur is 
falling out, and his whole body is as stiff as a board. There 
is an awful smell coming from the room he's in. Should I 
call a veterinarian? (a pet doctor) 

Love, 
Einstein 



Dear Einstein: 

I could be wrong, but I think perh^s your dog is dead. 
Either that or he's watching Ishtar. I think now that your 
dog has gone beyon4 you should find a new hobby~per- 
haps macrame or basketweaving, but first, please bury him. 
And Einstein, about that theory of relativity (you know, 
E=mc2) I came to the same conclusion w4iile eating a box 
of ho-ho's, dancing the Lambada with my imaginary Mend, 
Earl. 



Dear Confused: 



It's no doubt that your days must be filled with over- 
whelming anxiety. In my opinion, you will never truly feel 
comfortable with anyone else if you can't feel comfortable 
with yourself Speaking from experience, there is no better 
feeling than being yourself If you can't work through this 
on your own, I suggest speaking with a counselor about your 
own internalized feelings of homophobia. As for your other 



I should have known that no matter w^iat I said, a re- 
buttal was inevitable. I am not siding with Tonya, nor am I 
totally against Nancy, and yes, at times we are all consid- 
ered *itchy. At the risk of getting into this again, I'll leave 
you with these two tidbits: first, a lot has happened since 
we last published and second, -wiien you are in the spotlight, 
all of your blemishes show. That is the price we pay for 
stardom~I should know! 



Advertise in the 
MainSheet 



All courses (except #1 above) 
M, W, or F will meet In their 



Final Exam Schedule 



Common Exam Period. 



COURSE 

ENlOl 
EN102 
EB103 
EN103 
UBIOI 
HB106 
DE051 
DE060 
DE061 
MA106 
MA108 



ENGLISH COMP I 
ENGLISH COMP II 
FOUND WRITING 
ORAL COMMUNICATION 
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 
PRIN SOCIOLOGY 
BASIC ARITHMETIC 
ELEH ALGEBRA 
INTER ALGEBRA 
ELEM STATISTICS 
PRECALCULUS 



EXAMINATION DATE 


WED 


MAY 11 


WED 


MAY 11 


WED 


MAY 11 


THR 


MAY 12 


THR 


MAY 12 


FRI 


MAY 13 


MON 


MAY 16 


HON 


MAY 16 


MON 


MAY 16 


MON 


MAY 16 


MON 


MAY 16 











day and 


time 
















CLASS 


TIME 






EXAMINATION DATE 










8:00 


a.m. 






TUE 


MAY 17 










9:00 


a.m. 






WED 


MAY 11 










10:00 


a.m. 






FRI 


MAY 13 


ed as 


follows 




11:00 


a.m. 






TUE 


MAY 17 










12:00 


noon 






- WED 


MAY 11 


EXAMINATION TIME 


1:00 


p.m. 






FRI 


MAY 13 










2:0Q 


p.m. 






WED 


MAY 11 


8:00 


- 


10:00 


a.m 


3:00 


p.m. 






FRI 


MAY 13 


8:00 


- 


10:00 


a.m 


4:00 


p.m. 






TUE 


MAY 17 


8:00 


- 


10:00 


a.m 














10:30 


- 


12:30 


p.ra 


3. ALL courses 


(except #1 


and #2 above) 


Chat meet 


1:00 


- 


3:00 


p.m 


c 


lassrooms as follows: 






1:00 


- 


3:00 


p.m 














1:00 


- 


3:00 


p.m 


8:00 


a.m. 






THR 


MAY 12 


1:00 


- 


3:00 


p.m 


9:30 


a.m. 






MON 


MAY 16 


1:00 


- 


3:00 


p.m 


11:00 


a,m. 






MON 


MAY 16 


1:00 


- 


3:00 


p.m 


12:30 


p.m. 






THR 


MAY 12 


1:00 




3:00 


p.m 


2:00 
3:30 


p.m. 
p.m. 






THR 
MON 


MAY 12 
MAY 16 



that meet MWF, MW, MTWRF, MTWF, MWRF, WF, 
regularly scheduled classrooms on Che following. 



EXAMIHATION TIME 



8 


00 - 


10 


00 a. 


m. 


1 


00 - 


3: 


00 p. 


m. 


8. 


00 - 


10: 


00 a. 


m. 


10- 


30 - 


12:30 p. 


m. 


10 


30 - 


12: 


30 p. 


m. 


10. 


30 - 


12: 


30 p. 


m. 


3: 


30 - 


5: 


30 p. 


m. 


3: 


30 - 


5: 


30 p. 


m. 


3: 


30 - 


5: 


30 p. 


m. 


or R will meet 


in 




8 


:00 - 


10 


:00 a 


.m 


8 


:00 - 


10 


:00 a 


.a 


10 


:30 - 


12 


:30 p 


.m 


10 


:30 - 


12 


:30 p 


.m 


3 


:30 - 


5 


:30 p 


.m 


3 


:30 - 


S 


:30 p 


.m 



Pages MainSheet March 31, 1994 



Features 



Faculty Commentary: 

Professor Lortie predicts the future from the past 



Editor's note: Professor Lortie has been teaching Sociol- 
ogy at the college since 1972 

WelU here we are at the beginning of 1984 and "Big 
Brother" is not giving me direct orders yet. However, I do 
suspect that he is probably lurking in the background shap- 
ing up his vocal chords and rehearsing his good and bad 
speak. Maybe George Orwell meant to write 1994. 

As Ronald Reagan begins his third year in office, I am 
sitting at my desk reflecting upon how quickly the time 
passed since 1974. Will 1994 arrive with the same speed, 
leaving blurred events in its wake? Will the "Evil Empire," 
as President Reagan describes the Soviet Union, continue 
its hegemony over Eastern Europe and parts of Asia, or will 
it cease to exist, destroyed by its own internal contradic- 
tions? I suspect the military-industrial complex would pre- 
fer that 1994 be much like 1984. If not, I would very much 
like what the defense budget arguments will be like ten years 
from now. 

The internal migration from the "frost-belt" to the 
"sun-belt"is continuing in the 
1980's. My two nephews have 
recently graduated from col- 
lege. One from UMASS- 
Amherst, the other from Trin- 
ity College. They both have 
joined the migration heaxiing 
for California. Their parents are 
not thrilled. My brotiier has al- 
ways viewed California's so- - ■ 
cial, and especially, geological 
structure with suspicion. But 

my nephews are young and impervious to such threats. Will 
they still be by 1994? Perhaps they will come to realize that 
living in close proximity to the San Andreas Fault wasn't 
such a good idea after all. 

Oh, speaking of California, I saw Doris Day and Rock 
Hudson on television the other day. She looked terrific, but 
I can't say the same for him. I'd like to see the'both of them 
co-star in another movie. One of my favorite comedies was 



last evening I watched a to- 
tally inane sit-com. The cred- 
its listed a fellow named Tom 
Hanks as one of the "stars" of 
the show.' 



In this film. Rock Hudson plays the part of a hypochondriac 
■vibo, because of a misunderstanding, believes that he has 
only six months to live. Hilarious movie. 

My wife and I have been watching the Winter Olym- 
pics from Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. The television shots of flie 
city have been most c^tivating. It's a beautiful city with a 
great deal of medieval architecture. Perhaps by 1994, my 
finances will permit a lengthy tour of Europe. If so, I defi- 
nitely plan to put Sarajevo on my itinerary. 

My interest in these Winter Olympics have principally 
revolved around the USA hockey team. I doubt if they can 
repeat as gold medalist, but I do want them to be competi- 
tive. My wife much prefers to watch the figure skating. She 
believes that hockey, as a sport, is too violent. But I reminded 
her of how competitive figure skaters can be, and what might 
happen if they ever met in a dark alley. She laughed. Of 
course, I was only kidding. 

My god, this has been a long winter or maybe it only 
seems that way. My father always told me that the older you 
get, the longer the winters. Baseball news in the newspj^r 
does allow me to mentally es- 
, c^)e winter. It has been a har- 
binger of a spring for me . I read 
that the Red Sox made a trade 
the other day. They acquired 
Bill Buckner from the Chicago 
Cubs. He's a tough veteran hit- 
ter who, I believe, will be in- 
strumental in bringing a world 
^^^^^^^^^^^^_ championship to Boston in a 
couple of years. Though, I do 
wish he could field as well- as 
he can hit. 

The newspaper today reported that twenty years ago 
the Beatles arrived in New York for their first appearance on 
the Ed Sullivan Show. Of coiuse, there is again talk of a 
reunion concert of the surviving members. I hear that every 
time there is some kind of anniversary related to the Beatles. 
It will never happen. 

What's going on with television? The programming 




the movie "Send Me No Flowers," in -vMch. they both starred, on the commercial netvrorks is terrible,especially the situa- 

The Computer Doctor 



Professor Leo Lortie 



tion comedies. Back in the 1970's, there were at least a few 
entertaining sit-coms like the Mary Tyler Moore Show and 
the Bob Newhart Show. I hope the 1990's are an improve- 
ment over the 1980 's. Last evening I watched a totally inane 
sit-com. The credits listed a feUow named Tom Hanks as 
one of the "stars" of the show. Both the show and Tom Hanks 
are heading for a quick demise in the entertainment indus- 
try. Watching a colleague of mine perform his Mark Twain 
routine is much more entertaining than most of wiiat ap- 
pears on commercial television. I have an idea for a fUm- 
"Awake in Atlanta," starring William Babner. It's about a 
guy -viho recently lost his wife and his son calls a late-night 
talk show and.. .Oh, I'll describe it some other time. 

Well enough musings for the moment. We are still a 
long way from 1994, but there is one thing I can confidently 
predict will occur in that year— the winter will definitely be 
longer than the one in 1984. 



How CD-ROM works; How to tell which is the A Drive 




Jerry Schmeer is the 
MainSheet's Com- 
puter Doctor. If you 
have questions about 
how computers work, 
adress letters to The 
Computer Doctor, c/o 
the MainSheet. 

Photo by Bryan Russell 
How come CD-ROM can hold a whole encyclo- 
pedia of information on one compact disc - yet it 
taices several discs to hold a music collection - 
say, "The Best of the Doors." 

Good question, ...but a tough one. First of all, we 
have to remember that a CD-ROM was originally designed 
to hold music. Much like you might buy a 60 minute cas- 
sette, initially CD-ROM's were conceived to hold 74 min- 
utes of music. As things progressed, it was found the early 
. CD pressing equipment and CD-ROM players had a hard 
time dealing with the outside five millimeters of the disk, 
about 14 minutes. 

A CD spirals from the inside out. So in practical terms, 
a CD-ROM can hold 60 minutes of music. In computer 
terms, the basic unit of data for a CD-ROM is the logical 
sector. Eacli sector contains 2,352 bytes of storage, but not 
all of this is available to the user. 

There are two modes to record a CD-ROM. In Mode 
1 , a logical sector on a CD-ROM holds 2,048 bytes per sec- 
tor of user data. This mode is used for recording data and 
program information. In Mode 2, a logical sector on a CD- 
ROM holds 2,336 bytes per sector of user data. This mode is 
used for audio and graphic data. The balance of the space is 



used by the system for tasks such as error correcting. 

All CD-ROM play back at a rate of 75 sectors per sec- 
ond. This is a standard. (Yes, now there are 2X, 3X, and 4X 
modes, but this is still the standard) So for a CD recorded in 
Mode 1 the formula for edacity is 2,048 bytes per sector * 
75 sectors * 60 seconds * 60 minutes or 552,969,000 bytes. 
For a CD recorded in Mode 2 the formula for capacity is 
2,336 bytes per sector * 75 sectors * 60 seconds * 60 min- 
utes or 630,720,000 bytes. When you change bytes back 
into megabytes (a megabyte is actually 1 ,048,576 bytes) we 



Top or bottom, left or right it 
has NO bearing on which 
drive is the A DRIVE. 



find a 60 minute CD-ROM holds about 527 megabytes per 
CD. 

From h^ it gets really complicated (I'm ainazed that 
they even work), but the easiest way to think about it is - 
music is recorded in real time; so 5 seconds of silence in 
music terms is worth tens of thousands bits of data - a lot of 
information. That is about as close as I can get to your 
question here. 

Some other interesting fects about CD-ROMS: First 
of all, if your stretched out the information spiral on a CD- 
ROM to a straight line, it would reach about 5 kilometers. 
Unlike a record that spins with Constant Angular Velocity 
(the rotations per minute are always the same - like 33 1/3) 
a CD spins at Constant Linear Velocity. This means that the 
information must always pass over the reading head at the 
same speed. To accomplish this it means the CD drive must 
constantiy adjust its rate of rotation from one track to an- 
other. When it is reading the inside track it runs at speeds of 



about 200 revolutions per minute, by the time it gets to the 
outside track it is spinning at over 500 revolution per minute. 
The bottom of a CD-ROM is made of polycarbonate, 
a very tough plastic used in armored windows and police 
protective shields. That is why this surface is hard to scratch. 
Often the damage to a CD is done to the top where die label 
is, it is covered by just a thin coat of lacquer. The middle 
layer is a thin layer of metal, usually aluminum. As many 
people know a disk is pited with little holes called surpris- 
ingly - PITS. The flat surfaces are call LANDS. Unlike 
•vitiai most people think, each pit and land does not repre- 
sent a and a 1 . Bits are actually represented by the transi- 
tion from one to the other. Once again from here it gets 
very complicated. Those interested in reading more should 
pick up flie book Publish Yourself on CD-ROM by Caffarelli 
& Straughan. 

How do i tell the A DRIVE from the B DRIVE on a 
computer ? 

First of all it is important to remember that the term is 
relative. Top or bottom, left or right it has NO bearing on 
vdiich drive is the A DRIVE. Basically the floppy disk drive 
cable (inside the machine) has an A connector and a B con- 
nector. What ever drive was hooked up to the A connector 
is the A DRIVE, and wtot ever drive is hooked up to the B 
connector is the B DRIVE. So the question still comes up, 
HOW DO IKNOW WITHOUT OPENING THE MACHINE 
WHICH DRIVE IS WHICH ? Easy. If there is one drive - it 
is the A DRIVE. If there are two drives, turn the machine 
off, then turn it back on. When the machine boots up it 
always does a self check. In that self check you'll see first 
one drive ligiht come on, then the other. The drive that the 
bght comes on first is the A DRIVE, the ottier is the B 
DRIVE. 



!| 



Page 6 MainSheet March 31, 1994 



Entertainment 



Rock n' Roll Hall of Famer performs at Christines 




R!ck Danko of The Band 



CD Review 



by JACK HIGGINS 

Entertainment Editor 

Now wouldn't you like to spend a Friday evening be- 
ing entertained by a Rock n' 
Roll hall of fame inductee? Re- ' 
cently a few hundred fans of 
Rick Danko, he of THE BAND, 
were just that lucky. 

Danko reached his heyday 
in the late 60's and early 70's 
while with The Band, which also 
included Robbie Robertson, ' 
Levon Helm, Garth Hudson, 
and the late Richard Manuel. 

At the recent Rock n' RoU Hall of Fame induction cer- 
emony, Eric Cl^ton finally got his chance to play with The 
photo by Jack Higgiiu Band. He went on to explain, "I went to Woodstock and just 



hung out backstage in hopes of being asked to play with The 
Band." Clapton also said, "the album Music From Big Pink 
was the most influential element in my song writing style." 
At Christines Danko played some new things that The 
Band has recently recorded, j 
as well as a good portion of 1 
the old standards that brought 
him to the echelon of The 
Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame. 

Danko played the show 
at Christines while on break 

from the current Band totir. 

He used this opportunity to 
play an all acoustic set (he 
plays bass while with The BancQ, accompanied by a lone 
harmonica player. 

It was a beautifid show right down to the closing song, 
"I Shall Be Released." 



■| went to Woodstock and just 
hung out backstage in hopes of 
being asked to play with The 
Band' -Eric Clapton 



Soundgarden: "Super Unknown" 



by SUECEUI 

Staff Writer 

Chris Cornell and company's new felease is called Su- 
per Unknown. It's available on compact disc, cassette tape, 
or record album. That's right, vinyl, this seems to be the 
latest trend among Seattle bands such as Alice In Chains 
and Pearl Jam. Super Unknown was available in limited edi- 
tion album form before it was released on c.d. or tape. But 
no matter v/hat audio form you choose, it's what's on the 
inside that really counts, so let's talk about the content. 

You can't go wrong with Chris Cornell's extraordinar- 
ily powerful voice and Kim Thayil's te"riff "ic guitar play- 
ing. Cornell's vocal diversity is wonderfully demonstrated 
in songs like, "Black Hole Sun" and "Mailman". 

The album as a wliole has a dark, desolate feel to it, 
but that's what Soundgarden is about. A splash of blues, a 



bit of psychadelia, and just a hint of the Beatles (in "Black 
Hole Sun") are aU thrown into a pit of despair that makes 
for an intense hstening experience. Let's not forget drum- 
mer Matt Cameron and bassist Ben Sheperd. They play an 
important role in providing the foimdation for songs such as 
"Let Me Drown" and "Half". 

Soundgarden is finally getting the recognition it de- 
serves. Super Unknown's first release "Spoormian" is get- 
ting qtiite a bit of video and air play. This song is a little 
reminiscent of Nirvana's "Rape Me" in certain parts, I think. 

This recording as a whole is terrific, but it's depress- 
ing tones never seem to let up, so I'm giving it 4 and a half 
out of 5 stars. Super Unknown should definitely be on the 
"must have" list of anyone -who wants to hear hard hitting, 
ground moving, body shaking, and all around aurally excit- 
ing music. 




CCCC student Senate 
presents 



Peter Wolf 



and 



The Houseparty 5 
Saturday, April 23, 1 994 

CCCC Field House 

Tickets $10.00 



rickets available at the Student Activities Office in the 
Upper Commons 



Movie Revievy^: 



AIDS on the big screen: 

Philadelphia confronts discrimination 



by Sybil Owens 

Staff Writer 

In the movie Philadelphia, Tom Hanks 
gives a powerful performance as Andrew 
Beckett, a lawyer who accuses his former law 
firm of firing him because he has AIDS. 

Andrew keeps his homosexuality and his 
HIV status hidden from his colleagues. Just 
as bis health begins to deteriorate, he is pro- 
moted to senior associ- 
ate and handed a major 
case. The next thing he 
knows he is fired for in- 
competence. It turns out 
one of the partners had 
noticed a lesion on his 

forehead. The movie 

suggests that AIDS is 

such a fearful disease 

that a simple lesion is enough to create panic 

in the workplace. 

Andrew ^nfers with nine lawyers before 
consulting Joe Miller (Denzel Washington) 
apersonal injury attorney and self confessed 
homophobe. They shake hands. "I have 
AIDS," Andrew says. Something in Joe 
freezes, he drops his hand and slowly, with- 
out stopping the conversation, inches back- 
wards as if a cobra was about to strike him. 
Even though we know Joe will have a 
change of heart, Washington, cocky and de- 
fensive, gives a thoroughly honest portrayal 
of a prejudiced man wrestling with his fears. 
He jokes with his wife and says, "Fine, I ad- 
mit I have a problem with Gays," as he turns 



or complete. Although he doesn't end up 
embracing homosexuality, he does begin to 
see it from a different angle. Only small 
gestures convey the ethical distance he has 
really traveled. 

Philadelphia is not about a disease, but a 
climate of'intolerance that turns a disease 
into a stigma. No one states it better than 
Joe: "Let s face it," he aimounces to the court, 
this case is really' about the loathing... the 

fear and hatred of 

homosexuality." 

The movie's 
most climactic and 
intense scene hap- 
pens unexpectedly 
at the end of a 
party. Joe has 
stayed to go over 
some legal ques- 



'As Andrew' s health 
deteriorates, we are 
able to see life through 
his eyes' 



tions with Andrew, who is too distracted by 
his music, a Maria Callas aria from Andrea 
Chenier. He gets up and wiieels his I.V 
bottle around the floor as if it were his danc- 
ing partner. 

He tries to explain to Joe vibat the song 
means. "It was during that sorrow that love 
came to me, " Callas sings. Ibm it aroimd 
and you have the story of AIDS. Joe sits still 
and stares vMle Andrew spins slowly round 
and round. The camera becomes perched up 
above Hank s shoulder, looking down at his 
head from an uncomfortable angle. Joe can 
do anything for his client except understand 
him or so we believe. 
However, w4ien Joe says goodbye and goes 
and does a gay impression in the doorway of home, we stay with him as he looks in on his 

their kitchen. ^ . ^ „ t « 

Contmuea on Back Page 



Joe's transformation is never obvious 



rage / iviainsneet March 31, 1994 



Campus Life 



Yom Hashoa will be observed at CCCC 

Ceremony commemorating Holocaust will include work by college arts community 



by DARIENE MOKRYCKI 

Staff Writer 

The Holocaust happened over fifty years ago. Through 
the years the survivors of this 
horrific event have helped to 
preserve its lessons through re- 
counting their personal recol- 
lections. In order to commune 
with all those '»^o suffered at 
NazLhands, Yom Hashoa was 
created as an annual, national 
civic commemoration of the 
Holocaust. Days of Remem- 
brance observances will be 
held across the country during 
this particular week. 

CCCC will host this area's 
remembrance at 3 P.M. on Sun- 
day April 10, 1994, in the 
Tilden Arts Center theater. 
This year's theme will be "Re- * - 
membering Children." 

Featured in the remembrance will be an interpretive 
dance piece directed by Joanne Callum, selections by the 
CCCC Chorus which wUl be directed by Dr. Robert Kidd, a 
short exerpt froni the play "Anne Frank", directed by P.J. 



Through the years the survivors 
of this horrific event hove 
helped to preserve its lessons 
through recounting their per- 
sonal recollections. In order to 
commune with all those who 
suffered at Nazi hands, Yom 
Hashoa was created as an an- 
nual, national civic commemo- 
ration of the Holocaust 



McKay. A slide presentation will be shown by Sara 
Ringler depicting photogr^hs of works done by 
her students. On display throughout the Arts Build- 
ing will be student works from Sara Ringler's Draw- 
ing I class, which 
y/ete created by her 
students in keeping 
with the theme of " 
The forest as a silent 
witness." Works 
from Lisa Franklin's 
Creative Writing 
class will be exhib- 
ited also. 

Cantor Bruce 
Malin from the 
Cape Cod Syna- 
gogue will partici- 
pate in the remem- 
brance, along with 
. the children's choir. 
There will be a 
candle lighting cer- 
emony by survivors, children of survivors and lib- 
erators. 

All are welcome and encouraged to attend 
the observance. jtudent artwork 

created to com- 
memorate the Ho- 
locaust. Created 
by (I.) Mynnde 
Russell and (r.) An- 
drew McManus. 









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Free Pregnancy Testing 

Non-Judgemental 

Guidance 

Support Groups 




298 Main Street, Hyannis 

800-439-1172 

771-1102 



When you finish your 
Associate's Degree. . . 



FAST 



While earning an associate's degree at Cape Cod 
Community College, you can use "ARTSYS" \o fast forward 
toward your next goal: a bachelor's degree at Bridgewater State 
College. ARTSYS is a computer soltware program that's l>een 
specially developed to help students at Cape Cod Cotiununity 
College match up their current academic program with those 
available at BSC. . 



FORWARD 

Fmd out instantly which courses available to you at Cape 
Cod are applicable to degree programs at Bridgewater. 
Planning your course of studies at Cape Cod Conununity 
Collsge is made so much easier — no catalogs to compare, no 
guesswork on your part at all. 

For more information on ARTSYS and how you can 
access its resources, stop by and visit Francis Doherty at your 
counseling center or call Bridgewater State College at 
1-800-698-2006. 



And put your future on FAST FORWARD. 



Bridgew 

Bridgewater State College 




MainSheet March 31, 1994 






Back Page 



Student Survey: 

Who controls the clicker to your T.V.? 



Photos by Debbie Etsten 







.^^c?^^ 




Todd Anderson/Mashpee 
Physical Therapy Assistant 

It's mine, it's a control thing. 



Kelley LaPuc/Falmouth 
Business Management 

My father controls the clicker 
because sports is number one in 
his life. 



Francis M. Elcqoa/Centerville 

Science 

It all depends who gets their 

bands on it first 



Kim Disney/Falmouth 
Liberal Arts 

My brother-in-law controls the 
clicker because he hates Barney. 



Jerry Stanley/Hyannis 
Liberal Arts 

I pay more of the rent and that 
gives me the auAoiity to get the 
clicker. 



! 



Alternatives do exist to commuting alone 



by MIKE TORRE 
Staff Writer 

Would you like to cut your transportation costs? Are you 
one of the many CCCC students without a car? Students 
experiencing transportation woes may find some valuable 
help at the Student Activities Office (SAO). 

The SAO offers information on car pooling and on the 
buses coming regularly to the campus. They also encourage 
anyone with ideas or information on alternative modes of 
transportation to get in touch with them. 

The Car Pool Information Program (CPIP) is designed to 
match car owners and drivers with students who need rides. 

Philadelphia 

child and Ues down next to his wife ans holds 
her tightly. Maria Callas is still heard sing- 
ing in the background and there is a look of 
haunting devastation in his eyes. 

Director Jonathan Demme uses insight- 
ful close-ups ; the camera focuses on the hu- 
man face as if that is aU that truly matters. 
As Andrew's health deteriorates we are able 
to see life through his eyes. The camera darts 
back and forth to the jurors, the witness, the 



Students can check the CPIP loose-leaf notebook at the SAO 
office to find out who needs riders or rides. 

Jason, an Art and Humanities major who drives nearly 1 20 
miles a day to and fi'om school said, "It gives you someone 
to talk to. Not to mention some badly needed gas money." 

The Sea Line Bus runs between Woods Hole and CCCC. 
Passengers may catch the bus on Mondays through Satur- 
days at any one of the 19 stops along or near Route 28. 

Sea Line offers discount commuter rates for frequent 
users, the elderly, and the handicapped. All buses come 
equipped with wheelchair lifts. 

Plymouth and Brockton bus Une has services from its 



terminal at Plymouth Industrial Park and Sagamore Circle to 
the Burger KingoffRoute6near the campus. They also have 
a bus from Provincetown to Barnstable which can usually be 
waved down anywhere along its run on route 6 A. For more 
information on Plymouth and Brockton's services call 508- 
746-0378. 

Finally, the b-bus runs a door to door service, by appoint- 
ment only, from Chatham and Oleans. This can only be 
done by calling 1-800-352-7155 between 1-4 p.m. on week- 
days and em-olling as a new subscriber. Once enrolled the b- 
bus dispatcher will explain the scheduling system. 



Continued from page 6 

attorneys, creating a whirlwind of images. 

Mary Steenburgen as the firm's aggres- 
sive attorney and Jason Robards as the firm's 
head honcho are predictable characters, but 
eflfective. However, flie courageous portrayal 
by Tom Hanks and the charismatic perfor- 
mance by Denzel Washington is what makes 
this movie get you and keep you. 

It would be hard to imagine a person 
walking away from Philadelphia unmoved. 



CALLING ALL ARTISANS 

Tilden Arts Festival 

Saturday, May 7, 1994, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
To reserve a free table, contact Bob McDonald of 
362-2 1 3 1 , ext. 41 7, or Sara Ringlet at exi. 355. Tables 
will be given on a first come first serve basis, so 

make your reservations earlyl 



Craigville Pizza & 
Me^can 



The/IE^ Ec I The Place For "After" 




521 Main Street 

Hyannis, MA 02601 

(508)771-1596 



•School aThe Prom 

•Dates ^The Beach 

•Homework •Movies 

•The MaU •Hanging Out 
•Work 



7 Days A Week • 11 p.m. At Night TU 1 in The Afternoon 




$i.oooff ^ . 

any large pizza m^th this coupon 

4 Barlows Landing Rd. Pocasset 564-6306 
6M CraigviUe Beach Rd. W. Byanniq>art7754M7 



FREE ESTIMATES 

FREE PICKUP AND DELIVERY 



HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 
BOATS, CARS, ANTIQUES 




CAPE COD UPHOLSTERY 



DAVID R. CLARK 

508-548-8741 



U CHILDS RIVER ROAD 
E. FALMOUTH, MA 02536 



Get Acquainted with us 

Before You Get Acquainted 

with Each Other 

Free Pregnancy Testing 

Gynecology 

Pregnancy Termination 

Birth Control 

A private practice devoted to reproductive medicine. 

Because witli some matters it's privacy that counts. 

Reasonable Fees - Evening Hours - Visa & Mastercard 

IWomanCare 



Hyannis Office 
62-68 Camp Street 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

778-6700 



New Bedford Office 

12 Brigham Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

999-5757 



Aprin4, 1?94 iii^^oTZ^IITxVir^ Cape Cod Communify College, West Barnstable, MA Distributed FREE 




Ceremony of remembrance Heinz Praeger participates In the candle- 
lighting ceremony at Yom Hashoah. Story, pictures, page 8. ..._.- 



photo by Tarrf Lmdd 



Students exchange community service for food 

\dult Re-entry Center administrates campus SHARE chapter 



Jiy MIKE TORRE 

jjfaff Writer 

The Adult Re-Entry Center's Hunger on Campus Pilot 
iProject has a new program to run along with its Food Pan- 
jiry. The Self Help and Resource Exchange (SHARE) pro- 
gram registered the first campus participants April 4th and 
ISth. 

Participants receive a food package worth $30 in ex- 
!change for two hours of volunteer service and $13 in cash or 
food stamps. There is no limit to how many packages an 
individual may purchase. 

SHARE Committee Chairperson, Kathryn Somma, sees 
the program working hand in hand with the Food Pantry. "It 



solves part of the problem people come to the food pantry 
for," says Ms. Somma. 

Once someone registers and pays their $13, they will 
receive a receipt with a specified date (approximately two 
weeks after issued) to pick up their food at the college caf- 
eteria. 

Students may register for the program at the beginning 
of each month in the school cafeteria or any time during the 
week at the Adult Re-Entry Center (ARC) office. The ARC 
office is located on the second floor of the Commons build- 
ing. 

If someone is interested in signing up or needs infor- 

Continued on page 2 



Woman calls him 'dirty Nazi pig ' 

Cabaret actor gets spat on after opening night 



By LORI PERRY 

Staff Writer 

The audience gave more than just applause after the open- 
ing night performance of the college's rendition of Cabaret. 
An older woman with a German accent spat on actor John W. 
Edwards calling him a "Dirty Nazi pig." Edwards plays Ernest 
Ludwig, a nazi character in Cabaret. "At first the audience 
falls in love with the friendly, fim-loving German, then when 
they realize he 's a Nazi— they hate him," said Edwards. 

After the Saturday night show, a man from the audience 
asked him^how can you look at yourself in the mirror?" 

"In the begiiming of the play he (Ernest Ludwig) seems 
pretty cool, but toward the end he turns into a jerk," said 
Michael Dodge an audience member who enjoyed the show. 

The play takes place in 1929-30 in a German cabaret called 
the Kit Kat. The stage is set like an actual club with a band, 
dancers, singers, and a bar. The audience members sit at 
cocktail tables complete with beer and pretzels served by 
cast waiters. 

Perhaps it is this hfe-like setting that caused a few in the 
audience to have trouble distinguishing between real-life 
and make-believe. As a result, Mr. Edwards has dealt with 



pushing, shoving, name caUing, and spitting. 

To play this character, he has done "a lot of research and 
soul searching." 

Another cast member said, "I'm sorry that he was spat upon, 
but it just proves that he was doing his job as an actor." 

P.J. McKey, the director of the play, comments on Mr. 
Edwards and his character. "It's hard to play such an unlik- 
able character.He had to get past the 1994 perspective of a 
Nazi and realize that in 1930 Ernest Ludwig might not be 
such a bad guy," said Ms. McKey. 

According' to Carol Call, the Secretary to the Fine and 
Performing Arts and Box Office fill-in, the success of the 
play could be measured by the lack of empty seats. You 
needed to buy tickets in advance because all the shows sold 
out. 

Prop manager Tricia Sweeney said, "The director had a 
vision and came through with it . , . and the audience seemed 
overwhelmed." "We got a good gasp out of them," added Ms. 
McKey. 

Mr. Edwards is an Air National Guardsman at Otis, a music 
major at CCCC, and plans to graduate this May. He has also 
been in The Old Maid and the Thief, and Mikado. 



Ethnic Diversity 
Club promotes 
understanding 
on campus 

by EARLE COLLINS 

Staff Writer 

Recent comments made on campus about the Ethnic Di- 
versity Club prove that racial tensions exist at CCCC. These 
conmients question how diverse the club is. 

The comments were originally raised in the Student Sen- 
ate but are prevalent throughout the campus. When asked, 
many students said they thought the club was for black stu- 
dents only. 

Members of the club see no reason for this view of the 
club. In a Senate meeting. Diversity Club President Paula 
Howell said, "The club preaches, teaches, and practices cul- 
tural diversity, not necessarily pigment diversity." 

Ms. Howell said the club has members representing 
Trinida4 Italy, Panama, Korea and Africa. "These people 
may be black in color, it does not negate the diversity in 
cultures," she added. 

Skye Carlson-Greene, a club member, said there could be 
mafny reasons the club is misimderstood. The posters the 
club used to promote African- American History month in 
February were in black and white. Those colors were cho- 
sen because they were the least expensive. A person who 
did not know that could read into the colors a wrong mes- 
sage. 

On possible activities planned by the club Ms. Carlson- 
Greene said, "If we bring in a speaker on Latin American 
issues and he happens to be black, does that make it a black 
issue or an issue on politics?" 

Club member Aljamien Islam admits most club members 
are black but it is not intentional. He does think that the 
number of black members is not something that needs de- 
fending. "We have to be a force to change the misconcep- 
tions of blacks." 

He cites a strong and nearly constant uneasiness of some 
black students on campus. He said one student almost got 
into a fight with a group of white students after they laughed 
as he walked by. 

The student realized that the laughter was not aimed at 
him and walked away. Islam said this event might seem 
trivial to some, but the possibility that these acts are inten- 
tional is a huge distraction from studies. 

Anotiier CCCC student, wlio asked not to be identified 
can understand this situation. Regarding an incident off- 
campus, he said, "One night I was jumped by three or four 
people. For about five minutes they were hitting and kick- 
ing me y/bUe I was onthe ground." 

Continued on Back Page 



biside: 


' 


Campus News 

Conunencement Scholarships offered 


Pg.2 


Features 

Cape organization saves the \<*ales 


Pg.7 


Entertainment 

Schindler's List reviewed 


Pg.6 


Fall schedule 


Pg. 11 



\\ 



Page 2 MalnSheet Aprt1 14, 1994 



Campus News 



Commencement Scholarships to be awarded 



BY LORI PERRY 

StaffWriter 

Roughly 30 Commencement Scholarships are offered each 
year to CCCC students to further their education at other 
colleges. The scholarships range from $500 to about $ 1 000, 
and sometimes cover the entire cost of tuition. 

To be eligible for the scholarships students must have 
graduated in August or December of 1993, or applied for 
graduation this year. The Financial Aid Office mailed the 
applications to the students on April 1. 

If a student qualifies for a scholarship and does not receive 
an application by April 15 they will be available in the Fi- 
nancial Aid Office. The deadline for all applications is April 



20. 

According to Michael Cuff, Director of Fmancial Aid, the 
money comes from a variety of soiffces including the Educa- 
tional Foundation, donations from foculty and staff mem- 
bers, civic organizations, and some colleges. 

A scholarship committee of faculty, administrative staff, 
and fmancial aid representatives will review the applica- 
tions along with a CCCC transcript. The committee will 
base their decisions primarily on academics, including chal- 
lenging course levels and extracurricular activities. 

The financial aid office will notify students of awards by 
the first or second week in May. 



Employment interviews scheduled for campus 



by JULIE BIGGS 

StaffWriter 

Graduating business students will now have an oppor- 
tunity on campus to be interviewed by potential employers. 
Companies that will be on campus to interview students in- 
clude: State Chemical Company, CVS. Corporation, Daniel 
Webster Inn, The Prudential, Pilgrim Health Care, and mOTe. 
These companies offer employment opportunities both on 
and off the Cape. 

Theresa Bowse, Career Specialist, feels that these in- 
terviews are helpiid to graduating students seeking employ- 
ment. "Students can get their foot in the door," said Ms. 
Bowse. 

Interested students will need to prepare and submit 
five copies of their resume, which will be distributed to the 
participating employers of their choice. The resiunes will 
be forwarded to the companies for pre-screening one week 
prior to the interview date. 



Companies will screen all resumes and infonn the 
career specialist \(4uch students they have selected to inter- 
view. Ms. Bowse will then inform the students whether or 
not they have been selected for an interview. Students -w^io 
are selected wiU be responsible to schedide an interview 
through Ms. Bowse. Information about participating com- 
panies will be available beforehand. 

The first interview date is scheduled for April 26, and 
the dates that follow will run through early May. Different 
companies will interview on different days. 

Other non-business majors are welcome to participate; 
job opportunities wiU most likely be business oriented. 1993 
CCCC graduates are also eligible to participate. 

"It's a first year initiative, we think it will grow as th6 
years go on," said program director Carol Dubay. 

Students who are interested should contact Theresa 
Bowse at 362-2131, ext. 374, or stop by her office, Rm. 
220B, of the South Building. 



Global pledge grabs national attention 



ByJANA JONES 

StaffWriter 

"I pledge my allegiance to the planet Earth to make it 
better, healthier and a safe world for all!" 

This global pledge has been recognized by President 
Clinton, former Governor Michael Dukakis, and several mem- 
bers of Congress including Congressman Gerry Studds. 

The author Jerry Schmeer, a computer technician at CCCC, 
has devoted hlmselfto our environment since 1988. He said 
that 'Tatriotic acts can come from this pledge. The response 
to the Global Pledge can imite hearts and souls of us as indi- 
viduals." 

In 1989, Mr. Schmeer conceived the idea for the GIol,<J 

SHARE continued from page 1 

mation they can stop by the ARC office or call 508-362- 
.8857. SHARE currently has six active committee members 
on campus available if you need assistance. They are Kattiryn 
Somma, Sean Woodley, Linda Whitworth, Dawn King, Ken 
Williams, and Barbara Boulanger. 

Ms. Somma said the SHARE'S program is for anyone 
A\iio wishes to save money, and stretch their food budget. 

"We are always looking for volunteers," said Ms. 
Sonuna, "it's a great way to get involved with the conrniu- 
nity, and to become a part of an experience w*ose ultimate 
goal is people helping people." 

March's food packages consisted of a 2 1/2 lb. turkey 
ham, meatballs, chicken kiev, ground turkey, oat bran ce- 
real, broccoli, bananas, grapefruits, potatoes, onions, car- 
rots, pancake mix, apples, ten bean soup and bartlett pears. 
Every package contains from six to 11 pounds of meat. 

The food purchased by SHARE comes from growers, 
brokers, and packaging plants. The food is never donated, 
nor is it government surplus or salvage food. 

SHARE began in 1983, in San Diego, California and 
first arrived on C^)e Cod in the spring of 1991 at the First 
B^tist Church in Hyannis. By February of 1994 the num- 
ber of sites on the C^>e had expanded to 15 ranging from 
Provincetown to Sagamore. The site at CCCC will be the 
16th. 

Dot Burrill, Director of the ARC, said the need for 
such programs is greater than ever. "More Americans are 
now on Food Stamps than ever before," said Ms. Burrill. 
"One in ten are now using food pantries." 



Pledge. He stated "Since our children pledge allegiance to 
their countries, wouldn't it be nice if they pledged allegiance 
to their earth instead of their individual nations?" 

Mr. Schmeer has received several letters of praise from 
teachers both American and foreign. Mr. Schmeer is cur- 
rently delivering his message about the planet to students in 
England. Students from several of the local schools have 
also had the opportunity of listening to Mr. Schmeer speak 
about the environment 

April 22 is Earth Day and Mr. Shmeer hopes to have his 
pledge heard throughout the worid. 



NEWS BRIEFS 






Health Fair '94 

Health Fair '94 is being held Saturday, April 30 from V 
a.m. till 2 p.m. in the CCCC Student Commons. The fai 
will provide information about ilhiess prevention tech 
niques signs to recognize diseases. The foir is run b 
graduating nursing students directed by Luise Speakman 
chairperson ofthe CCCC nursing program. Admission i 
free and the public is invited. 

Program for caregivers offered 

The Center for Successfid Aging is qmnsoring a prograi) 
for caregivers on Thursday, April 2 1 from 4 to 6p.m . Lii 
Hood-Glidden, a holistic psychotherapist will discuss hov 
to deal with the stress of caring for a loved one. Reserva 
tions can be made by sending a $5 check to The Cente 
for Successfiil Aging at (XCC . 

Brown Bag Features assistance dogs 

On Thursday, April 2 1 , the Brown Bag lunch vsill featur 
incites from "assistance dog" users. Speakers will in 
elude Don Meade with his dog Casey and Larry Getmaj { 
with his dog Ukee. The presentation will run from 12;3 
p.m. till 1:30p.m. and will focus on the selecting anu 
training of these animals. 

Family Planning volunteers needed 

Falmouth Family Planning needs volunteers to provid- 
pregnancy testing and family cotmseling. Volunteers d 
not need any experience. Training sessions begin Men 
day, April 18. People interested in volunteering shoul 
contact Joanie Barrows at 540-8167. 

Red Cross Blood Drive 

The Red Cross will be holding a blood drive April 2 
from 12to5p.m. inthegynmasium. Signups will bi 
held during the week of April 13 in the cafeteria. Inldt. 
ested students can contact Hope Baitd at the Student So?: 
ate office or at Ext. 399. 



CLASSFDED 

Baltimore school teacher wants room to rei 
for July and August, Mid-Cape area, while employe 
forsummet Call Charlene, (410)931-8024. i 




Making College 
a Reality for 
BusyAdults 

You won't have to move to Saratoga 
Springs to earn a degree from a distin- 
' guished private college. We are a national pioneer 
in teaching adults in their own communities. We're small, we're 
affordable, and we design educations one person at a time. 
Talk to us about studies in the liberal arts, business, 
and the studio and performing arts. 



SKIDMORE 





For information, call 
518-584-5000x22d5 
SKIDMORE COLLEGE 

Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 




Editorial 



Page 3 MainSheet April 14, 1994 



Letters to the Editor 



Professor says hots off in her class 



To the Editor 

It would be very much appreciated if you would publish 
my response to the Letter To the Editor written by 
Jonathan Mayo, published in the February 24, 1994 issue 
of the MAINSHEET 

Yes, at the beginning of each semester I announce 
that I "expect" my students (male and female) to remove 
inappropriate hats (and in particular basebaU hats). I 
adhere to the societal standard that considers wearing hats 
indoors inappropriate dress. It falls under the category of 
proper etiquette. Although I recognize a student's right to 
"freedom of choice", the student must realize that he/she 
also has the "freedom of choice" not to take the class if 
he/she does not choose to adhere to a faculty member's 
guidelines. Sometimes, as members of society we must 
balance free expression with respect for standards of ci- 
vility and courtesy, and respect for the rights and dignity 
of others. 

The major point that I would like to make in re- 
gards to the "hat" letter is that I concur with statements 
made by Dr. Ernest Boyer, President of the Carnegie Foun- 
dation for the Advancement of Teaching, in the recently 
published Special Report to the American Council on 
Education. In the Special Report, entitled CAMPUS LIFE 
IN SEARCH OF COMMUNITY, Dr. Boyer asserts that 
the college student of the 1990's has few role models and 
is "confiised as to ^propriate behaviors." Although I "cel- 
ebrate diversity" and individuality, I deplore rudeness. 
It is my honest belief that I and the Cape Cod Commu- 
nity College faculty and staff have responsibilities that 
extend beyond the classroom. I believe that we should be 



role models for social, moral, and civic responsibilities. 
As an educator, and in particular a health educator, I have 
a responsibility to educate the whole person - body, mind, 
and spirit. We as professionals in a community of learn- 
ing must make a connection between w^iat our students 
learn on this campus and how they live as members of a 
larger community to vMch are accountable as respon- 
sible citizens. And therefore, making a request at the 
beginning of the semester to not wear hats to class has a 
lot to do with my students "achieving their goals," and 
becoming more responsible adults. 

According to Dr. Boyer, because this generation of 
children lacks role models for ^ipropriate etiquette, we 
have a generation of too many young people who are 
selfish, rude, and undisciplined. Many parents of the 
1970's wanted "happy, carefree, uncomplicated, and cre- 
ative children" but in fact fostered a generation of young 
people ^^o "use abusive language, are increasing illicit 
drug use, and some have deep rooted prejudices." What 
is frightening to me is that in many incidents these stu- 
dents do not know ^\^at is offensive and rude behavior. 

Etiquette can be defined as a "code of social be- 
havior." We all must learn the socially acceptable ways 
of living with others, in whatever society we Uve. We 
have these rules so that we all may mutually benefit and 
be comfortable even though our particular circumstances 
may be different. Since I believe that wearing a hat in- 
doors is improper etiquette I will continue to expect my 
students to respect that custom wUle in my classes. 

Professor Barbara Fitzpatrick 



lommunity College open-door policy provides unique opportunities 



)ear Editor: 

Since I came to America from Japan where I was bom 
nd lived for 20 years, I think I have an insight into the 
ducational systems of the two countries. One striking dif- 
erence is the way Japanese imiversities/coUeges admit stu- 
lents compared to the way American colleges do. 

When I knocked on the door of Cape Cod Community 
'oUege, it was not difficult to open. Since I started attend- 
iig class, I have realized that it Avas not difficult for the 
ither people, either. 

In Japan, many students who were not in the top of 
beir high school class and who could not pass an entrance 
xam (given once a year) would not be allowed to go to 
oUege, unless the student were willing to compromise by 
ttend a less than first rate school. 

American students do not realize how fortunate they 
re that many American schools have an almost total "open 



door" policy. Japanese students would appreciate this sec- 
ond chance, open door policy in the United States. The 
restrictions placed on Japanese students discourage many 
possible applicants from attending schools. 

I left CCCC three semesters ago with an associate de- 
gree. Over the last year, I decided I wanted to go back to 
school to start to study nursing. CCCC has welcomed me 
gladly. Because, in Js^anese schools, the students tend to 
stay in certain age ranges, 18-22, 1 do not think I would 
even try to go back to school there. 

I hope Japanese schools start to learn the importance 
and necessity of the "open door" policy. 

I want students here to know wtat a great opportunity 
they have available, and appreciate that there is always a 
door to knock upon. 

Sincerely yours, 
YukiOno 



Feminine protection need not damage ttie environment 



fe The Editor: 

' This Earth Day, women students at CCCC might think 

ibout oiu" role as stewards or leaders-of-conscience in 

irotecting this sacred temple of human evolution we 

iall Mother Earth in a profoundly practical way. The 

iverage woman produces nearly six hundred pounds of 

througihout her lifetime menstrual cycle. Who 

lally wants to be an average woman? 

Many people do not realize there are alternatives to 

disposable pads and stoppers whose sale crams TV 

lercial time. These alternatives include 100 per- 

nt cotton non-disposable pads and panty-liners and 

terile, safe natural sea sponges. 

ligned, 
Deborah Ullman 



For more information on either of these products contact 
your local natural foods store, or either of these two dis- 
tributors. Here are their phone numbers and addresses: 

Modem Woman's Choice 
PO Box 245, Gabriola, BC 
Canada VOR 1X0 
Phone: (604) 247-8433 

Counter Culture 
PO Box 1106 
Hawthorne, FL 32640 
Phone: (904) 684-3217 



Classrooms lacking creative toucti 

Dear Editor: 

Hard dirty floors, white brick walls, blue doors. Desks 
with writing all over them, the same gray, scratched dirty 
floors, a clock, and a bulletin board. Can our schools get 
any more traditional? 

We need a bit more creativity at CCCC to help establish a 
new learning environment, one that brightens our moods 
and increases our learning, and one that sets us apart from 
other schools. 

Students would have a choice whether they would like to 
participate. Each participating student would receive a sec- 
tion of the hallway to decorate. The student would be given 
one week to design it in any way they felt expressed them- 
selves. The point of this would be to send a message to 
fellow classmates. 

A great deal of problems face our society I believe that 
allowing students to express their thoughts on our world 
through art would be significant to everyone. Not only the 
artist, but also the person who stops to enjoy the arj. 

Signed, 
Karen Butler 

Student supports expansion; 
denounces funding nnfethod 

To The Editor: 

It has come to my attention that there are sentiments on 
campus concerning my position on the proposed upgrade, 
renovation and new building as presented by President Kraus 
to the Board of Trustees. In an effort to clarify my position, 
I am writing this letter. 
1)1 support bringing this campus into full compliance 

w/ADA requirements. 
2)1 support the renovation of current buildings. 
3)1 support the building of an additional facility gn cam 
pus. 

Be informed that I did ngt prior to the Board of Trustees 
Meeting, I do net now, nor do I envision a time in the future 
that I will believe that students should bear the cost of the 
proposed projects! I do recognize that the reality of the 
situation is such that some increase is inevitable. However, 
I have represented the students by stating to the Board of 
Tmstees and to the President that students expect for the 
intended $3 increase that all proposed items be delivered as 
stated in the building plan. Furthermore, my position is 
such that the responsibility of securing funding for the project 
belongs squarely on the shoulders of those hired by Presi- 
dent Kraus as well as the President himself. In addition, our 
legislators must work harder for our district educational 
needs. 

That was my position on March 17, it is my position now 
and I am confident it will remain my position. Thank you 
for this time. 

Sincerely, 
Deborah Currier 



MdJNSHEET\ 



Editorial Staff 

Brian Ford, Nancy Brennan, Amy Paine Gold, Jack 
Higgins, Bob Koenig, Terri Ladd, Darlene Mokrycki, 
Biyan Russell 

Contributors 

Edward Almedia, Julie Biggs, Sue Celli, Earle Collins, 
Mea Costa, Robert Currier, Carole Donahue, Debroah 
Etsten, Elizabeth Gouveia, Joseph Gouveia, Jana Jones, 
Sy\>\\ Owens, Lori Peny, Michael Torre, Richard Weath- 
ers 

Faculty Advisor 
William Babner 



Page 4 Mainsheet April 14, 1994 



sessions set to sizzle 

Session II Schedule - June 20 - August 5 



NURSING 



*of Agmg 

BCaO-a Mon. + Wed„ S«)-730 pjn, N105, 
Hwous Shuiley 

G«raatalog7 Pncticnin 

C£206^ Contact Carla Priest (3«2-2131, est. 384) 

HEALTH, FITNESS, 
RECREATION AND SAFETY 

Uciltti 

Sfnsa Maiugcment for Optimal Health 

TH 110-63 Tues. + Thuis.. 4flO-7:00 p.in.. CIM, 

MarcyJ.Snuth 



LITERATURE 



Peraoiud ntness 

Lni7-63 Mon. ■»- Wed., 630-9:30 p-m., Gym B,. 

/oanne Dunnock 

Advanced Fiist Aid and Emergency Care 
Lf332-63 Tues. + Thuis., 10.-00 ajn.-l:00 p-m.. Gym, 
L3fnda Be i gstiom 

IF131-64 Mon.+Wed.,6:30-9J0p.m.,Gym, 
Michael Stines 

HISTORY 

U.S. History since 1865 

imiOi-63 Mon. + Wed., 9:00-11:50 p.m.,TBA. 
Joe PoUto 

The Civil War 

HH117-63 Tues. + Thurs., 6:3O-9J0 p.m., TBA, 

Carol Bowers 

HORTICULTURE 

Entomology and Plant Diseaaea 

tAHl02-63 Mon. + Wed.,6J0-9;30p.m.,Scll2, 
Dave Simser 

HOTEURESTAURANT 
MANAGEMENT 

Dietetic Service Supervisor-Module III: Sanitation 
Bm27'63 Tues. + Thuis., 6 J0-930p.m.,C106, 
Ann Love 

Dietetic Service Supcivisoi^ModuIe IL 
Management of the Dietary Department 
BH128-63 Mon. + Wed..6J0-9J0p.m.,C106, 
Ann Love 

Hotel/Restatuant Cooperative Work Experience 
0H261-63 Contact Don Witkoski (362-2131 ext 402) 



Introduction to Oiildrcn's Literature 

ENUO-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9:00-1150 ajn., N114, ICTrask 



literary Masterpieces n 

EN202-63 Mon. + Wed.,6:30-9-.30p.m.,N114,Carirohnson 



MANAGEMENT 



Human Resources Marugement 

BG207-S3 Mon.+Wed.,6J0-9J0pjn.,NG6,MlchaelBeitlich 

Management 

BC214-63 Tues. + Thuis., 6:30-9-30 p.m., NG7, John Fielding 

Marugement Cooperative Woric Experience I 
BG261-63 Contact Michael Bejtlich (362-2131, ext 351) 



MARKETING 



Marketing 

BM205-63 Tues. -f Thuis., 6:30-9:30 p.m.,SO106, Staff 

MATHEMATICS 

(also see Deveiopmentat Edueatian and Computer Science) 

Survey of Mathematics 

tAAlOl-63 Mon. + Wed., 630-9-30 p.m., NG9, Ronald Fenn 

Elementary Statistics 

AMI06-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9K)0-1150 a.m., N118, Staff 

MAI06-64 Tues.+Thurs.,630-9-30pjn.,N103,PfeterGacdone 

Precalculus Mathematics I 

MAJOS-eS Mon., Wed. + Thuis., 9K)0-1150 a jn., NI07, Staff 

Precalculus Mathematics 11 

MA109-63 Mon.^Wed.,630-930p.m.,N120,BeatriceDelacy 

Calculus I 

MA201-63 Mon., Wed. + Thuis., 9.-00-ll:50 a.m., NGIO, 
Russell Norton 

Calculus II 

AM202-63 Mon., Wed. + TTiurs.„ 630-930 p.m., N107, 
Thomas Jaillet 



MUSIC 



Music Appreciation 

EH140-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9«)-1150 a.m., NG5, E. Kelly 



Applied Music 

EH150-63 Contact Robert fOdd (362-2131, ext. 350) 



Advanced Applied Music 

£ifl55-63 Conbct Robert Kidd (362-2131, ext. 350) 



Fegistration into tfu Nursing courss is restricted to students 
admitted to the evening Nursing program. Interested students 
should contact the eoening Nursing program coordinator. 

Ruumacology 

7H200-63 Tues. + TTims., 630-930 p.m., Lee B, PeterScarafile 



OFRCE TECHNOLOGY 



Advanced Word Ftoceviing Applications 

05113-63 Tues. -^ Thurs., 630-930p.m.,5O117,GaiiGuanno 

Office Technology Cooperative Woric Experience 
BS262-63 Contact CanulleBeale (362-2131, ext 402) 



PARALEGAL STUDIES 



Intnxjuction to Substantive Law 

8S12M3 Tues. * Tliuis., 630-9-^0 fi.m, SO107, N. Comu 

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT 

Re^trtOion into the Physical Therapist Assistant program is 
restrictedtostudentsadmittedtotheProgram. Interested students 
should contact the pr ogra m coordinator. 

Kinesiolo^ for the FTA 

PT104-63 Mon., Wed. + Fri.. Noon-130 p.m., Lee A, L. Roy 



PHYSICS 



Physics I 

MC103-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9«)a.m.-100 p.m., Sai4, 

Thomas Muiphy 

POLITICAL SCIENCE and GOVERNMENT 

International Relations 

'HG102-71 Tues. V Thurs., 6;00^:40p.m., Hyannis Campus, 
Staff 

American Government 

HGIIl-63 Mon. + Wed., 630-9:30 p.m., N104. Joe Polilo 



PSYCHOLOGY 



General Psychology 

HBI0J-63Mon. + Wed.,630-930pjn.,NG7,CSdiulaiburg 

HBWl'71 Tues.-i-Thurs.,8K]0-10:40a.m.,HyaniusCampus, 

Staff 

HBlOl-79 Telecourse, Richard Gaboon 

Child Psychology 

HB2£Jl-63 Mon. ^ Wed., 630-930 p.m., NI17, M. Relin 

HBZOl-79 Telecouise, Helen Goolishian 

Adolescent Psychology 

HB2Q2-63 Tues. + Tliuis., 630-930 p.m., NI18, J. Crider 

Abnormal Psychology 
'HB207-63 Tues. +Thuis., 630-930 pjn.,SO10S,M. Howard 



PsychoIogrofWaawn 

HB219-63 Tuet. + Thurs., 630430 pm, Lcc A. 
Heloi Goolishian 

Devetopnwiital Psychology: The Uf e Span 
HB233-63 Mon. * Wed., 630-930 p jn., SOIOS, &taf 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Introduction to Andio and Video ftodnction 
EDUa^ Man. + Wed., 630-930pm, TV Studio, 
Steve Ledair 

REAL ESTATE 

Prindplea of Real EiUle 

88181-63 Mon.<-We<l,63MJ0pjn.,N117, 

CharleaSabatt 

RETAIL MANAGEMENT 

Retail Coopctative Woik Expctieocc I 
SM261-63 Contact B. Swaebe (3«2-2131. ext 398) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Principlea of Sociology 

HB106-63 Tues. + Thuis., 9^)0-1150 a.m., Lee B, 

LeoLortie 

HB106^ Tues. + Thuis., &30-930 p.m., NllS, 

Randall Powers 

Juvenile Delinquency 

HB205-63 Mon. + Wed., 630-930 p.in.,NI06, 
W. Brooks Smidi 

Race, Clais and Culture in the U.S. 

HBZ06-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9fl0-1150a.m., TBA, 
Lee Hamilton . 

HB206-71 Mon. + Wed., 6:004:40 p.m., Hyannis 
Campus, Roseanna Warfield 



SPANISH 



Elementary Spanish I 

£U05-63 Mon., Wed. + Thuis, 630-930 p.m., NG9. 

Christine Esperson 



THEATRE 



Acting I 

ED103-63 Wed.,. 5:00-11:00 p.m.. Studio Theatre, 

James Silverman 

Acting n 

ED104^ Wed., 5K)0-I1K}0 p.m.. Studio Theatre, 

James Silverman 

Creative Dramatics 

£0114-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9K)0-11;50 a.m.. Studio 

Theatre, Joanne CaUum ' '^'' ' 



Session III Schedule - July 11 - August 19 



ACCOUNTING 



ENGUSH 



Accounting Cooperative Woric Experience ! 
B.Uei-90 Contact Roger Cole (36Z-2I31, ext 338) 



COMMUNICATION 



Oral Communication 

EN103-90 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 8.-00-9iS0 ajn., N106, 
Gloria Brundage 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Microcomputer Applications Software 

BDllO-90 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., I0K)0-1150 a.m., 
SO108, Ddrora Morgan 

Computer Information Systems Cooperative Woric 

Experience 

BD261'90 Contact Richard Bermrdin (362-2131, ext 351) 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



Criminology Theory and Practice 

HL105-90 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thuis., 8K)0-950 a jn., N1I7, 

GaiySeeley 

Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience 

HL26I-gO Contact W. Brooks Smith (362-2131, ext 334) 

DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION 

Deoelopmentaleducation credits cannot be countedin thedetermi- 
nation of the sixt;/ academic credits requiredfbr the A.A. and A.S. 



Engliih 

Foundations in Writing 

Efll03-90 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., lOKMrllJO a.m., 

NllS, David Gillespie 

College Reading and Study SldUs 

£B101-90Mon., Tues.. Wed. + Thurs.,10.-00-1130a.m., TBA, 
Ken Gavin 



Elementary Algebra * 

DEOeO-SO Mon., Tue^., Wed. + Thuis., S.HX)-930 a.m., N103, 
LesBelzer 

Intermediate Algebra 

OE061-90 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 10:00-1130 a.m., 
N103, Minxie Zhang 



(also see Deoelapmental Education, journalism, and Literature) 

English Composition I 

EWlW-90 Mon., Tues., Wed. + TTiuis., 10:00-1150 a.m., 

N104, Donald Heines 

English Composition II 

EN102-90 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thuis., lOrfJO-1130 a.in., 

N116, Michael Helfen 

Critical Reading and Thinking 

EN108'9O Men., Tues., Wed. + TTiurs., 8fl0-950 ajn., N104, 

Jc^ French 



HISTORY 



Histoiy of Western Civilization 1815-PrefCnt 

HHI56-90 Men., Tues, Wed. * Thurs., 1000-11:50 a-m., 
N117, Carol Bowers 

HOTEURESTAURANT MANAGEMENT 

Hotel/Restaurant Cooperative Work Experience 
8H2ei-90 Contact Donald Witkoski (3«2-2131, ext 402) 



MANAGEMENT 



Supervision 

BG103-90 Mon., Tues., Wed.+Thuis.,10«)-1150a.m.,NG6, 
Donald Lafler 

Management Cooperative Work Experience I 
BG26I-90 Contact Michael BejtUch (362-2131, ext 351) 



NURSING 



Registraiion into the Nursing courses is restricted to students 
admitted to the evening Nursing program. Interested students 
should contact the evening Nursing program a>ordinator. 

Pharmacology Calculations 

NUlOO-90 Mon., Tues., Wed, + Thurs., 10^)0-1130 a.m., 

TBA. Susan Miller 



OFRCE TECHNOLOGY 



Advanced Word Aocessing Applications 

BSn3-30 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Tliurs., 10:00-1150 a.n 

S0117, Gail Guarino 



FOREVER LIVE IN THE UPPER ECHELONS OF 

MEDIOCRITY, or 

advertiseinTHEMAINSHEET 



Computer Keyboaiding 

BS116-90 Mon.. Tues., Wed. 4. Thurs.. 8:00-9:50 ajon., 

7/U-7/21, SOUS, Nancy Buckley 

Bectrotuc File and Data Management 

BSI30-90Mon,Tues..Wed.l.Thui5.,««)-930ajn.,SO117, 
Gail Guarino 

Office Technology Cooperative Work Experience 
BS261-90 ConbctCamiUeBeale (362-2131. ext 402) 

PHILOSOPHY 

Contemporary Ethical Problems 

HP 125-90 Moa, Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 8K)0-950a.m., TBA, 
Arthur Barry 

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT 

Rtgistmtion inta the Physical Therapist Assistaat pngiam is 
TtstrictedtostmiatlsadmittedtothePngnnn. Intettsteii students 
shoujd amtaet the ptu^iai n ajordimdor. 

FFA Practicum I 

PT105-90 Contact Robin Mclntyn (3eZ-213I, ext 335) 



PSYCHOLOGY 



General Paycfaologjr 

HIIlOI-90 Men, Tues, Wed. 4. Thuis.. 

10:00-11:50 ajn., 50107, James Cnder 



RETAIL MANAGEMENT 



Retail Cooperative Work Experience I 

BM2ei-90 Contact Barbara Swaebe 
(362-2131, ext 398) 



SOCIOLOGY 



Juvenile Delinquency 

HB205-90 Mon.. Tues., Wed. * Thurs., 
10.«)-lia) ajn., NG7, Gary Seeley 



c 



ADULT RE-ENTRY ■ 
WOMEN and MEN in TRANSITION 



Jl 



ThepurposeoftheADULTRE-ENTRYWOMENandMENinTRANSrnONPROGRAMistoassistandsupportneworreturmng i 

students. The program is an academic, vocational shll building end career couiiselingprogrnmt^eredthrou^ the Women's Rtsouret 
Center and the Men in Transition project at Cape Cod Community College. 



Gel a Head Start! 

Choose from a selection of skill-building courses to 
"^rush-up" rusty skills and boost your confidence. 
Reduce math anxiety with a self-paced, individualized 
math workshop covering math and algebra topics. 

Information sessions are held weekly on Mondays a 1 5:30 
p.m. and Thursday at 11:00 a.m. Please call (508)362-8857 
or (508)362-2131, ext. 405 for information. 

DEVELOPMENTAL MATH WORKSHOP 

non-credit $185 

Concepts of arithmetic and algebra taught in a congenial 
and non- threatening en\dronment for studenb who have 
experienced anxiety related to the study of mathematics. 
Techniques in stress reduction, relaxation, study skills, 
note-taking and test-taking will be examined. This course 
is an excellent preparation for DE il, DE 060, or OE 061. 
WS020^3 Wed., 9 00 a jn.-Noon, TBA, Staff 

WS020-64 Wed., 630-9:30 p.m., TBA, Staff 

ORIENTATION TO COLLEGE and STUDY SKILLS 
WORKSHOP 

Wednesday, August 24 and Friday, August 26 
Student Commons Building, Room C106 
lOKX) a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 



SUMMER PROGRAM 

June 20 through August 4 

(unless othenoise indicated) 



Monday an^ Wednesday 9O0 a.m. - Noon 
EBWl-63 College Reading and Study 

Skills, Patricia Panitz 



Monday anrf WgdnewJay 630-9:30 p.m. 
DE051-64 Basic Arithmetic Skills, 

Tom Murphy 



Tuesday an^ Thundfly ^^°Q '-"^ - ^^^ 
EB103-63 Foundations in Writing, 

Laurel Komhiser 
HB219-63 Psychology of Women, 

930 ajiL - 1230 p.m.. 
May 31-July 7 



Tuesday and Thursday afternoon 



6S1I6-65 



DEQ60-64 
BDUO-63 



Computer Keyboarding, 

4K)0-6K» p.m. Staff 
Elementary Algebra, Staff 
Microcomputer Application 
Software, David Ziemba 



Page 5 MalnSheet April 14, 1994 



Three summer school 

Session I Schedule - May 31 - July 8 



Need credits to graduate? Or maybe you just want to take that History or Art course 
that didn't fit into you're winter schedule. 

Well, you're in luck, the summer schedule is out. 

This year's summer schedule includes two new six week sessions in addition to the 
usual seven week session. Dates for the three new sessions include May 3 1-July 8, June 
20- August 5, and July 11-August 19. The second summer session, June 20-August 5, 
will have day and evening classes and wiU last for seven weeks. 

Students should register for classes at the registrar's office before the start of the 
session which they plan to attend. But register early, classes only have a limited num- 
ber of seats. 



ACCOUNTING 



Accounting Cooperative Work 

Experience I 

BA261'80 Contact Roger Cole (362-2131, Ext 338) 



BUSINESS 



Intrnduction to Business 

BG] 00-80 Mon.,Tues.,Wed.+Thurs..lO.-00-ll:50a.n\„NG6, 
Neil Cronin 

CERTinED NURSE AIDE 

(Refer to page ?? for pre-admission information.) 
Tri-Level Certified Nuise Aide/Home Health Aide 

7Hn7-flOMon. through Fri.,8:30-2J0p.m.,5/16-7/2,Scl04, 
Rosemary Dillon 



COMMUNICATION 



Oral Communication 

ENW3-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thuis., 8K)0-950 a.m., N106, 
PhyUis Lee 

COMPUTER 
INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Microcomputer Applications Software 

BDU 0-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 8K)0-9£0 a jil, SOI08, 

Debora Morgan 

Computer Information Systems Cooperative Work 
Experience 

BD261-80 Contact Richard Bemardin (362-2131, ExL 351) 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



Police and Court Systems 

HLUS'SO Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 8.-00-950 a.m.,SO105, 

GarySeeley 

Introduction to Corrections 
JlHLl 1 6-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. ■*■ Thurs., 10:00-1150 a.m.. TBA, 
GarySeeley 

Criminal Justice Cooperative Woric Experience 
HL261-80 ContactW. Brooks Smidi (362-2131, Ext 401) 



DEVELOPMENTAL 
EDUCATION 



Developmental education credits cannot be countedinlhe determi- 
nation of the sixtifoauiemic credits required for the AA. and AS. 
degrees. 

English 

College Reading and Study Skills 

EB1Q1-8Q Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thuis., 10.-00-11:50 a.m., 

N117, Lora Ziemba 

4 
Foundations in Wntmg 

EB103S0 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 8KX>-9:S0 a.m., N117, 
Louise Deutsch 

Math 

Basic Arithmetic Skills 

DEOSl-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 8K)0-9:50 a.m., NllS, 
Lauren Heyl 

Elementary A4gebra 

DEO6O-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 8:00-950 a.m., N103, 

Mary Moynihan 

Intermediate Algebra 

DE061-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 10:00-1150 a.m., 
N103, Ted Panitz 



ECONOMICS 



Principles of Economics 1 

EC111-3Q Mon.,'Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 8:00-950 a.ni., NG6, 
Virender Gautam 



ENGUSH 



(also sa Devtlopmental Education, fountalism, and 
Literature) 

English Composition I 

ENlOl-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thuis., 8.«)-950 a-m., NI04, 
Usa Martin 

English Composition >I 

ENIOISO Mon., Tues., Wed. * Thuis., 10K)0-n50 a.m., 

N116, Bany McPhee 

Critical Reading and Thinking 

EN108-S0 Mon., Tues., Wed. * Thuis.. 10:00-1150 a.m., 

N104,Ckaige Albeit 



HEALTH, FITNESS, 
RECREATION AND SAFETY 

standard Fint Aid tc Basic Life Support 

LF130-S0 Moa, Tues., Wed. t Thuis., 10J)0a.m.-l:00 p.m.. 
Gym, 5/31.6/14, Lynda Beigstrom 

HISTORY 

U. S. History since 1865 

HH104-S0 Mon., Tues., Wed. * Thuis., lOOO-lO-JO a.m, 

Lee A, Caiol Bowers 

HOTEL/RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT 

HoteiyKesuuiant Coopeiative Woik Experience 

BH26I.80 Contact Donald Wilkoski (362-2131, Ext. 402) 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Refer to page ?? for information on International Studies. 

UTERATURE 

American Literature since 2890 
'EN206-B0 Mon., Tues., Wed. -i- Thurs., I0.-00-1150 a.m., 
NllS, Dennis Martin 

' MANAGEMENT 

Management 

BG214-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. * Thuis., 10:00-11:50 a.m., 
SO106, Michael Bejtiich 

ManageinenI Coopeiative Woik Experience I 

8C261-S0 Contact Michael BejtUch (exl 351) 

MATHEMATICS 

(also see Developmental Education and Computer Science} 

Elementary Statistics 

MA106-80 Mon., Tues., Wed. + Thurs., 10:00-1150 a.m., 
NG7, Ann Evans 

NURSING 

Registration into the Nursing courses is restricted to students 
admitted to the evening Nursing program. Interested students 
should contaa the evening Nursing program coordinator. 

LFN to RN Educal ional Mobility Program 

NU130-80 Man. + Thurs., 8:00-330 p.m., 6/2-7/28, SclOl, 
Barbara Murphy 

OFRCE TECHNOLOGY 

Word Processing Concepts and Applications 

BS2I0-80 Mon, Tues, Wed.+Thms.,8J10-950ajn.,SO117, 
Nancy Buckley 



Cbmpnler Keyboaiding 

BSlliSO Mon, Tues, Wed. t Thuis., 10«)- 

1150 ajn., 5/31.6/16, S0115, Nancy Buckley 

Electnmic Fablisliing 

SS226.«0 Mon., Tues., Wed. * Thuis., VXK- 

1150 ajn., SO108, Nancy Buckley 

Office Technology Cooperative Woik Experience 
BS261-S0 Contact Camille Beale (36^2131, Est 402) 

PHYSICAL THERAPIST 
ASSISTANT 

Registration into the Physical Therapist Assistant pro- 
gram is restricted to students admilled to the Program. 
Interested students should contact the program coordirut- 



FT A Practimm I 

PT105-80 Contact Robin Mclntyre 
(362-2131, ExL 335) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

General Psychology 

HBIOI-SO Mon, Tues., Wed. t Thure., 10«)- 

1150 a.m, SO107, Staff 

Psychology of Women 

HB219-S0 Mon., Tues, Wed. * Thuis., lOKX)- 
11 50 a.m., TBA, Helen Goolishian 

RETAIL MANAGEMENT 

Retail Cooperative Work Experience I 
BM261-80 Contact Barbara Swaebe 

(362-2131, ext. 398) 



SOCIOLOGY 



Principles of Sociology 

HBJ06-S0 Mon, Tues.. Wed. ^■ Thuis.. 10:00- 
1150 a.m,SO105, Staff 



Session II Schedule - June 20 - August 5 



ACCOUNTING 



Aecounting I 

BAWl'63 Mon., Tues. * Thurs.,- 9*0-1150 ajn., SOG8, 

Jiianta Sweet 

BAlOl-64 Mon., Wed., + Thuis., 630-9KX)p.m.,SOG8, 

Paul LaBouIiere 

Accounting n 

BA102-63 Mon., Wed., + Thurs.. 650-9K)0 pjTL, mi6, ' 

Alan Curtis 

Accounting Cooperative Work Experience I 
BA261-63 Contact Roger Cole (362-2131, Ext 338) 

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 

American Sign Language I 

EFlOl-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9K)0-1150 ajn., NG8, 

Aiuie McLaughlin 

EFIOI'64 Tues. + Thurs., 630-9:30 p.m., NG8, Staff 

American Sign Language II 

EF102-63 Mon.-*- Wed., 6:30-930 pjn.,NG8,Wimam dark 



ART 



Survey of Women Artists 

EH105-63 Tues. + Thurs., 630-930 p.m., Shidio A, 

Galina McGuire 

Survey of Folk Art 

EHlU-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9:00-1150 a.m. Studio A, Staff 

Life Drawing 

EH120-63 Tues. + Thurs., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Shidio A, 
Phyllis Szerejko 

Painting I 

EH128-63 Mon. + Wed., 9:00-1150 a.m.. Studio A, 
AruiGuiliani 

Graphic Design 

EH129-63 Mon. + Wed., 630-9:30 p.m., Shidio A, V. Just 

, Introduction to Fiintmaking 

; EH215-63 Mon. + Wed., 630-93(^.m., Shidio B.Sara Ringler 

. Watcrcolor I 

;EH230-63 Tues. + Thuis., 9.-00-1 150a.m.. Studio B, C Velesig 



BIOLOGY 



Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

MB107-63 Lecture: Tues. + Thurs.. IIKM a.m--2--00 p.m., 
Lee A, Ub: Tues. + Thurs., 9.-00-1050 ajn., SCG7, Staff 



MB107-64 Lecture: Mon. + Wed., IIKW a.m.-2i)0 p-m., 
Lee B, Lab: Mon. + Wed., 9K)0-I050 am, SCG7, J. McGuire 

Human Axutomy and Physiology 11 

MB108-63 Lecture: Tues. + Thuis., 11:00 ajn.-2d)0 pjn., 
LecCLab:Tues.+Thuis^9:00-1050ajiv,SCG3,TAntkowiak 

bitrodnction to Environmental Science 

MBU8-63 Mon., Wed., + Thurs., 630-10:00 pjn., SCG3, 

Roger Faucher 

Coastal Ecology 

A1B125-63 Tues. + Thurs., 630-930p.m., SC114, G. Newton 

Concepts in Biology I 

MBt3l-63 Lecture: Mon. + Wed., 11K» a.m.-r-00 pjn., 

SC103, Lab: Moti. + Wed.,9iX)-105aLm.3cG3, Helen Reuter 

Microbiology 

MB219-63 Lecture: Mon. + Wed., 10:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m., 
SC107, Lab: Mon. + Wed., 8:00-950 ajn., SC107, 
Hemant Chikarmaiw 

MB219-64 Lecture - Tues. + Thurs.. 11:00 a.m-2;00 p.m.. 
SC107, Lab - Tues. + Thurs., 9:00-1050 a.m., SC107, 
Paul Chamberlin 

BUSINESS 

Introduction to Business 

BClOO-63 Tues. + Thurs., 6:30-930 p.m., NG5, D. Morgan 
BClOO-79 Telecourse, Gail McCormick 

Business Law I 

BGI20-63 Tues. + Thuis., 6-30-930 p.m., NG6, C Andrade 

CHEMISTRY 

General Chemistry I 

MClOl-63 Lechire: Tues. + Thurs., 9.-00-1150 a.m., TBA, 
LabiTues. +Thurs. JNIoon-2.-00p.m.,SC220, Richard Wonkka 

Chemistry for the Health Sciences 
MClU-63 Lechire - Mon. + Wed., IIKW a.m.-2.-00 p.m., 
SC114, Lab - Mon, + Wed.. 9:00-1050am, SC218, M. Rich 
MCin-64 Lecture - Tues. + Thurs., XIKM a.m.-2.iX) p.m, 
N106, Ub - TuM. + Thurs., 9K)0-1050 ajn., SC218, 
Bruce Campbell 



COMMUNICATION 



Oral Communication 

EN103-63 Mon. + Wed.,9«)-1150a.m.,NG8, 

Sheryll Hirshberger 

ENI03-64 Tues. ■•- Thurs., 630-930 p.m., N114, David Wills 



. Interpersorud Commonication 
£N204-63Mon. + Wed., 9«)-1150 ajn., N10S,Nancy Brock 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Microcomputer Applications SofhvaR 
BDllO-63 Tues. + Thurs., 630-930 p.m„ SOIOB, D. Ziemba 
BDnO-72 Mon. -f Wed., 8.-00-10:40 ajn., Hyaimis Campus, 
Robert Baker 

Computer Information Systems Cooperative Work 
Experience 

BD261-63 Contact Richard Bemardin (362-2131, ext. 351) 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Criminology Theory and Practice 

HL105-63 Mon. + Wed., 630-930 pjn., Lee A, David Keefe 

Criminal Justice Cooperative Work Experience 

HL261-63 Contact W. Brooks Smith (362-2131, ext. 334) 

DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION 

DeDelopmentaleducatwncreditscanjwtbeamntedinthedetermi- 
nation of the sixty academic credits rtipiiredfor theA^ and AS. 
degrees. 

ffngli^h 

PREP for College Reading 

EBlOO-71 Tues. + Thurs., 8KK)-10:40 a.m., Hyannis Campus, 
Lawrence Gallagher 

College Reading and Study Skills 

£B101-63Mon. + Wed., 9K)0-1150a.m.,NG9,Patricia Panitz 

Foundations in Writing 

EB103-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9HX»-H 50 a.m., NG9, L Komhiser 

Math 

Basic Arithmetic Skills 

D£05I-64Mon.+Wed.,63O-930p.m.,NllS,ThomasMurphy 
DE05J-71 Mon. + Wed., 8:00-10:40 a.m., Hyannis Campus. 
Kathleen Boland 

Elementary Algebra 

DE060-63 Tues. + Thuis., 9:00-1 150a.m., NG9, George Bent 
DE060-64 Tues. + Thurs., 630-930 p.m., NG9, Ted Panitz 

Intermediate Algebra 

DE06I-63 Mon. + Wed., 9:00-1150 ajn., NllS, Terry Popp 
DE06I-64 Mon. + Wed., 630-930 p.m., N103, James Sears 



EAR LY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Courses offered in Early Childhood Education have been approved 
by Massachusetts Office for Children. 

Curriculum Plarming for Eariy Childhood 
Education 

HC201-63 Mon. + Wed., 630-930 p.m., SO106, 
Ginger Thauer 



Advanced CnxricnlttB DevdapnMnfc Cicatrve 
Qcperienccfl for Early CbiMhood Education 

HC202-63 Tues. + Thurs., 630*30 pjn., NGIO. 
Debra Smith 

A Awnini»trfti^at of Eady Childhood PrDgisius 
HC290-63 Mon. + Wed^ 630930 pjn., N120, 
Maggie Donahue 

EARTH SCIENCES 

[ntrodaction to Oceanography 

MC120-63 Man. + Wed,, 630-930 pjn., SC114, 

David Gates 

ECONOMICS 

Principles of Economics I 

ECin-71 Tues. + Thuis., 8.-00-10:40 ajn.. Hyannis 
Caii^us, Joe Bair 

Principles of Economics n 

ECU2-63 Mon. + Wed., 630-930 pjn., LecC, 

Dorothy Bunill 

Economics of Aging 

EC220-63 Mori. + Wed., 5.-00-750p.in.,N10S, 
Thomas Shanley 



ENGUSH 



(also see Developmental Education, jourjudism, and 
Literature) 

English Composition I 

ENlOl-63 Mon. + Wed., 9*0-1150 ajn., NU4, 

Michael Olendzenski 

ENlOl-64 Tues. + Thurs., 630-9-30 pjn., N106, 

Patricia McGraw 

English CompfMition 11 

ENW2-63 Tues. + Thuis., 9K)0-1150 a.m., N105, 
Dianne Gregory 

ENI02-64 Tues. + Thurs., 630-930 p.m., N105, 
Sarah Polito 

Creative Writing 

EN209-63 Tues. + Thurs., 9:00-1150 a.m., N103, 

Lisa Franklin 

EN209-64 Sun. - Fri., 8/21-8/26. Craigville 

Conference Center, Marion Vuilleumier, 

Contact Writer's ConfeieiuM for costs which are in 

addition to the College Fees. 



RLM 



The American Film 

EN14S-63 Mon. + Wed., 5-30-9:00 p.m., N118, 
Dermis Martin 



GERONTOLOGY 



Health and Aging 

G£I0!-63Mon. + Wed..650-9:30p.m.,C106,C.Priest 



Page 6 MalnSheet April 14,1994 



Entertainment 



Schindler 's List 

Speilberg*s masterpiece depicts the terror of the Holocaust 



by MEA COSTA 
StaffWriter 

Out of the horror of the Holocaust comes a story of merit. 
"Schindler's List," the latest movie by Oscar wimiing Direc- 
tor Steven Spielberg, is a three hour black and white docu- 
drama. Based on the 1982 Booker Prize winning novel by 
Thomas Keneally, "Schindler's List" portrays the transfor- 
mation of Oskar Schindler from an active member of the 
Nazi party seeking his fortune at the expense of others, to 
the savior of 1 , 1 00 Jews employed in his factory who would 
have otherwise been exterminated at death camps. 

Using authentic locations in Krakow, Poland, Spielberg 
recreates the brutality of the Holocaust. His use of black 
and white film presents the movie like an old newsreel from 
viliich a great number of the scenes of the movie are taken. At 
one point in the film Spielbeig shows a young girl in a red 
coat. The colored segment leads the viewer's focus to the 



'She represents the needless 
and mindless killing of thou- 
sands of people just be- 
cause they were Jewish. The 
girl is only about six years 
old, but simply because she 
is Jewish she is slaughtered 
along with many others.' 



girL She represents the needless and mindless killing of 
thousands of people just because they were Jewish. The girl 
is only about six years ol4 but simply because she is Jewi^ 



she is slaughtered along with many others. 

Spielbeig uses the three main characters of the film to i 
draw the viewers in by depicting the conflicting elements of; 
the time. Ralph Fieimes, nominated for Best Supporting 
Actor, plays Amon Goeth, the psychopathic ccmcentration 
camp coitunandant and epitomizes the madness of the Nazi 
regime. BenKingsley,\«4iowaspassedupforanOscariiomi- 
nation, plays the role of Itzhak Stem, the Jewish accountant 
who runs Schindler's &ctory. Stem is a silent hero helping 
fellow Jews seek refuge in Schindler's fectory. Liam Neeson, 
nominated for Best Actor, stars as the would-be hero Oskar 
Schindler. Neescm portrays Schindler as a man who is gradu- 
ally transformed by all the senseless murder being commit- 
ted around him. 

"Schindler^ List" is brilliant Steven Spielbeig presents a 
poignant portrayal of one of history's most horrifying mo- 
ments. It is a deHnite must-see. 



CD Review: New Phish a real catch 



By Rich Weathers 

StaffWriter 

Bring on summer! The first turn it xxp and roll down the 
wdndows album of the year is here. Burlington, Vermont's 
Phish have released their fiflh albimi, entitled Hoist, and you 
will hear it everywhere this summer where there is beer, young 
people partying, and that familiar but illegal smell in tl^ie air. 

Afler listening to the first two songs, "Julius" and "Down 
with Disease" (the first single off the album), one feels that 
Pliish is going mainstream. In these songs. Trey Anastasio, 
lead singer and guitarist, and pianist Page McConnell cast 
some catchy lines over a very tight rhythm section of Mike 
Gordon on bass and John Fishman on drums. The band then 
makes a trademark, surreal transition into the third song "If I 
Could." From here on Phish fans will be pleased by a new 
dose of the bands quirky lyrics and melodies. 

The ever experimental Phish seascmed their jazz influenced 

Movie Review: 



rock sound with some big names from the bluegrass (Bela 
Fleck), funk (Tower of Power Horns), and classical (The Rich- 
ard Greene Fourteen) music fields for this album. 

If you have never heard bluegrass before, you must listen 
to Bela Fleck's banjo jams on Scent of a Mule. There is even 
hebrew chant thrown in to kick off the final track. Demand, 
and add another freshly absurd element to the Cd. 
The song "Sample in a Jar" and the final track "Demand," a 
classic Phish instrumental, are among Phish's best songs to 
date and will become instant favorites. 

For those who are "foggy, rather groggy," as Trey sings in 
"Sample in a Jar," at Phish's annual New Year's Eve Bash, 
Hoist is a chance to hear some of the less remembered songs 
frcan the concert. 



CCCC Student Senate 

presents 

Peter Wolf 

and 

The Houseparty 5 



Saturday, April 23, 1 994 
CCCC Field House 

Tickets $10.00 

Tickets available at the Student Activities 
Office in \he Upper Commons 



Reality Bites finds the lost generation 



by EARLE COLLINS 
StaffWriter 

Reality Bites is Hollywood's latest at- 
tempt at defining the 'X' generation. This 
fUm by far bests other films in depicting 
the lives of recent college graduates. 

The most favorable aspect of the movie is 
its breaks from com- 
mercial grunge ste- 
reotypes of genera- 
tion 'X'ers. One of 
the most obvious 
breaks being that the 
fihn is set in Hous- 
ton, not Seattle, and 
flannel shirts are not 
the exclusive dress. 

Winona Ryder has 
the lead role as .. 

Lelaina, a hope fill 

documentary filmmaker. She supplies 
money for her friends until she loses her job 
and joins the legions of couch potatoes. 

Her expected boyfriend is Troy (Ethan 
Hawke) a college drop out hanging out os- 
tensibly until his band is a success. Their 
relationship includes sexual tension that 
should have ended the relationship Icmg ago. 
A change comes when TV-executive 
yuppie Michael (Ben Stiller, \i*o also di- 
rected this fihn) fells for Lelaina. Unlike 
most yq)pies in movies Michael shows some 
personality. 

Lelaina's stmggle to choose between Troy 
and Michael gives the movie its story line. 
Troy hates Michael from the start for being 
a yuppie, "He's the reason Cliff Notes were 
invented," says Troy, and is angry with 
Lelaina for seeing him. 



"One of the most obvi- 
ous breaks being that 
the film is set in Houston, 
not Seattle, and flannel 
shirts are not the exclu- 
sive dress.' 



For Michael, dealing with Lelaina and 
Troy on their terms, is nearly impossible. 
Their differences are underscored by 
Michael^ netwi^k turns Lelaina's documen- 
tary into a commercial for pizza. 

Lelaina's roommate Vickie (Janeane 
Garofelo) suffers through an ever increas- 
ing problem of the nineties, the AIDS test 
Their friend Sammy 
(Steve Zahn) faces 
the dilemma of tell- 
ing his parents he is 
gay. Both of these 
performances are 
well done and add a 
deeper sense of real- 
ism to the film. 

Despite the fact 

that most of the film 

——^—^—^—— consists of scenes 

about watching TV, 

getting stoned and finding food, it avoids 

becoming bogged down with the lack of 

action. 

The final resolution of Troy and Lelaina's 
relationship is the one part of the movie that 
drags. The scenes of Troy and Lelaina suf- 
fering without each other is an unworthy 
ending to the film. 

The soundtrack of the movie is a refresh- 
ing change fsom the overexposure to Seattle 
bands such as Pearl Jam and Soundgarden. 
Artists ranging from The Knack, Lenny 
Kravitz to The Juliana Hatfield Three pro- 
vides a variety anyone can enjoy. 

Reality Bites succeeds because it never 
becomes too serious about examining the 
'X' generation. This follows, because most 
generation 'X'ers spend little time thinking 
about it themselves. 



Two Colored print 
located on both front 
and back of shin.s 




I.A.I.A. 

Copyright 1993 

Custom Silk 
Screening Available 



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(WHITE ONLY) @ $14.00 

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Page 7 MainSheet April 14, 1994 



Features 



Cape organization rescues stranded wiiaies 



by DEBBIE ETSTEN 

Staff Writer 

When pilot whales stranded on Cape Cod 
beaches in the 1800s, local people would ea- 
gerly rush to kill the ^f/bale for its valuable 
parts. Today, when a whale beaches itself, the 
Cape Cod Whale Stranding Network rushes 
to try and save it. 

"Some animals live through the strand- 
ing while others don't. We don't really know 
why," said David Wiley, senior scientist at the 
Cape Cod Stranding Network. " The faster you 
can get to the animals the greater the success 
rate will be." 

The International Wildlife Coalition 
(IWC) set up the Cape Cod Whale Stranding 
Network in 1986 to create a trained volunteer 
aetwork to help save stranded animals. The 
[WC is an international organization dedicated 
to "assisting all animals in jeopardy from a 
scientific conservation standpoint, which on 
Cape Cod typically consists of marine mammals," explained 
Dave Simser, a part time teacher at CCCC and administra- 
tor for the Stranding Network. 

Collecting scientific data is also an important fimc- 
ion of the Whale Stranding Network since scientists are 
insure of wiiy whales strand. Whale strandings can 
ange from three or four animals to mass strandings of up to 
500 pilot wiiales. 

Nobody imderstands why whales beach themselves. 
Scientists theorize the leader of the pod could be sick, the 
«*[ole group could be sick, the animals might be pursuing 
:bod, or there might be magnetic anomalies in the waters in 
which whales habitually strand. 

Pollution may also play a part in causing vrfjales to 
itrand. Each generation of marine mammals receives con- 
%ntration of toxins in their mother's milk. This concentra- 
ion increases over their lifetime. Females then pass down 
ncreased levels of toxins to the next generation. For ex- 
unple, some Beluga \«iiales in Canada ate so infected by 
wllution, they are considered toxic waste when they die. 

Only marine mammals vnth strong social networks 




Volunteers work to save a stranded pilot wtiale In Dennis. PMota fer iMje. 

strand. Pilot whales, common dolphins, white-sided dolphins 
and bottle nosed dolphins have extremely tight social struc- 
tures. Many in the pod are related genetically w*ich may 
explain mass strandings and repeat strandings. A dolphin 
that is successfully rescued one day may beach itself again 
the next because they don't want to leave their pod. 

The hook shaped configuration of Cape Cod may act 
as a trap. During the fall, the southerly movement of water 
in Cape Cod Bay comers the animals against ftie inner curve 
of the Cape. Statistically, 27.2% of the Cape's Whale 
strandings occur in Wellfleet, 25.3% in Eastham, 14.8% in 
Brewster and 9.9% in Barnstable, confirming the trap theory. 
Strandings occur most often in the fall and winter months, 
when southern currents are predominate in Cape Cod Bay. 

The National Marine Fisheries has jurisdiction over 
all marine mammal strandings in the United States. The 
IWC has jurisdiction over all beach and rescue stranding 
operations involving marine mammals on C^k Cod. 

Efforts to rescue stranded vt4iales on C^>e Cod are 
often compUcated by weather conditions. "Contrary to popu- 
lar belief, I feel pretty strongly that the \«4iales are dying of 



hypothermia," Mr. Wiley said. Strandings 
often occur during a big Fall or Winter 
northeaster. When the whales are on the 
beach they freeze because they can't warm 
themselves through muscular contrac- 
tions. Pilot whales can weigh any- 
where from .75 tons to 2.5 tons and if 
they strand in salt marshes or harbors they 
may be inaccessible to heavy equipment. 
Volunteers must then try and move the 
wtales themselves. Each stranded whale 
gets assigned a team of volunteers. The 
first rule of stranding is that nobody stands 
in the back of the whale from the dorsal 
fin to the tail fluke. The whales are 
stressed and conAised and can start thrash- 
ing around at any time. Volunteers place 
foam under the whales to simulate water 
and keep the whales bulk from crushing 
them. The animals sizes range from the 
250 lb. common dolphin to two and a half 
ton pilot wiiales, and they must be turned 
every 30 minutes to minimize damage to their bodies. 

"Stranded whales need the interaction of people to 
replace their tight social structure," Mr. Wiley said. Teams 
are encouraged to talk to and name their whale. Volunteers 
must be ready, however, to let their whale die if they have 
to be euthanized. 

In 1991, a total of 96 wtoles and dolphins sfranded 
on Cq)e Cod beaches, 37 were rescued, 16 died on the 
beaches, and 43 were euthanized. Six animals stranded 
themselves in 1992 after severe winter hurricanes, only two 
sjurvived. Five common dolphins were stranded in Wellfleet 
Harbor in December of 1993, three were successfully re- 
leased off of Coast Guard Beach. 

The goal of the stranding network is to expand the 
knowledge necessary to rescue, aid and treat stranded ma- 
rine mammals. Collecting scientific data is an essential part 
of the stranding network. Every necropsy yields new in- 
formation about the causes and prevention of stranding. 

David Wiley is giving a lecture and training session 
for prospective members at CCCC on April 20 at 7:30 in 
the Science Building. 



^lub president responds to anti-gay propaganda 



The Criminal Justice Department and the Student Activi- 
is Office sponsored a Hate Crime panel discussion that 
ok place on TUesday, March 8th. The panel discussion 
as brought together due to the burning of a poster that 
Ivertised the time and place of the Gay-Bi-Lesbian Club 
leeting. 

Now, after the coverage this event received from the 
lainsheet, letters have been found posted on the bulletin 
sards around campus. As the letters Avere written and posted 
lonymously, the president of the GBL Club would like to 
Idress his response to the letter here. The following is the 
itter that speared on the bulletin boards, as well as a re- 
xmse from the club president. 

he following imsigned letter was found on April 4th in the 
forth Building: 

I hate to see my Activity fee money being spent on the 
rBL (Gay-Bi-Lesbian) club when some of the students are 
oing hungry. I think it's a crime that I don't see posters on 
vents that might help some of them or other members in 
le commimity who might need a hand. I feel that whom- 
yer burned the poster has a problem and needs to be disci- 
Jined. Why do we need speakers addressing this problem 
nd calling for "sensitivity training?" This must be a joke, 
ight? Did we pay these people to tell us -what anyone A\iio 
5 in coUege should know (or they shouldn't be here)? I do 
ot hate the members of the GBL club individually, but I do 
ate v/hat they stand for. They are undermining the values 
liat 1 believe in, and 1 have a right to hate their beliefs. I 
lon't have a right to conrniit arson or other crimes due to 
f»y beliefs, but have a right to my own values and a right to 
tate them by putting up my own poster rather than commit- 
ing a childish act of vandalism. 

These people have a choice in their sexuality, while many 
ithers such as African- Americans or those bom into pov- 



erty have no confrol over problems they face or racial bi- 
ases. Why can't we focus our attention on problems that 
really need addressing? We^need to put a stop on the pesti- 
lence of "political correctness." What's my money going to 
be spent on next - the Bestiality Club? 

Unsigned 



There is no "choice" involved in one's sexual orienta- 
tion. Not one person alive on this earth would make the 
conscious choice to live a life of oppression. Nobody would 
choose to live in a world of unacceptance. A world that 
fears the unknown. Who would wish to be stigmatized? 
Who would enjoy being constantly harassed, persecuted, and 
sometimes even physically beaten just because of the per- 
son they love. In this hostile world, where there are people 
that go hungry, any kind of love is a good kind of love. Gay 
people feel every bit as natural about their love as hetero- 
sexuals do. For us, it's perfectly normal. The only choice 
that exists here is A^etherto be open and accept yourself for 
the person you are, or constantly try to make yourself into 
something that you are not. 

Every person deserves the right to be accepted or re- 
jected solely on the basis of how good they are as a person, 
nothing more and nothing less. All of humanity has the 
responsibility to work toward that end. 

Allow yourself to get to know us (any minority per- 
son). You wUl find someone very much Uke yourself-we 
have hopes, dreams, hurts, defeats, love, caring and concern 
for others, family loyalties, elation and despair, and yes...even 
failures and blemishes. 

Yes, you are right-on about childish acts of vandalism. 
Meaningfijl discourse is far more effective and positive. It 
truly is unfortunate that most minorities are victims of much 
more that mere "childish acting out." 



Lastly, something should be said about "hating." No 
matter wbai any person's value system is, or v/bai their back- 
ground is, let me makq something perfectly clear. Hating is 
not acceptable. It is never okay for a person to hate. Hate is 
the cause of war and murder and rape and oppression. Hate 
desfroys. Hate causes people to do really terrible things. If 
humanity is to come togetiier and live as one, there can be 
NO HATE, and we are the ones that can make it h^>pen. 

M.J. Medeiros 
Gay-Bi-Lesbian Club, President. 



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Page 8 MalnSheet April 14. 1994 



Yom Hashoah: 300 gather in remembrance 



By DARLENEMOKRYCKI 

Copy Editor 

Liturgist: "But now we remember" 

People: "THE SILENCE WHEN MORTALS CEASED 
TO BE HUMAN AND BECAME ANIMALS OF 
DESTRUCTION AND ANIMALS IN CAPTIV- 
ITY." 

Liturgist: "But now we remember" 

People: "WHEN WE CRIED OUT TO GOD FOR DE- 
LIVERANCE, AND IT SEEMED 
THAT EVEN GOD WAS SILENT." 

These lines from a responsive reading were spoken in 
imison by some 300 observers in attendance at the interfaith 
observance, Yom Hashoah, which was held at CCCC Tilden 
Arts Center on Sunday, April 10. 

Yom Hashoah, an annual nation-wide Holocaust Re- 
membrance, was dedicated this year to "Children, the Most 
Helpless Victims." 

After a welcoming by President Richard Kraus, a greet- 
ing was delivered by Rev. Ellen C Chahey, Executive Direc- 
tor of the Cape Cod Council of Churches. 

Next, Mr. Max Springer, of the Jewish Federation of 
Cape Cod and a Holocaust survivor, introduced the remem- 
brance by recalling the one and a half million children who 
were annihilated during the Holocaust. "Amongst them per- 
haps a cure for AIDS, or Cancer," or "perhaps another 
DaVinci, or Einstein," but "we will never know, they were 
never given a chance," said Mr. Springer. 

The Cape Cod Synagogue %uth Choir, accompanied 
by Harry Easter, and directed by Celeste Monroy, sang "Eili, 
Eili" 




"O Lord, my God, I pray that these things never end: 
The sand and the sea. 
The rush of the waters. 
The crash of the heavens. 
And the prayer of man." 

The choir also performed "Dona Dona", words and 
music by Sholom Secunda. 

"A Litany of Remembrance and an Awakening to 
Hope," written by Rev. Donner Atwood, was read by Utur- 
gists and responded to by those in attendance, (see opening 
lines) 

Betsy Bishop, the daughter of a liberator spoke of 
those slain and said that the "effects of their suffering last 
to the second and third generation." 

Rev. David Nash Williams of the Unitarian Univer- 
salist Fellowship of Falmouth led a candle lighting ceremony 
in which 6 candles were lit by survivors and children of 
survivors, and vMch represented the 6 million slaughtered 
Jews. A seventh, the Yahrtzeit candle, lit by the daughter of 
a liberator, symbolized the other 6 million, mostly Chris- 
tians, who were also murdered at the hands of the Nazis. 

The Janus players, directed by P. J. McKey, presented 
an excerpt from "The Diary of Ann Frank." 

A choral presentation was staged by the Cape Cod 
Community College Choir, directed by Dr Robert Kidd. 

An interpretive dance was staged by Joanne Galium 's 
Modem Dance class depicting the lament of Jews imsure of 
v/hat would become of them. 

The " Mourner's Kaddish" was led by Rabbi Blias J. 
Lieberman, of the Falmouth Jewish Congregation. " May 
the One who causes peace to reign in the high heavens, let 



Student artworks 
were exhibited in 
the lobby of the 
Arts Center during 
the Yom Hashoah 
Ceremony of Re- 
membrance. 

photo* by Jmck Hlggliis 



CCCC arts community takes part in 
Holocaust Commemoration 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Features editor 

The CCCC Janus Players enacted a scene taken from 
"The Diary of Aime Frank," wtiich was directed by P.J. 
McKey. 

Anne Frank was a young Jewish girl hidden in an attic 
by sympathizers in Amsterdam for two years. Anne would 
read aloud from her diary wUle others in the attic sat mo- 
tionless. Her readings portrayed how the tension and fric- 
tion could build among people living together under these 
imtenable circumstances. 

She described the untold anguish of being closed in, 
and how much she missed her friends and school. It was 
hard for her to speak with her mother, and she was very 
gratefrd for her father being there to comfort her. 

Two sympathizers entered bearing a tiny chocolate cake 
with the message Happy New "fear. The family was over- 
joyed with the little bit of cake each was given. However, 
the liberator did not bring good news along with the cake. 
He told the Franks that someone had questioned him about 
the appearance of abookcase in his office. A bookcase vMch 
apparently covered the stairwell to the attic where the Franks 
were hidden. The visitor mentioned seeing a door in there 
at one time, but now that the wall was covered with a book 
case, he blackmailed the sympathizers. Terror struck the 
adults, but the children, unaware, went aside and talked of 
paintings, cats, and of being outdoors. 

This is how Anne Frank lived with her family imtil 
they were found by the Nazis. Anne was murdered at Belsen 
concentration camp at the age of 16. 

Following the Janus Players' performance of a scene 
from'"The Diary of Anne Frsuik," CCCC's Modem Dance 



Students performed the dance "Reach," a symboUc dance 
wWch portrayed the horror and the terror that so many people 
suffered during the "Holocaust." 

The dancers came to life clinging to the few posses- 
sions they were allowed to keep. In their despair they were 
packing and unpacking their clothes, opening and closing 
their suitcases, dancing towards each other for comfort, 
throwing clothes about, all without the sound of music. It 
was a dance in a silence that was overbearing. When a vio- 
lin sounded, the tone became a note of terror. 

The scene that these dancers enacted was haunting 
and realistic. Fear was written aU over the performers feces, 
their eyes questioning the whereabouts of loved ones. Si- 
lent cries came from pained expressions on wom feces. 

Six survivors of the Holocaust were present at the per- 
formance. Theywere once againreminded of the terror that 
reigned in their world fifty years ago. The rest of the audi- 
ence was silent, still, and entranced by this moving perfor- 
mance. 

Through this dance,"Reach", the observers were given 
another insight into this horrible, traumatic, inhuman part 
of history. Thus the necessity of never allowing this mas- 
sive destmction of humanity to ever happen again was rein- 
forced. 

The dance was directed by Joanne Galium Powers and 
choreographed and performed by the students of her Mod- 
em Dance class. 

The final presentation was performed by the CCCC 
chorus, who had the honor of participating in Cantor David 
Rojay's "Hamelech" during its first public performance. 
Rojay's Second Symphony in E flat major was directed by 
Dr. Robert Kidd and featured a solo by Cantor Rojay with 




CCCC dance group at Yom Hashoah. 

peace descend on us, on all Isiael, and all the world, and let 
us say: Amen. 

According to CCCC English Professor Lisa F ranklin , 
a member of the Cape Cod Congregation, this prayer, even 
though it is called the "Moumer's Kaddish," is not abouti 
death but is a reaffirmation of life and of God as the only; 
source of life. 

Adorning the lobby of the Arts Center were art works, 
contributed by Sara Ringler's Dimming I class, and poetryl 
created by Lisa Franklin's Creative Writing Class. 



"Yom Hashoa ~ For The Children" 



Wide eyed, unfulfilled progeny. 
Tender, unripe, innocent, gentle ones. 
Will you speak to us now? 

We so much wanted to say goodbye. 
And we've gone without outplay things. 

Who paid for your trip afar? 

Such rude escorts at our door, 
And they said wed go to school 

So Children, what did you learn? 

We're too young to have known so much courage. 
And bravery was our mentor. 

What are your play things now? 

Foresight, contemplation, 
Andfaith. 

For what have you been forsaken? 

Revision haunts your young. 
And our sacrifice endures. 

So then, what fruit would you bear? 

But, that truth speak. 



Mark Alan Thibodeau 



accompaniment by the chorus. Cantor Rojay's Sym- 
phony No.2 entitled "The Birthday Symphony," was origi- 
nally written in 1960-61 for the State of Israel's Bar Mitzval 
ofCaesarea, 

Director of the Prime Minister's office, Moishe Shdoh 
spoke to Rojay about music commemorating Egyptian Piesi 
dent Anwar Sadat's visit to Jerusalem in 1977. A recordinj 
of the Third Movement of Symphony No.2 was given to th( 
Pittsburgh Symphony, and presented to Prime Minister Be 
gin in Jerusalem. 

Rabbi and author Stephen Wylen helped Mr. Roja; 
set the Second Movement to a Hebrew text and titled tbi 
piece "Hamelech." In 1985 it was sung at Rosh Hashanal 
services and has been simg in various synagogues. 



Page 9 MainSheet April 14, 1994 



Council of Presidents 
established by Senate 
President 



by CAROLE DONAHUE 

Staff Writer 

The "voice" heard round the campus is as loud as the 
body of people who carry it. A Council of Presidents will 
be a goal that Senate President Thomas Edwards, Sr. will be 
initiating this semester. His mission statement is "To Have 
the student body better inforrned and allow students more 
knowledge of what a leadership role is about." 

The council will be made up of representing, presi- 
dents of all student clubs and organizations on campus. The 
piu^Kise for the council is to meet and interchange informa- 
tion about plans, activities, goals, purposes, and problems 
of each group. He hopes to collectively encourage and work 
toward enhancing each organizations success in attaining 
theii individual goals. 

Once the 24 presidents have committed to the coun- 
cil, an elected chairperson will conduct the open meetings. 
All members of the college family are encouraged to attend 
meetings. Being a commuter student body, substituting rep- 
resentatives will be expected and accepted. 

This council will "Try to pull everyone together with 
information about the nurturing self help agencies, housing 
programs, the fight against hunger, tutoring and educational 
tools and help that is available," Mr. Edwards said. 

Mr. Edwards also said, "No student should be lost from 
college because of the lack of knowledge as to v/bat is avail- 
able." The average student here at CCCC is 30.6 years old. 

"The sacrifices that have to be made by many stu- 
dents and their families to retijm to school to enrich them- 
selves are astronomical. To love something that's worth it is 
hard work, it's not easy We don't want to lose any student 
that could be helped by all the resources we have," said Mr. 
Edwards. He also says, "Informed students serve themselves, 
the college and ultimately the community better." 

The continuing adult evening classes enroll an esti- 
mated 3000 students, including 2000 in the day, says Mr. 
Edwards. He also says, "Issues concerning student rights, 
and policy changes, are hopefidly in the agenda. An ex- 
ample of an issue is the recent petition signed thus far by as 
many as 200 students." 

"The students want some justification for a three dol- 
lar technology fee they are being charged when in fact the 
current computer equipment does not even meet the course 
work load," says Mr. Edwards. 

"I'm very proud to be a part of this college and I would 
like others to feel the same," said Mr. Edwards. He also 
says, "The Coimcil of Presidents will provide one more area 
where students have a voice and representation in the as- 
pects of college life for their personal success and the suc- 
cess of the college." 

If you are interested in being a part of this council, 
please leave your name, the organization, and a phone num- 
ber with Cheryl Macedo in the Student Activities Office. 



Letters Policy 

The MainSheet welcomes letters to the editor from 
members of the CCCC community Letters may 
be dropped off at the MainSheet office in the Up- 
per Commons, or be mailed to the MainSheet, 
Cape Cod Community College, West Barnstable, 
MA. 02668. All letters must be signed and ac- 
companied by atelephone number. The MainSheet 
reserves the right to edit letters. 



The Write Stuff 

The language and literature 
department's showcase for student 
essays is seeking manuscripts for it's 
fall publication. If you 
would like to see your work 
published contact Bill 
Babner Writing Coordina- 
tor at ext. 408. 





The Bullock Brothers' Gospel Band puts on a performance In the cafeteria 
last week. 



Photo by Terri Ladd 



Smoking room controversy drags on 



BY JANA JONES 

Staff Writer 

As "no-smoking" becomes the policy of the times in 
public and private buildings around the Commonwealth, 
debate over the CCCC smoking lounge continues. Some 
students feel a designated smoking area on campus is nec- 
essary. 

Controversy over the smoking room flared earlier this 
semester when the room was closed down during the winter 
months for a brief period of time. "It wasn't very enjoyable 
standing outside," said Jason Marin. "If we can't smoke in 
here, the nonsmokers are going to complain when we stand 
directly in front of the doorways." 

Sarah Pierce, a business major, agrees that smokers 
need a designated space on campus. "We heed a place that 
belongs to us." The smoking room has become a gather- 
ing place for many students, including non-smokers. Stu- 
dents use the space to socialize and relax with friends. "I 
don't even smoke any more," added Mr. Marin, a Liberal 
Arts major, "I can meet with my friends here and I relax and 
play cards in here." 

Most of the students and teachers who use the smok- 



ing room stated that when the weather is good, they open 
the windows. In the cold winter months, or rainy days, how- 
ever, the problem is much worse. Bad weather keeps the 
windows closed and forces many students ioside to the al- 
ready overcrowded room. 

Some students are concerned that second-hand smoke 
from the smoking room affects the nonsmokers in the com- 
mon area. Many felt that it was unfair to have the smoking 
lounge up in the commons, where anyone studying in the 
next room can smell, or even taste the smoke. Many non- 
smokers said that they can smell the smoke downstairs in 
the cafeteria as well. 

Some students feel part of the problem with the smok- 
ing room is its filtering system, which they feel does not 
fimction properly. "If the overhead filtering system was 
cleaned bi-weekly the room would not smell so bad," said 
Wendy Bryant, a student here at CCCC. "The last time it 
was cleaned was about two semesters ago." 

The maintenance department reports that the system 
is cleaned every three days. However, as complaints con- 
tinue to pour in about the smoking room's presence on this 
campus, many students feel its future is in jeopardy. 



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Page 10 MalnSheet April 14, 1994 



Campus Life 



CCCC student appears on Jay Leno Show 



by LOW PERRY 
Staff writer 

This past spring break, Brian Ford, editor-in-chief of 
the MainSheet, made a short appearance em the Tonight Show 
with Jay Leno. Mr. Leno's first guest, diet and fitness ex- 
pert Richard Sinmions, invited Brian up on stage to trans- 
late a rude comment. 

In an interview with Mr. Ford, he explained the excit- 
ing details of the event. It began when Brian and a friend 
traveled to Los Angeles for spring break. On March 1 6, the 
two went to see a taping of the Tonight Show, where Richard 
Simmons was slated to appear that night. 

Richard Simmons, w^io was donned in green sham- 
rocks for St. Patrick's Day, vras asked by Leno if he spoke 
any Gaelic. Mr. Simmonsjokingly took offense and shouted 
the phrase "Puggamahone," a Gaelic insult, at Jay Leno. 
Simmons then turned to the audience and asked if anyone 
knew the phrase. "I was the only one in the audience who 



raised his hand," said Brian. 

Simmons spotted Brian's hand in the crowd and waved 
him down to the stage to sit next to the two on the set. After 
a few sarcastic comments from Jay Leno, Brian revealed the 
meaning of "Puggamahone," which means, "kiss my *ss." 

"Leno just ragged on me for a few minutes," Brian 
said. "When I sat down on the couch, he told Richard 
Simmons that this was his audfence and not a dating ser- 
vice. Then I shook hands with Richard and went back to my 
seat. The whole thing was pretty strange," said Brian. 
To clear up any rumors, Brian insists that it was the Jay 
LenoshowandnotDavidLettermanorOprah Winfrey "And 
no, I don't have a thing going with Richard Simmons ei- 
ther," he added. "Why did it have to be Richard Simmons 
and not Cindy Crawford?" 

By the way, if you missed the show, "...you'll prob- 
ably see it as a rerun this summer or something. Just don't 
make fim of me about it." 




Ma/nSh**f Editor In Chief, Brian Ford. 

photo br r«tf Lmdd 



Chorus has a strong voice after 21 years 



By CAROLE J. DONAHUE 

Staff Writer 

If you can't sing in the shower it doesn't 
matter, the Cape Cod Community College Cho- 
rus wants to hear from you. The quality of your 
voice is accepted. If you have had voice expe- 
rience or feel you have a natural talent, you may 
audition for the select choir. 

Don't be concerned with the thought of 
wearing a white robe. There are none. Black 
and white shirts and skirts are the attire. This 
attire sets the visual stage for the elegant and 
cultural experience performed by the chorus. 

"There is an awfiil lot of responsibility to 
the chorus as a whole," said Diane Beal, Presi- 
dent of the chorus club. To maintain the chorus 
at the prestigious level it has today, students have 
to be dedicated. The education preparation and rehearsing 
required to sustain their quality takes hours of perseverance. 

The CCCC chorus was the only community college to 
attend the first "Choral Festival" at Bridgewater State Col- 
lege. The festival is a university level event. "There is a 
very close bonding of the people in the chorus; if someone 
is not doing their part to be the best they can be by rehears- 
ing, it will bring down that section of chorus," Ms. Beal 
said. 

"Voice lessens are also offered" said Ryan Parker, Mce- 
President of the club. "You begin to eat, sleep and think 
music" he said. Personalized voice tapes are made with the 
help of Fred Drifineyer assistant director. 

In the last 21 years the chorus headed by Dr. Robert 




CCCC Community College Chorus. 

Kidd, has travelled as far as Europe. Most funding for these 
trips were supplied by the students. The chorus has sung in 
such noted places as Notre Dame Cathedral. Students 
through the years of 1 977- 1993 have performed and speared 
on a local television station. 

"They are known all over New England within the 
choral and music association" said Dr. Kidd. 

Many music students also participate with the perform- 
ing arts groups "We support each other," Ms. Beal said. 

You have heard of the Magical Mystery Tour but have 
you heard or experienced the Madrigal Holiday Feast? The 
chorus club and students from the Art Department trans- 
form the school cafeteria into a replica of a ISth century 
castle. The combined imagination and skills from the stu- 



dents in all areas of the music and arts create 
a great banquet hall. 

The ambiance is of the Renaissance pe- 
riod. The chorus with the accompaniment 
of the Collegium Musicum, court jesters, 
readings, entertain, while you the guests en- 
joy a feast fit for a king. 

President Kraus asked the chorus to per- 
form at school commencement this year. 
They also performed last year. "We are very 
proud and honored" said Mr. Parker. Din- 
ner Concerts, the Brown Bag Luncheons, 
observances, and holiday concerts are a few 
of the other functions the chorus is involved 
in. Their talent is as abundant as the diver- 
sity of these students. David Rojay, a com- 
poser wiio wrote " The Birthday Symphony" 
> performed solo for the chorus at the obser- 
vance of Ybm Hashoah. 

The chorus also sings music of several foreign lan- 
guages including Latin, German, Hebrew, Italian and a na- 
tive tongue of Africa. Education and music appreciation 
from the eras of Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic, Classical 
and Popular are all part of the chorus program. 

The chorus is constantly revitalizing worlds of music 
and woric relentlessly. The students love for music gener- 
ates an atmosphere of unity within the group, it has to be 
witnessed to be felt. The combination of these qualities are 
probably «4iat create such excellence. 

The CCCC Chorus will be performing again during the 
Arts Festival on May 7th. 



CCCC sports a dying breed 

Once a strong progrom, sports at CCCC becomes victim of times 



By RICH WEATHERS 

Special writer 

This March UMass and Boston College crashed the 
big dance in college basketball 'M^iile Boston University and 
Harvard fought for the championship in college hockey. At 
CCCC, fourteen sweaty guys lined up at the foul line and 
the water fountain between pick up games. 

The last team from CCCC to belong to the National 
Junior College Athletic Association was men's soccer back 
in 1988. Since then, the athletic program at CCCC has been 
reduced to two dub sports and open gym time. The only 
reason the crew and lacrosse teams exist is through monies 
from the Student Activities Fund and self financing. 

Financial cut-backs ultimately killed intercollegiate 
sports at CCCC, but lack of student interest and commit- 
ment were the true reasons for ending the fimding for the 
schools varsity teams. This according to Barbara Fitzpatrick, 
Acting Head of the Department of Health and Human Ser- 
vices and former coach of many of the varsity teams at 
CCCC. 

Mrs. Fitzpatrick remembers a time in the 1970s when 
the "gym was filled" for some men's basketball games and 
one year w4ien the hockey team went to the junior college 
nationals and placed fourth. The tennis team she coached 
sent two of its members to the nationals, as well, in 1975. 



So why are CCCC students cheering on other Massa- 
chusetts colleges athletic teams instead of their own? Mrs. 
Fitzpatrick blames a change in the demogr^hics of the 
school for the lack of student participation. "The average 
student age has gone from 18-20 years to about 30 years," 
Mrs. Fitzpatrick said, "and a lot of students have to wtnk." 

The crew team has found a way to get around its stu- 
dents work schedules by having practices as early as 6:30 
a.m.. Julie Biggs, a member of the crew team, works fiill 
time and takes three classes. She says that, if the practices 
weren't in the morning and on the weekends, she could not 
even think about participating in a school sport. 

The fact that some students are here for only one oi 
tvw) semesters is also a problem. Dick Sommeis, the feculty 
advisor for die Lacrosse team, has had trouble with this in 
the two years since he started trying to get the Lacrosse Club 
established. He says, "There is no lack of interest" He just 
cannot get enough bodies to show up on a consistent basis. 

There is desire among those who are active in the clubs; 
there has to be because of the lack of financial support. 
CCCC's Lacrosse Club has purchased some equipment, but 
most team members bring vibat they have and share. The 
Lacrosse Club's President, Lucas Provost recalls driving past 
Sandwich High School and feeling "jealous" of the players 
because they were "decked out in their uniforms." 



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Page 11 MalnSheet Aprfr 14, 1994 



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Interested In beefing up your resume? 
Want to see your name In print? 

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Journalism I when you pre-register for spring. We are 
loctong for Wght, energetic, talented people to be Kpott- 
ers,photographeTS, darkroom technicians, advertisers,lay- 
<mtand graphic artists for the MainSheet, CCCC sfudfent 
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Join us and gain not only job experience and academic 
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homeawayfrcHnhome. Weliopeto$eeyoujoiiitateawatd> 
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Fall Schedule 1994 



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While earning an associate's degree at Cape Cod 
Community College, you can use "ARTSYS" to fast forward 
toward your next goal: a bachelor's degree at Bridgewater State 
College. ARTSYS is a computer software program that's been 
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Planning your course of studies at Cape Cod Community 
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Page 15 MainSheet April 14, 1994 



WESTERN NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE 

IS ON CAPE COD! 




Western New England College has of- 
fered courses leading to a variety of de- 
grees on Cape Cod for over 10 years! 

Western New England College gradu- 
ates from Cape Cod earned their de- 
grees on Cape Cod without crossing the 
bridge! 



Yes, Cape Cod residents have been able and are 
still able to earn a 4-year degree right here in 
Cape Cod without crossing that infamous 
bridge 



you benefit from out delivery system because: 

Our tuition is only $354 per 3 credit undergraduate course 

We have 6 convenient locations on Cape Cod and 1 in Plymouth 

Courses are day and evening 

And, there are 5 terms per year allowing for a more rapid attainment 
of your 4-year degree 



For more information contact our full time perma- 
nent office at 3179 Main Street in Barnstable. 
Our phone number is 362-4936 



Western New England College is an equal opportunity organization. 



Back Page 



student Survey: 

What would you change about the world? 




Drew Lonergan 
Criminal Justice 

"The government should pro- 
vide a loan for students and be 
paid in return by some kind of 
community service." 




Dawn King 
Liberal Arts 

"I would change world hunger, 
because if people are properly 
nourishe4 they would be more 
productive and self-sufficient." 



Stephen Penlington 
Criminal Justice 

"Negative views, because they 
lead to procrastination 
and stagnation." 



Cheri McAdams 
Psychology/Arts 

" I would like to make all needs 
affordable for everyone." 



Michael Singleton 
Pre-Chiropractic 

" Stereotypes. Everyone de- 
serves an equal chance." 



Tiiden Arts Festival 

Saturday, May 7, 1994, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
To reserve a free table, contact Bob McDonald at 
362-21 31 , ext. 41 7, or Sara Ringler at ext. 355. Tables 
will be given on a first come first serve basis, so 

make your reservations earlyl 



Ethnic Diversity continued from page. 



"The reason they jumped me was because I was white, 
I thought I vras going to die because of it. That feeling 
lasted for five minutes for one night, I can not imagine feel- 
ing like that everyday." 

"I do not hold all black people at fault for this attack, 
but some white people do. I also do not think all vAaXe 
people are responsible for racism, but some blacks do." 

"If this type of thinking does not change soon we are 
all going to be in big trouble." 

Ms. Carlson-Greene said the source of the problem is that 
the campus is simply not diverse enough. Figures from the 
Registrar's office support her statement. For the spring 1 994 
semester 3772 students are enrolled at CCCC. Of those, a 
total of 162 are minorities, this includes Asian, American 
Indian, Black, Hispanic and C^)e Verdean. 

The Ethnic Diversity Club is planning an open forum to 
be held at the end of this semester to discuss racial prob- 
lems. Administrators, faculty and invited guests will speak 
at the meeting. 



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April 28, 1994 '■^^■^-JU BH^S! Cape Cod Community College, West Barnstable, MA Distributed FREE 



IssueNo. 11, Volume XVII 




Prof. Robert McDonald looks on as Lucas Provost, Hannah Hilliard and Joan Lamminen make buttons 
for the Tilden Arts Festival. The festival kicks off on Thursday May, 5 and runs through Sunday the 7. See 
page five for the schedule for f riday and Saturday events. Photo by Terri Ladd 

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS - TILDEN ARTS CENTER 

Thursday 

1 2:30 p.m. "From The Interior. . ." — Performance readings of monologues by 

Oral Interpretation of Literature Class students and Speech Arts 
Club members. (Studio Theatre) 

1:00 Gala Opening Parade through the campus. 

2:00 Computer Graphics Worl<shop with Bill Young - Arts Center 

2:00 Outdoor Chalk Drawings by Painting and Graphic Design Students 

assisted by Robert McDonald and Ginny Just. 

2:00 The "Collegium Musicum" - A performance of Renaissance Dance 

Music (Arts Lobby)' 

2:00 "Improv Anonymous" - various improvisational sl<its performed by 

members of the Rehearsal and Performance Class. Some optional 
audience participation is involved. (Outside commons building) 

3:00' Dan McCullough - readings (Studio Theatre) 

7:00 Royall Noyse - Renaissance Music (Arts Lobby) 



AND 



Dean of Academic 
Affairs accepts 
position in Texas 

by Rich Weathers 

Staff Writer 

The current Dean of Academic Affairs, Dr. Hosni Nabi, 
may be brandishing spurs and a ten gallon hat starting next 
semester. He has accepted the position of Executive Vice 
Presideht of Academic Affairs 
at Austin Community College 
in Austin, Texas. 

In a phone interview, Dr. 
Hosni Nabi, who was instru- 
mental in establishing the 
Physical Therapy Assistant Pro- 
gram in the Health and Himian 
Services Department, said that 
he enjoyed his four years at 
CCCC, but is looking forward 
to working in a state that is 
more supportive of its schools. Dean Nabi worked in Texas 
before he came to Cape Cod and remembers a system that 
was more dedicated, at least financially, to higher educa- 
tion. 

Despite budget cuts that have crippled Massachusetts 
state colleges. Dean Nabi said he was able to expand upon 
and improve the quality of classes here with the help of a 
willing faculty and a cooperative administration. He said 
that he will miss these people, his friends and colleagues, 
the most. 

In a press release. President Richard A. Kraus said, 
"While Dean Nabi will be misse4 the fact that he was sought 
for a position of such increased responsibility is a reflection 
on the good judgment displayed by the CCCC Trustees in 
hiring him." Dean Nabi received the new job offer after a 
nation wide hunt by Austin Community College. 

26,000 students are enrolled at Austin Community 
College. Deah Nabi is looking forward to "helping the stu- 
dents" by creating a better learning atmosphere. He also 
hopes to improve the college by providing a focus for the 
faculty in order to facilitate a quality education. 




On Thursday Roy Staab, working with student assistants, will construct a sculpture 
on the campus using materials gathered from nature. Besides this work, Staab has 
made works in many other states and Europe. He currently lives and works in 
Provincetown. ' __^_^^____^^^,^^__^^^^^^^^^^___ 



Decn Hosni Nabi 



NoMore"F's!" 



Developmental Grading Policy Changes Discussed 



by MIKE TORRE 

Staff Writer 

Students may soon find the "F' a thing of the past. A new 
pohcy change could eliminate F grades and change the ex- 
isting policy concerning the R grades in developmental 
courses. 

Many students taking developmental courses have ex- 
pressed concern over the fairness of the current policy. 
Margie Trovato, a student in the Women-in-Transition pro- 
gram, said if an "F' counts toward her grade point average 
then so should any other grade. It's unfair, Ms. Trovato said,"A 
93 average doesn't count, but a 69 does." 

The Academic Policy and Standards Committee(APSC) 
has been reviewing the fairness involved in the F and R 
grades. 

According to the existing policy in the Academic Policies 
manual(APM) concerning developmental courses, the 
A,B,C,R and P grades do not calculate into a student's grade 
point average while F grades do. 

Also under review is the criteria regarding the distribut- 
ing of R grades.' 

The APM states, "The R Grade indicates that a student 
has made satisfactory progress but needs to repeat the course 
to meet the required proficiency level." 



The concerns of the APSC have been: 
—that the term "satisfactory progress" is vague 
—that the R grade is used as a substitute for an "F' 
-that the philosophy of many instructors regarding devel- 
opmental courses is the grade given should not have pimi- 
tive ramifications. 

In a memo to the APSC, Bruce Bell Associate Dean of 
Arts and Sciences sai4 "The R grade was intended for stu- 
dents in developmental courses whose learning styles would 
not allow them to complete the course in one semester." He 
added that if a student has attended class for the entire se- 
mester and has made satisfactory progress but has not been 
able to complete all the work by semesters end that student 
should receive an R grade. 

Professor Kathleen Bent, Chair of APSC, said the new 
policy should be broad enough to allow professors academic 
fi-eedom, but clear enough so the intent of the policy is clear. 
"Now satisfactory progress is being interpreted in many dif- 
ferent ways," Professor Bent said. 

She said the R grade shows that a student worked and 
progressed but not enough, she added "Students interpret 
the F grade as a failure instead of the simple fact that the 
course was not successfully completed." Professor Bent 
pointed out that a student can always repeat a course and 
wipe the F grade off their record." 



Inside: 




Campus News 

Project Forward 


Pg.3 


Features Pg. 8 

7 Seas provides quality care for children of students 


Entertainment 

Kurt Cobain conunits suicide 


Pg.6 


Features 

Staying safe in the 90s 


Pg. 9 


Breaking the Boundries 

Animal rights Pg. 7 


Bacic Page 

■ Date rape: confixsion and controversy 


Pg. 12 



Page 2 MainSheet April 28, 1994 



Campus News 



Local businessman tells rags to riches story 




Businessman Stephen Bernard 

By SUE CELLI 

Staff writer 



photo by Teni Ladd 



"Success starts today," is what the founder of the Cape 
Cod Potato Chip Compatiy Stephen Bernard said to students 
on campus when he gave a seminar last week about "Grow- 
ing a Business." There are four basic keys to success, he said, 
and if people apply these rules, they can' be successful at 
almost anything. 



Success entails a few key points, according to Bernard. 
Persistence, a positive attitude, hard work, and enjoyment in 
what you are trying to accomplish. He captured the interest 
of the audience with the story of how his company rose out of 
the ashes of near disaster to the booming business that it is 
today. 

His chip company was almost out of business and very 
low on money, and he was about ready to call it quits. Then 
his luck got even worse, or so he thought. An unfortunate 
accident occurred, an elderly man crashed through the front 
of his store, and he thought that all was lost. Then, about a 
week later an insurance check rolled in for approximately 
$1000. He decided to use the-money to pick up the pieces. 

He repaired the damages and bought new supplies. He 
had a good quahty product and gave it the publicity it needed 
to get it off the groimd. 

The road to success for Stephen Bernard was a long 
one. He had four other companies, including an auto supply 
business, before he hit the jackpot with viiat is now the Cape 
Cod Potato Chip Company. 

After his speech which was fiill of personal, inspira- 
tional stories and amusmg anecdotes, Bernard took a few 
questions firom the audience. 

One member of the audience said, in a world of what 
seems to be endless disaster, it was good to hear a uplifting 
story. 

Mr. Bernard left the audience with this thought: The 
moral of this story is, don't quit, and don't ever give up. 



Testing 1'2-P 

Meyers-Briggs test can help plan future 



by CAROLE DONAHUE 

Staff Writer 

The Meyers-Briggs IVpe Indicator will probably be the 
only test you'll ever take that you don't cram for, lose sleep 
over, or even open a book for. 

Meyers-Briggs is easy, fim, and brief. It takes about a 
half hour. The results have the characteristics of an astrol- 
ogy reading. They are all about you! You simply state your 
preferences to 100 different questions. The test explores 
four categories; Where you focus your attention [E-I], how 
you look at things [S-N], how you go about doing tliings[T- 
F] and how you deal with outside influences[J-P] . There are 
two opposite personality types, extrovert[E] or introvert[I]. 

This report answers some of those questions even amother 
couldn't tell about her child, such as viiiy they do the things 
they do. Sensing S, Thinking T, Judging J, Intuition I, to- 
gether with Feeling F, Perceiving P, are the personality types. 
There are sixteen possible types, the combination of these 
preferences are determined by your answers to the questions. 



Your total type score is not a number grade, as we know 
it, but rather a letter grade such as ENFP! There is a num- 
ber preference score which shows you how consistently you 
choose one preference over the other. 

Deciphering some of the different interests and values we 
have helps us to understand the career choices, relationships, 
and work behaviors that best suit our particular needs. 

Mr.Dougherty in the CCCC counseling office is the man 
who is available to help sort it all out. He has been analyz- 
ing these tests for 12 years. 

According to Mr. Dougherty, thinking personalities are 
more methodical less apt to be spontaneous, sensing people 
are more carefree and undisciplined to a degree, so the bal- 
ance of the two might be a good combination. Mr.Dougherty 
explained there is no right or wrong, simply personal pref- 
erences. 

Meyers-Briggs testing is another educational tool. It 
may alleviate some anxieties or make you aware that quali- 
ties you may think are not important are your assets. Try it, 
you'll like it. 



Pulitzer Prize winner to read poetry in Arts 
Center next October 



by SHEILA JOHNSON 

Special Writer 

Gwendolyn Brooks, the Pulitzer Prize winning poet, 
will give a reading in the Tilden Arts Center on 
Wednesday October 12, at 8 p.m.. The often antholo- 
gized author of 21 books wiU also meet with students 
to discuss her writing the next day, said Professor Bill 
Babner, CCCC Writing Coordinator. 

The event is sponsored by a joint effort of the Pro- 
fessional Life and Development Committee and the 
Cultural Affairs Committee. Ms. Brooks reading will 
be free to students and $5 for members of the commu- 
nity. 

"She has long been a great poet and spokesperson 
for the Black Community," said Professor Babner, "We 
are fortimate and excited to have her appear here." 

Some of her books include Blacks and Beckonings 
along with the poems The Boy Died in My Alley and 
What Shall I Give My Children. 




CDL Study Program Offered 

A six-week Commercial Drivers' License study pro- 
gram to prepare drivers for the written portion of the 
General Knowledge and Endorsement Tests will be of- 
fered at CCCC's Adult Learning Center at 540 Main 
Street in Hyaimis starting May 9. Classes run Mon- 
days from 6 to 8 p.m. except on May 30. Registration : 
is available daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Center. 
Check, money order or charge card may be used to cover 
the $47 tuition. Required textbooks must be purchased 
at CCCC's bookstore before the first class. The class 
requires a minimum of eight people. For more infor- 
mation, contact the instructor, Verlyne Ryan-Eanniello 
at 362-2131, ext. 478 or at the Adult Learning Center 
at 778-2221. ' 

'Exploring EXCEL' Course Offered 

A new course, Exploring EXCEL, will run on two 
Wednesday evenings starting May 4 at CCCC 's Hyannis 
Campus at 540 Main Street. The class meets from 6 to 
9 p.m. May 4 and 1 1 with tuition at $50. The funda- 
mentals of spread sheet operation using EXCEL in the 
Windows environment will be presented. For further 
information and registration, visit CCCC's downtown 
Hyaimis Campus/Adult Learning Center or call 778- 
2221. 

Red Cross Announces 1994 Aquatic 
School 

The American Red Cross will offer a one week training 
school for anyone interested in a job as a lifeguard or 
swimming instructor. This one week school, held from 
June 3-10 on Cape Cod vwlll offer the following Red 
Cross courses: Water Safety Instructor, Lifeguarding, 
Lifeguard Instructor Training, CPR, First Aid and Small 
Craft courses, including Sailing Instructor. Students 
will receive Red Cross training based on nationally de- 
veloped curricula, using state-of-the-art course materi- 
als. Pre-registration for Aquatic School is required and 
early registration is reconunended. For more informa- 
tion, call the American Red Cross of Massachusetts Bay 
at 1(800) 564-1234, ext. 270 MICHAEL. 

Investment Class Offered at Hyannis 
Campus 

A Trusts, Wills, Mutual Funds and Tax Free Bonds class 
will be offered by CCCC on Saturday morning, May 21 
at its Hyannis Campus at 540 Main Street. The class 
will cover estate planning and what investments best 
fit those goals. Active class participation will be en- 
couraged. The sessions run from 9 a.m. till noon. To 
register or receive more information, call 778-2221 or 
visit CCCC's Hyannis Campus. 

CCCC Choral Concert 

The 33-voice CCCC Chorus will present its spring con- 
cert as the finale of the Tilden Arts Festival Saturday, 
May 7 at 8 p.m. in the Student Commons cafeteria. 
Buttons available at the college box office for $5 will 
guarantee admission to all events during the three day 
festival including the concert. 

Homophobia Workshop 

The Gay, Bi, Lesbian Club is sponsoring a homophobia 
workshop May 3 from 12:30 to 1:30 in Lecture Hall A. 
The workshop will discuss how homophobia affects het- 
erosexual people. All students are encouraged to 
attend. 



Pulitzer Prize winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks 



Craigville Pizza & 
Mexican 



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SI.OO oK 
any large pizza ^rith this coupon 

4 Barlcws Landing Rd. Pocasaet 564-6306 
618 Craigville Beach Rd. W. Hyannisport77S4Z67 
^ y 



Campus Life 



Page 3 MainSheet April 28, 1994 




Far Right: Chef Marian 
IMartin and Project For- 
ward Student Stacey Cook 
practice culinary arts. 
Above: Project Forward 
Students, Nina Oshinsl<y 
and John Colloton, are 
studying office technol- 
ogy. Right: Jill Connell 
and Heather NacNeill ar,e 
studying elder care. 



Photos by Debbie Etsten 





Project Forward students enrich college community 



by lORI PERRY 

Staff Writer 

High school graduates with moderate to severe learn- 
ing disorders can learn new skills, enter the workforce and 
get better jobs through a program at the college called ProJ ect 
Forward. 

For the past six years, Project Forwar4 a program es- 
tablished to help students with severe learning disorders 
become more independent, has helped students vrork to- 
wards becoming self-supporting while contributing to the 
college and the community as well. 

Students who participate in this program have helped 
maintain school grotmds, repair worn tables and chairs, ca- 
ter campus events, and complete volunteer work with the 
elderly in local nursing homes. 

The program is a two-year, non-degree, vocational 
skills training program providing instruction in the areas of 
basic groimdskeeping and maintenance, modem office tech- 
nology, basic food preparation, and care of the elderly. 

'Students who participate in 
ttiis program tiave helped 
maintain school grounds, 
repair worn tables and chairs, 
cater campus events, and 
complete volunteer work with 
the elderly in local nursing 
homes. ' 

Project Forward also offers courses in general vocational 
skills and independent living skills. 

"The main goal of the program is employment of the 
students," said Gretchen Famum, Project Forward's Facili- 
ties Use Coordinator. "About 30 percent of the students 
come from high schools in the Cape Community, but most 
of our students come from a Riverview School Program in 



Sandwich dealing with severe learning disorders." The 
students meet Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday each week 
from 3-5 p.m. Jill Canaille, a student in Elder Care, com- 
ments on the importance of breaks in their instruction. She 
smiles while another student practices taking her blood pres- 
sure and adds, "Another favorite part of class is on Thurs- 
day when we (the Elder Care group) visit The Manor." 

Elder Care students spend Tuesday and Wednesday 
practicing various nursing skills, and go to the Cape Cod 
Extended Care Facility. The students are responsible for 
planning different recreational activities for the elderly rang- 
ing from bowling to playing cards. 

Heather MacNeill, a first year student said, "My fa- 
vorite part is meeting new people and spending time with 
them. Tomorrow we'll be finger painting with the elderly." 
She also explains how they sometimes paint with sponges 
because many elderly people have frouble holding on to 
something smaller like a paintbrush. 

In CG 1 1, a simulated professional kitchen, students 
studying Basic Food Preparation prepare everything from 
sandwiches and cookies to layer cakes and roasted chicken. 
The food produced by these students goes to various 
groups on campus. Last Wednesday they catered the 
UMASS Jazz Band concert at CCCC. 

Ardie Card, a second semester student, said, "I like ihe 
hands-on experience in the kitchen and making new friends. 
My specialties are cupcakes and chocolate chip cookies and 
I'd like to work in a bakery after I graduate." 

Gina Pescosolido, another second semester student, 
describes a typical day in class. "We split up into groups 
and work on different foods." Ms. Pescosolido, who is cap- 
tain of her group, also commented on the difficulty of wear- 
ing a hearing aid and how she has learned to deal with the 
noise level in the kitchen. "Sometimes it gets pretty noisy in 
here with all the groups working on different projects, so I 
just tiun my hearing aid down." 

Most second-year Modem Office Technology students 
are putting their knowledge to work through six-week long 
practicums. Some of Colleen Long's work includes filing 



for the Daytime Nurses, and creating labels on WordPerfect. 
John CoUoton, a second semester Modem Office Tech- 
nology student, is also taking a course in English. "Some of 
the work is tough, but it's fim. In the future, I would like to 

'Elder Care students spend 
Tuesday and Wednesday 
practicing various nursing skills, 
and go to the Cape Cod 
Extended Care Facility, The 
students are responsible for 
planning different recreational 
activities for the elderly ranging 
from bowling to playing cards.' 



work in an office setting where I can utilize my skills and 
meet new people." 

Others in the course, like Nina Oshinsky and Matt Paul, 
look forward to furthering their education at other colleges. 

Out of the 38 students currently enrolled in the pro- 
gram, 14 are in their fourth semester and graduating this 
June. 

Project Forward Coordinator John Beach comments on 
the success of the program, but stresses a need for more vol- 
unteer internships for the students. "Many of our graduates 
are working in day care centers and nursing homes, and some 
do data entry work while others entered into the cuUnary arts 
field." 

Enterprise, states that after four years, 85 percent of the 
graduates are working and 71 percent are better employed 
now than before they graduated. 

Cape Cod is unique to have Project Forward because 
there are less than two dozen of these programs in the United 
States. 



Page 4 MainSheet April 28, 1994 



Opinion 



\\ 



Letters to the Editor 

Student calls for a course on AIDS 



To the Editor: 

Recently I participated in a group presentation on AIDS 
for my course in Oral Communications. My group decided 
to outline what we felt were the major points about AIDS. 
One of the points we chose to research was the emotional 
aspects people with AIDS face. No one wanted to do this 
portion of the project, so I did. I had an extremely difficult 
time finding research on this aspect: the information I looked 
into did not give me the true feelings people with AIDS 
have. 

Another student in my class overheard my group dis- 
cussing our topic and offered to introduce me to a friend of 
hers who is HIV positive. I took advantage of her offer and 
was able to meet with her ftiend, wiio has now become my 
friend. His name is Dave. I found Dave to be very inspir- 
ing and informative. His courage has inspired me to want 
to know more about this rapidly growing disease and how I 
can get involved. I have taken the time to educate myself 
more about AIDS, and the more I read the more I want to 
know. I have overwhelmed myself with information. 

Before I met Dave I thought I knew everything I needed 
to know about AIDS. Now that I have expanded my knowl- 
edge, I realize how ignorant I really was and still am about 
this disease. What do we know about AIDS? If you are HTV 
positive, do you realize what changes need to be made? Some 
of you already may know the answers to these questions but 



that is not even a fraction of what can actually be learned. 
The college offers a number of medical courses, and I am 
stu-e that AIDS is discussed but not all of it. At some point 
throughout your career you are going to come across pa- 
tients who are HIV positive or have AIDS. These people 
will be coming to you for your knowledge on this topic. 
Will you be able to help them? Can you answer their ques- 

'As sad as it may be, AIDS is 
everywhere. Throughout all of 
our lives, at some point we will 
have to deal with this epi- 
demic. Whether it be a rela- 
tive, friend or even yourself.' 

tions on wbai prescriptions they should be taking? Probably 
not, unless the organization you are employed by requires 
you to take a coxuse elsewhere. 'Vbu would not have to take 
an'Bxtra coiu'se if the course was offered at CCCC. 

Psychiatry courses should have this knowledge also. What 
would you do if a client walked in and needed your services 
to deal with the feet that they tested HIV positive? Would 
you be able to counsel them? If not, the opportunity to make 



a difference in one or even a million people lives. Even 
students w^ose major has nothing to do with the medical 
field should be educated on this too. 

As sad as it may be, AIDS is everywhere. Throughout all 
of our lives, at some point we will have to deal with this 
epidemic. Whether it be a relative, friend or even yourself. 
Wouldn't be nice if we could learn \«4iat our generation and " 
our children's generation is up against and \^ial we can do 
to prevent if from occurring in our lives. 

Other colleges are beginning to put an AIDS course into 
effect. StonehiU college in Easton win be offering a course 
on AIDS in the fall of 1994 and 13S students are already 
enrolled. What makes our school so different from any 
other? 

This is a horrifying disease that many people do not want 
to fece and because of this the ignorance towards this dis- 
ease is insurmountable. There is no cure for AIDS, the 
only hope is education. 

David Bohannon, Sue Luscomee along witti the Cape Cod 
AIDS Council, support these measures and others Uke it to 
help educate people. 

Sincerely, 

Ingtid Lofgren, Liberal Arts M^or 



Students need the right tools for registration 



To the editor: 

About 10 years ago, I audited a course in the Russian 
novel at the Harvard Extension school in Cambridge. At 
that time, I had no plans for returning to school, I took 
this course purely for the fim of it. Yet even though I 
gave Harvard no indication that I planned to study fur- 
ther they sent me catalogues from the extension school 
for the next three years. 

They must have thought if I perused one of their books 
I might be tempted to audit another course or that maybe 
one of my friends would pick up the book and decide 
they too might go to school. Whatever the reason, the 
fact I had once spent 300 odd dollars seemed to gain me 
some creditability and respect with the school. 

The catalogues listed all available courses, the costs, 
the instructors, any pre-requisites, and gave a short sum- 
mary as to what would be covered and how. Consequently 
anyone interested in making an intelligent informed de- 
cision had the data to do so. 

Also, in the past I have either written or called a num- 
ber of other schools and asked them to send me their 
catalogues. On every occasion I received one within a 
week. Well enough ahead of schedule to give me plenty 
of time in deciding if I wanted to register or not. 



All of you, I'm sure, are aware of the fact that April 26th 
is pre-registration day. We have all received our little no- 
tices in the mail with the name of our advisor and a recom- 
mendation that we consult with him or her before the faith- 
fiilday. 

My question here is-do I select my own courses or is that 
the job of my advisor? At the moment I see no reason at all 
to consult anyone at all. AU I have seen thus fer is a 14 page 
list written in microixint fron which evidently, I'm supposed 
to select the next semesters courses from. Excuse me while 
I get my magnifying glass. 

Is this serious? Am I missing something here? Are we 
really meant to make selections on this basis? Please cor- 
rect me if I'm wrong— but this is a college is it not? Is it not 
allegedly full of people preparing themselves for their fu- 
ture? Are we not making decisions that will stay with us for 
the rest of our lives? 

Would you sign a contract without reading it? Would you 
buy a house or a car without seeing it?— Or are we letuming 
to the times of arranged marriages? 

This week I've been to the campus library, the Adult Re- 
entry office, and to the counseling office across from regis- 
tration. Between the three, theyhadagrand total oftwo old 
catalogues from 1993-1994. Neither copy allowed to leave 
die sig^t of the secretary or librarian. 



I hoped to have an idea of -uliat I wanted by the time it 
came to see my advisor, but at this point it seems quiet 
unlikely. Maybe 111 just leave a little note on her door- 
"Dear Advisor: please make me out a schedule and send 
it to the Registrar's office. See you all in the fall." 

1 look at this wad of scarcely readable paper and can- 
not believe I'm supposed to make such important deci- 
sion based on it 

I have an Oral Communications course where the pro- 
fessor maiks down the grade for typos on written out- 
lines. According to him, when I get out into the cold, 
cruel world of reality such things shall prove of great 
importance. I get the impression he believes that these 
seeming small things shall serve as signposts of my pro- 
fessionalism, that they are Uttle flags waving in the wind 
saying, "Hey look at me, I'm educated!" 

I know if students miss a deadline, if an assignment is 
passed in late, they may easily fmd themselves flunking 
a course. 

I fliink fliis "professionalism" should swing both ways, 
I think the students of this college deserve the tools to 
make the decisions that may effect the rest of their lives. 

Signed, 
Michael Torre 



Student expresses gratitude 

To the Editor: 

"Nash, you...are... a.. .zombie!" 

I have never forgotten those words, spat at me in an- 
ger by my math teacher when I was in high school. I hated 
school, and lived in fear of the teachers •viho only seemed to 
smile and be civil to the 'clever' students. Encourage- 
ment at home was not forthcoming either, a fact which only 
cemented my feelings not to expect too much from myself 
or my education — 1 was a girl, after all. 

According to my father, education for women should 
be basic and minimal, and so college for me was most defi- 
nitely not an option whilst my two brothers went on to enjoy 
college life. My father, patriarch personified, had always 
felt that college was no place for women. It had something 
to do with their not being as smart as men, and his feeling 
that their life's ambition should be to get married, have chil- 
dren, and live happily ever after. 

My father is, I'm sure, a product of his own upbring- 
ing. After all, his wife, mother, grandmother, ad infinitum, 
all acquiesced to the role expected of them. It's a family 



tradition so to speak. Thus, I continued to live my life ac- 
cording to my father's expectations even though, deep down 
inside, I knew I wanted more. 

During subsequent years I married, had four children, 
and settled down to life within 'the white picket fence.' 
Restless with a desire for something else, I ptmctuated those 
years with various jobs: selling insurance, marketing real 
estate, starting my own jewelry business, etc., but nothing 
really fiilfilled me. 

It wasn't until the spring of '9 1 that something stined 
from within that was to quell the insecurity I had always 
carried with me. I had signed up for a computer course at 
CCCC in order to enable me to use my new computer for 
keeping my household matters in order. I enjoyed that course 
so much, and came away with a B. I also came away armed 
with a growing confidence 1 had never felt before, and with 
much trepidation, signed up for the fall semester as a full 
time student. 

After two years at CCCC, 1 earned my Associates De- 
gree with high honors. Not bad for someone wiio thought 
they weren't college material. I have been accepted by both 
Tufts University and Wellesley College for the fall semes- 
ter. I plan to continue my education, and graduate with a 



MSW and possibly a Doctorate in Psychology. 

When I think back to that teacher wlio referred to n» 
as a zombie and how afraid I was of school, and then I think 
of my experience at CCCC and the very special people w*o 
have shown me vtliat real teaching is all about, I know that 1 
am not, and never was, a zombie. 

The responsibility of an educator is not to be takoi 
lightly; for in their hands a good teacher holds the ability to 
impart not only knowledge, but also a sense of worth. Teactt- 
ers must imbue their students with confidence, and instill in 
them a hunger to learn more, not scare them and rob theni 
of their self esteem. 

My success could not have been possible without the 
help of some very, very special and inspiring teachers whom 
I wish to thank from the bottom of my heart. Thank you 
Helen Goolishian, Gary Getchell, Dan McCullough, Geoigi 
Hoar, Sally Polito, Brenda Boleyn, Eben Johnson, Christinl 
Esperson, Barry McPhee, Phillis Lee, Randy Bartlett, Can 
Beale, and Jim Silverman. 

Gratefiilly, 

Angela (Nash) Hennemuth 



Page 5 MainSheet April 28, 1994 



Features 







Tilden Arts Festival ^94 

Spring Arts Festival is here again 



CAPE COD COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE & PERFORMING ARTS 
presents 



by AMY PAINE GOLD 

Features Editor 

Starting off the Tilden Arts Festival this year will be a 
gala festive parade. Everyone is invited to be in the parade 
along with the art, dance, music and theater classes. The 
day care center students will be parading and performing 
too. You can make your own mask, dress up in costume, or 
use that creative imagination of yours and think of some- 
thing wild. The parade is Thursday, May 5, from 12:30 - 
2:00 p.m. 

The theme for this years Arts Festival at CCCC is the art- 
ist within. Everyone at the college is invited to be involved 



by creating a "doodle-line" self portrait in a 6" x 6" surface. 
It is up to you if you want to sign it or not. They are to be 
dropped off in Rm. 213 in the Tilden Arts Center as soon as 
possible. They will then be formatted and exhibited through- 
out the college. Have fun! 

The Arts Festival is a 3 day event starting May 5th and 
rurming through May 7th. The purchase of a $5.00 button 
will allow you to get into all the events for the entire Festi- 
val. Buttons are available at the college box office on Mon- 
day, Wednesday and Friday from 11:00 - 5:00. They are 
also available at C3TV in S. 'Varmouth 
and Hyannis Art Supply. 

Listed below is a schedule of the upcoming activities: 




•^ 



THE ARTIST WITHIN YOU 



94 

MAY5r/r, 6th, & 1th 

PERFORMANCES •EXHIBITS • HANDSON WORKSHOPS 




Friday 
Noon 



1:00 
1:00 
2:00 



2:00 
2:00 

4:00 



4:00 
4:00 
8:00 

9:00 



Barry McPhee - Open Mike Poetry (Arts Lobby) 

Experimentaf Short Video and Film Extravaganza 

Origami Paper Folding Worlcshop 

Computer Graphics Demonstration by Bill Young (Arts Center) 

Large Format Monotype Worl<shop by Sara Ringler 

"Improv Anonymous" - various improvisational skits performed by 

members of the Rehearsal and Performance Class. Some optional 

audience participation is involved. (Outside commons building) 

Welded Steel Sculpture Demonstration by James Hennessey 

Thom Dutton - The Troubadour Harper will perform selections for 

the harp. (Arts Lobby) 

"Connections: Portraying Relationships"— An open classroom 

reading program of prose, poetry, and dramatic selections by Oral 

Interpretation of Literature Class students and Speech Arts Club 

Members. (Studio Theatre) 

Opening Reception for Art Students works. (Higgins Gallery) 

Open Mike Acoustic Music - Lobby Arts Center 

Cape Dance Theatre Performance (Gym) Premieres New Dances 

with special guest choreographer Brian Feigenbaum. 

Contra Dance (Arts Center) 




Saturday 



9- 1 



10-4 



Advanced Student Art Exhibition - Library - Selected Art Works 
Created by seven art students while at CCCC. 






Craft Show/Sale - Student/faculty craft show and sale. (Lobby) 

Face Painting, Balloon Sculptures, Clowns, Jugglers, Wandering 

Minstrels and much more. 
10-4 Student Art Exhibition - Higgins Gallery 
10-12 Papier Mache Demonstration - Studio A Naomi Congalton will 

conduct a demonstration of papier mache sculpture. 
10 - 12 The "Collegium Musicum" - Renaissance Music 
10-3 Origami Paper Folding Demonstrations - Lobby - Stuart Smith will 

demonstrate paper and currency folding techniques throughout the 

day while also making balloon sculptures. 
1 1 :00 "Improv Anonymous" - various improvisational skits performed by 

members of the.Rehearsal and Performance Class. Some optional 

audience participation is involved. (Outside commons building) 
11-3 Clayworks Demonstration - Carol Horton will demonstrate both 

wheel thrown and hand built clay techniques. 
12-2 David Leclerc will give a hands-on demonstration and workshop 

in the art of papermaking. 
Noon Creative Dramatics for Children and Adults - Behind the Gym 

Using movement, drama, sound and story in a series of short 

skits for children including the story of "Hegedy Peg". 
1 :00 Circus Minimus - A combination of circus traditions and beauty to 

form a spectacle like no other performing show in the country. 

Matthew Goes, the sole performer is a graduate of Ringling Bros. 

Clown College. 
2:00 "Improv Anonymous" - various improvisational skits performed by 

members of the Rehearsal and Performance Class. Some optional 

audience participation is involved. (Outside commons building) 

Freeze - Improv Movement Workshop (Studio Theatre) 

Cape Dance Theatre Performance (Gym) Premieres New Dance 

Cape Cod Community College Chorus 



3:00 
7:00 
8:00 

Ings, more 
events. 



Clowns, balloons, music, Paper Making, Papier Mache, Dramatic Read 
added each day. ...One button gains admission to one or all of the above 

ESL students create quilt for Hyannis campus 



by CAROLE DONAHUE 

Staff Writer 

Twelve students of the center have designed, planned, and 
:reated a wall baimer, which hangs on a wall at the 
Hyannis Campus. These students are a group of En- 
glish as a Second Language students, which is also 
involved with health care awamess. 

Each individual square depicts the student's idea 
[)f what it means to enjoy good health. The students 
sll worked on the creation of the quilt, but the stiching 
was done by Judith Martinez and Josabette Glover. 

The quilt has a tiny floral print backing which is 
the background for the colorful felt squares. One 
square has fruit as a symbol of good health, another 
has a jogger, others depict a sleeping child who repre- 
sents rest, a church and people portray family and 
religion, rings of gold which signify marriage and X 
for "no" to drugs and alcohol are visual statements 
ntade in this quilt which must be seen to be appreci- 
ated. 

The words "Good Health" were reproduced in five 
of the native languages spoken by the students in the 
class and reflect thier countries of origin: Honduras, 
Brazil, Iceland, Iran, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, 
and Kuwait. Arabic, the language of a class late- 
comer, was not represented. 

Dona Seacat, the coordinator of this project 



works in collaboration with Cape Cod Hospital. 

Health topics discussed in the class, are Tobacco educa- 
tion. Stress Management, Mind/Body Connection, and 
Healthy Lifestyles. Group activities and workshops will en- 




able participants to explore their personal health concerns. 
Computer Assisted ELS/ABE Health Project is the sec- 
ond half of this project. Its goal is to build English and 
Computer skiUs through expression of personal health is- 
sues and experiences, by collecting knowledge from 
the variety of culture and perspectives among the stu- 
dents. 

One goal of the program is the creation of NovaNet, 
an on-line Student-Generated distance learning sys- 
tem. The System will allow inftomation created by the 
students to go into a computer on-line "Tutor" pro- 
gram. Students will author their own lessons and con- 
tribute them to an existing bank of 6000 lessons based 
at the University of Ilinois. Students compositions 
will then be changed into NovaNet lessons by pro- 
gram staff 

Information from three major writing themes: health 
stories and experiences; healing knowledge from 
student's cultures; and health, mind, and body 
awamess; the latter will include opinions and reflec- 
tions on the bi-weekly workshops, and will be part of 
a telecommimication lesson. 

Not only will these students writings be completely 
relevent to their own lives,but the experience will be 
extremely empowering and inspirin. This peer teach- 
ing will top the strengths of a multi-level 
envirormient.C 



photo by Ten! Lmdd 



Page 6 MainSheet April 28, 1994 



Entertainment 



Kurt Cobain remembered: ^"'^''"°*''"''"° *'""*""" 



raises many questions 



by SUE CELLI 
Staff Writer 

It can really be hard to try and make 
sense of things that we can't under 
stand hke, why someone would com 
mit the uhimate act of self hatred. 
Especially when it seems like they 
have it all, a great career, millions of adoring 
fans, a family, and lots (and lots) of money. 
Well as most everyone knows, the lead singer 
of Nirvana, Kurt Cobain, took his life a few 
weeks ago. This left many fans upset and 
puzzled, and we would just like to say 
goodbye. 

Kurt Cobain was, and still is, a first rate 
singer, song writer, and guitarist. The news 
of his suicide has been plastered all over the 
news, and most people already know what 
happened, so we don't want to rehash the 
heart breaking details. His fans woiJd like to 



celebrate his life and 
accomplishments, and 
bid him farewell. 

Cobain, together with 
bassist Krist Novoselic 
and drummer David 
Grohl made up the band 
Nirvana, who graced us 
with such songs as 
"Smells Like Teen 
Spirit,^"'hi Bloom," "All 
Apologies," and many, 
many more. Success was 
in their comer, and it 
seemed like they were 
well on their way to 
making more beautiful 
music. 

Cobain certainly had 
his share of problems 
which included a lousy 




Kurt Cobain 



childhood and a severe 
stomach problem. This 
causedhim excruciating 
pain, whichhe remedied 
vifith heroin. In a recent 
Rolling Stone interview, 
Cobain said that he was 
finally really happy, that 
he kicked his heroin 
habit, and that his stom- 
ach was feeling better. 
He was loved and was 
spoken highly of by ev- 
eryone that knew him. 
His fans, family, and 
friends are all confiised 
and devastated, and are 
left wondering why. This 
was interestingly illus- 
trated by Shannon Hoon, 
the lead singer of the 



band "Blind Melon." When he appeared oui 
"The Late Show with David Letterman," 
Shannon had a question mark painted on his 
forehead in observance of Cobain's suicide. 

Is there anything that anyone could have 
done? For now we have no real answers,, 
we're only left to speculate and form our owim 
opinions. 

He was loved by many and will be greatly, 
missed. I'll leave you to ponder his very lasti 
words. Goodbye, and long live the memory, 
of Kurt Cobain. 

" I thank all of you fi-om the pit of my\ 

burning, nauseous stomach for your letters- 
and concern during the last years. I'm too 
much of an erratic, moody person that I don't 
have the passion anymore. So, remember, 
it's better to bum out than to fade away. 
Peace, love, and empathy, 
Kurt Cobain " 



Peter Wolf and the Houseparty 5 rock ttie hiouse 



by JACK HIGGINS 
Entertainment Editor 

CCCC's first major Spring Concert was a complete mu- 
sical success. From the opening beat of "99 Reasons," to 
the 4 song set for the encore. Wolf and his crack shot band 
had the audience "rockin'androUin'." 

The CCCC show was the last "live" tune-up before a ma- 
jor West Coast swdng that vnll include the openiiig of a new 
House of Blues. The House of Blues opening will pit Wolf 's 
band with Aerosmith, and Jinuny Page on 3 separate nights. 

Also appearing at the Spring Concert was local act Planet 
Blues. They played a fine opening set, drenched with- the 
howl of Texas-Louisiana style blues and topped off' with the 
guitar work of "Brother" Phil Paulin. Expect to hear more 
from Planet Blues in the future. 

Special thanks goes out to the Student Activities office 
and the Student Senate for helping put this activity together. 
Left: Drummer David Stefinelli of The Houseparty 5 




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For More Information: 



Concert Review: WSi 



rera 



The cowboys from he 
come to Providence 



by SUE CELLI 
Staff Writer 

Sweaty, screaming, airlwme bodies filled 
the StrandTheater in Providence, on Satur- 
day, April 9th, who were all gathered to see 
Pantera. 

The show was sold out and left many fans 
outside trying to scrounge aroimd for tick- 
ets. This concert had only limited tickets 
available, and the crowd had to he cleared 
out before ten o'clock in order for the the- 
ater to host a "dance party." 

The performance started at around 6:30, 
with opening band Crowbar. Then the mo- 
ment everyone was waiting for, Pantera hit 
the stage at approximately 8:00. The crowd 
went wild, as crowds usually do at concerts. 

Pantera opened with "Strength Beyond 
Strength," a "strong" song to get the crowd 
going. "My Third Arm," "Becoming," "Five 
Minutes alone", and "Hollow," were among 
some of the songs that Phil roared out. They 
played almost an equal amount of songs off 
of each of their three albums. Darrell gave 



us quite a display of his guitar talents, Ywuie 
and Rex were wonderfiil too. 

Pantera members are: Phil Ansehno, lead 
singer, or lead screamer, "Dimebag" Darrell, 
lead and rhythm guitar, bassist Rex, and 
drummer Vmnie Paul. 

Phil didn't hesitate to mention that their 
new release "Far Beyond Driven" was in the 
number one spot on Billboard charts at the 
time. The crowd was whipped into the big- 
gest frenzy when it heard the first few riflfe 
of "This Love." Phil commended Saturday 
nights crowd for it's attitude, stating that the 
last few nights crowds were "lacking enthu- 
siasm." Pan^hrasing is used here l)ecause 
his actual words were unfit to print in the 
paper. Though the crowd was pretty violent, 
Phil did request the audience get even row- 
dier, which was a fim task to carry out. 

Pantera closed the show with an encore 
performance of "Cowboys From Hell," the 
crowd loved it. Pantera plan on returning to 
the area this summer, so be sure to check out 
their show. After fliey left the stage, the lights 
went on, and we were herded out like cattle. 



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Page 7 MainSheet April 28, 1994 



Breaking the Boundaries 



Student Commentary: Ten simple things you can do for animal rights 



, by Sheila Johnson 

'. Special Writer 




I have always been for animal rights ... or so I thought, 
but little did I know that my whole life (up to a year ago) has 
been spent contributing to the mistreatment of animals. 

No, 1 don't beat my dog, or bum ants with a magnify- 
ing glass on sunny days. And 1 even refused to dissect the 
cat in Anatomy during my senior year of high school. But I 
have gone to zoos, circuses, and supported animal test- 
ing by purchasing the products they are tested 
on. I stopped going to the zoos and circuses, 
refiising to watch an elephant adorned in 
feathers and sequins paraded around. I 
also changed my shampoo, moisturizer, 
^"jand soap. This was a good effort but I- 

decided I needed to do more. 
'ay 
1 I requested an information packet 

ftom In Defense of Animals (IDA). With 

this packet I received a list of companies 

■ ;wfao test and do not test on animals. The list 
: jof animal harm companies contained over 100 

tcompanies whose products are used daily by mil- 

[lions of people. Companies such as Johnson & Johnson, 

: (Proctor and Gamble, Arm & Hammer, and Maybelline. 

■ I Could this be true? Not Johnson & Johnson; what about my 
band aids and baby powder? I realized I was a fake, an 
animal rights hypocrite. So I made the decision to switch 
every single product I use. Since I am by no means rich, I 
let things run out and then bought the safer version. I re- 

iplaced shampoos, soap, dish and laundry detergent, shaving 
cream, toilet paper, toothpaste and mouthwash, and the list 
jgoes on. 

If you're an unknowing hypocrite like I was, and want 
:o change, it's simple. Here are ten easy things we all can 
lo to help reduce the suffering of animals. 

1) Buy cruelty free products. According to IDA, 
'Toxic chemicals are force fed to fully conscious dogs. 
Burning chemicals are forced into the eyes of rabbits and 
toxic chemicals are placed on the shaved and raw skin of 
rabbits and guinea pigs." To avoid these products either 
write IDA for a list or start your own. 

Know that almost all cruelty-firee products say it right 
on the package. If not, take advantage of the 800 numbers 
on the back of most products for comments and questions. 
In my experience, I foimd most companies will teU you they 
are using animal testing, although some say "just a little 
bit." If they don't offer to send you information on their 
testing, request it. 

2) Avoid animal products.' Fur, ivory, leather, 
goosedown and musk scents are all products available only 
dirough animal cruelty. At first don't be concerned with 



throwing out your favorite leather coat or snake skin boots, 
there is time for that later. But do change from this day 
forward. Decide to wear the fake leather shoes over the 
real. 

3) Spay and neuter your pets. Every year millions of 
dogs and cats are put to death because there aren't enough 
homes for them. Spay or neuter your own pet to make sure 
that you and your dog don't contribute to the suffering. Call 
the local humane society for details and references for low 
cost services. Also, wien looking for a dog, find it in 
an animal shelter. Pet shops buy from puppy mills 
and large scale breeders. 

4) Become a vegetarian. This may be the 
hardest part. You may think giving up 
cheeseburgers and barbecue chicken for a 
three bean salad has its drawbacks, but it 
will prove to be helpful, not only to animal 
suflferine, but also to vour own health. Ac- 
cording to some recent reports on the sub- 
ject, it seems that 2.1 million people who 
die in the U.S., 68 percent of those deaths are 
caused by the victims diet. According to IDA, 
'An American male eater has a 50 percent chance of 
dying fiom a heart attack, compared to a four percent chance 
of a pure vegetarian suffering the same fate." 

And if your health and animals healths aren't enough 
reason, feeding animals destined for food consumption is a 
major hazard to the enviroimient. According to Jeremy 
Rifkin, author of Beyond Beef, "Burning down and clear- 
cutting forest, largely for grazing lands, has resulted in the 
loss of over 50,000 square miles of Central American rain 
forest since 1960 and the extinction of 17,500 animal and 

plant species a year." ' 

5) Read! Before you make a decision about boycott- 
ing a product or becoming a vegetarian, read about it. Learn 
for yourself what exactly is going on. There are plenty of 
magazines for animal rights such as The Landmark Voice 
213-204-2323 and The Animals Agenda 203-452-0446. 
Educate yourself with books such as Diet For A New America 
by John Robbins, Beyond Beef by Jeremy Rifkin,or In De- 
fense of Animals by Peter Singer. The list goes on. Contact 
your local libraries for more information on magazines and 
books. IDA also has their own magazine which is sent to 
their supporters. 

6) Write letters. Let your voice be heard. Write to 
companies stating your opposition to animal cruelty. Also 
write support letters to companies thafhave made a com- 
mitment to be animal harm free, especially those that are on 
temporary moratorium on testing, such as Consumer Value 
Stores(l CVS Drive, Woonsocket, RI 02895), or Dial Cor- 
poration (111 W.Clarenton, Phoenix, Az 85077). 

7) Volunteer your time. Many animal rights organi- 



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zations are dependent on volunteers to raise consciousness 
and fight cruelty. Consider volunteering for local rights or 
become a local contact for IDA. If there are no animal rights 
groups in your area, consider starting your own. 

8) Spread the word. Most people have no idea what is 
being done to animals in testing. Many think rats and ger- 
bils are the key "guinea pigs," but testing is done on rabbits 
and at times even dogs. Let people know why and what you 
are doing. 

9) Avoid animal "entertainment." Circus and rodeo . 
animals spend most of their lives cramped up in cages and 
traveling in inhumane conditions. According to IDA, "Cir- 
cus animals are trained by starvation and beatings and ro- 
deo animals are cruelly abused during every 'show'." Boy- 
cott animal "entertainment" by not attending these events 
and write to sponsors and facilities to express your concerns 
and disapproval. 

10) Support animal rights. In order to be successful, 
the animal rights movement must stay in the public eye. 
Contribute as much as you can to local organizations. At- 
tend demonstrations against animal abuse in your commu- 
nity. Information on local activities can be obtained by call- 




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Page 8 MainSheet April 28, 1994 



Features 



Children bloom at 7 Seas daycare center 





Favorite acfiv'rties at 7 Seas include " tlie climber," 
bloclcs, and fingerpainting. 



by MEA COSTA 

Staff Writer 

A giant, multi-colored house made of blocks, labeled 
by the children "The Climber," is one of the first things that 
catches your eye as you enter 7 Seas, the college's child day 
care center. 

The center is located on the bottom floor of the Physi- 
cal Education Building. Although the classroom does not 
have any windows, the drawings and projects that hang on 
the walls, make up for any lost scenery. 

Founded in 1987, 7 Seas originated from a collabora- 
tion between CCCC and Happy Daze, hic. Happy Daze has 
operated and owned the "Happy Days! " child care program, 
since 1954. Helen Thauer, recent owner and president of 
Happy Daze, Inc., wants 7 Seas to fill the growing need for 
child day care at reasonable rates. 

The day care center is designated mainly for children 
of students at the college. Students must carry a minimum 
of6 credits to enroll their child. The child must be between 
the ages of two years, nine months and five years of age. 
Faculty and administrative personnel may enroll their chil- 
dren at 7 Seas, but only on a space-available basis. 

The current director of 7 Seas is Candy Schulenburg, 
who also teaches Psychology and Child Psychology here at 
the college. Candy's office is crammed with children's books, 
games, photos and crafts. Even her desk is covered with 
items the children have made for her. 

Regarding 7 Seas philosophy, Candy stated, "We look 
at the whole child, not just their minds?" The philosophy of 
7 Seas rotates around four learning objectives that help a 




(R) Kids at 7 Seas play witti overhead projector. 



A iiappy 7 Seas student. 

child to grow: 

1 . Emotional Growth 

2. Intellectual Development ■ 

3. Social Interactions 

4. Physical Development (e.g. language, speech, hand- 
eye coordination) 

These elements are all explored in a long range Curriculum' 



so that children can experience learning in a variety of meth- 
ods. 

The staff of 7 Seas includes a director, a head teacher, 
and teacher's aides. The ratio of students- to teachers is 7 to 
1 , even though the state requires only 1 to 1 . In addition to 
the indoor facility, there is also a large, grassy, space out- 
doors surrounded by fencing. The children are able to build 
sand-castles, to play safely on the jimgle-gym, and swing. 

The day care center is licensed by the Conunonwealth 
of Massachusetts and meets all accreditation requirements 
for teachers. The facility of 7 Seas is inspected on a regular 
basis by the Town Building Inspector, Fire Department and 
the Office for Children. All children are covered under a 
student accident policy while attending the school. 

Tuition for 7 Seas varies on time spent. For example, a ; 
Ml day, from 7:30a.m. to4:30p.m.,costs $21 adayorSlOl 
for a five day week. 

A morning session, from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., costs . 
$16 a day or $74 for a five day week. 

An afternoon session, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., costs > 
$12 a day or $55 for a five day .week. 

These prices may seem high to many students, but 7 ' 
Seas runs completely on tuition frmds. For those who are : 
eligible, the state provides subsidized day care. In order to i 
be eligible, a family must be receiving AFDC grants or havef'; 
gone off it vidthin the past 90 days. For more information, , 
contact the local Department of Public Welfare. 

Because of 7 seas, students have the opportimity toi 
concentrate on studies while their children have fun and leam i 
at the same time right on campus. 



Photos by Mike Tocre 



The Write Stuff 

The language and literature 
department's showcase for student 
essays is seeldng manuscripts for it's 
fall publication. If you 
would like to see your work 
published contact Bill 
Babner Writing Coordina- 
tor at ext. 408. 





Page 9 MainSheet April 28, 1994 



Features 



Karate schools teach self defense in a violent world 



By Sybil Owens 

Staff Writer 

What would you do if you were attacked suddenly in a 

I parking lot or on the street, or your house? Would you know 
how to respond or would you just freeze? Could taking self 
defense classes help protect you? In a increasingly violent 
I world more and more bulletin boards are displaying self de- 
i fense and martial arts flyers. They look good but do they 
really work and could taking these classes save you? 

If it s taught properly and if the person learns properly 
it could be the difference between life and death, according 
to Jim Brassard, a martial arts instructor at Self Defense Cen- 
ter 2000, located at the Bell Tower Mall in Centerville. 

Mr. Brassard teaches a "complete martial arts system." 
The basic curriculum is Kempo Karate which incorporates 
Kung Fu and Ju Jitsu. Mr. Brassard says that when you learn 
self defense your senses become more aware, you walk and 
feel more self confident which would turn off a potential 
rape or attack. Just a little bit of knowledge could make a 
big difference. 

"In fact," Brassard said, "there are many other major 
benefits. Not only do you learn how to defend yourself, but 
self esteem, confidence, and attitude improve. You learn 
greater self discipline, improved concentration, increased 
levels of relaxation and stress reduction. Plus at least a 

t dozen more physical and health benefits are gained as we.ll." 
[ People have different goals when they join this pro- 
I gram, according to Mr. Brassard, We help people achieve 
what they are looking for. For example, if a person wants to 
lose weight then that individual s program would be tailored 
toward that particular goal. If a person wants to become a 
black belt in Karate then they work on that. 

What if a 250 poimd man attacks a 100 pound woman? 
How does she protect herself?, Should women carry a weapon 
and if so which one? According to Mr. Brassard, your best 
weapon is what you have with you at all times in any situa- 
tion: your body. 

Develop it into a weapon, he says. The mugger will 
choose the time and place of the attack. An external weapon 
can be useless... because you don t have enough time." 

If you were to choose an external weapon, what should 
it be? A knife, says Brassard. 

According to Bruce Bower and Bonnie Peirce, two stu- 



rily on the west coast with a home base in Florida, a knife is 
the most effective weapon for a woman because it can deter 
an attack. According to Bower, a knife is an excellent weapon 
because it s really hard to hurt someone who has a knife 
without getting hurt yourself An attacker, no matter how 
big he is, might think twice before attacking someone who is 
holding a knife because he doesn t want to get hurt, says 
Bower. 

Bower and Peirce, interviewed in Sandwich recently, 
are students of Progressive Fightmg Systems which involves 
Jeet Kune Do concepts and the Filipino martial arts, basi- 



'Bower and Peirce literally 
train in a parking lot at nigtit. 
This way they are able to 
adapt to the setting, realize 
the best fighting options, and 
practice them with the actual 
advantages and disadvan- 
tages that would truly occur 
if an attack happened there.' 



cally street fighting skills, said Bower. We train how to 
respond to the worse possible scenario. The main objective 
of PFS is to increase the odds of surviving a violent encoun- 
ter by using realistic effective self defense and to concen- 
trate on self-preservation. 

According to Bower a person needs to practice defense 
actions hundreds of times in a actual realistic setting. For 
example. Bower and Peirce literally train in a parking lot at 
night. This way they are able to adapt to the setting, realize 
the best fighting options, and practice them with the actual 
advantages and disadvantages that would truly occur if an 
attack happened there. Tliey also practice many types of 
styles of fighting with different opponents so they re pre- 
pared for any type of attack. 

Bower and Peirce say that they learn how to use their 
attributes to their advantage. Mental awareness is one of the 



How you want to handle a bad situation is up to you, 
says Bower, but you need to make that decision beforehand 
and know how you re going to react. 

Also, Peirce said that men and women need to be ^ 
proached differently when teaching self defense and fight- 
ing skills, because reactions, confidence levels, strength, and 
attitude are different among men and women. Some people 
have more attributes then others. Bower added that it also 
depends on what people are willing to do to protect them- 
selves. PFS instructors train weaker and more disadvantaged 
people differently. For instance, instructors may try to teach 
them good knife skills because this can be used to their 
particular advantage. 

Women are encouraged to bite, pinch, and groundf ight 
(fighting the opponent on the ground). When a person at- 
tacks you they may be holding you too close to them, and 
this makes them out of kicking or punching range, says 
Bower, but you can bite and pinch them and do painful 
damage. 

What about people who choose not to defend them- 
se' ves because they think the attacker vidll just become en- 
raged and could kill them? Brassard, Bower, and Peirce all 
say that the bottom line is no one has the right to put their 
hands on you, and that once a person crosses that line then 
you have the right to, and should, defend yourself the best 
way you can. 

Bower says that you don t know what the attacker wants 
to do with you, but once you defend yourself, you ve changed 
that person s psychology and you re in a whole different 
category of victim.... PFS teaches people to be devastating 
- to break a attacker s arm and run away. If you can hurt 
someone that is attacking you, chances are they 11 have a 
harder time convincing themselves that you re an easy vrorth- 
while target. 

Bower and Peirce say that they work on controlling the 
opponent s body They study how to trigger the opponent s 
unconditioned responses or reflexes and put it to their ad- 
vantage. But "self-preservation is very important," says 
Bower. "You want to get yourself out of a potentially danger- 
ous situation quickly and if you can, avoid any physical or 
verbal confrontation. A true master of the art, in most cases 
should be able to coufrol the situation before the physical 
situation arises, says Brassard. 



A MainSheet reporter gives the martial arts a tty 

A night in karate school 

commentary 

By Sybil Owens 

Positioned in rows in a small, white room, a dozen karate 
students bow to their instructor in a gesture of honor and 
respect. These men, women, and teenagers, dressed in the 
loose-fitting uniforms of martial combat, are learning about 
how their bodies are weapons. Kee-iii, yells Jim Brassard, 
their instructor, punch to the ribs, and suddenly their arms 
thrust forward in unison in a shadow punch. 

In today s violent world, most of us wish we had a way to 
protect ourselves. One option is Karate, and recently I took 
some lessons at Self Defense Centers 2000 m Centerville to 
see what was involved. 

The first night I was a little nervous. I had watched some of 
a class the night before and the people were doing sfrange 
moves that were foreign to me. "How are those moves sup- 
posed to protect you," I thought to myself 

In the beginning of class. Instructor Brassard, dressed in a 
red Ghi top and black pants, told us to kneel, close our eyes 
and open our minds to learn. 

We warmed up by stretching, joggmg, and doing sets often 
sit-ups and push ups. I knew that I was definitely getting 
some good exercise out of this class. 

Next, six of the twelve of us lined up to begin a kicking 
drill. Tlie other six students held the pads we were to kick. I 
know it sounds simple, but I was a bit intunated. These people 
weren t just doing any kick. They had a gracefiil, yet power- 
ful, style. I tried to recall the 60-mmute video tape Brassard 
had given me to look at the previous night. "Learn this and 
you 11 be all set," he had said. 

I dumbly looked to the instructor and aske4 Just kick it? 
Then it began. What had seemed so foreign and difficult 
began to develop a little more easily. .just a little. 

To learn a kick movement, I practiced m sets of six a half 



dozen times moving from each person holding a pad to the 
next. The movements need to be quick, sharp, and precise. 
Style and efficiency are important. Each movement requires 
hundreds and even thousands